Jump to content
CaddyInfo Cadillac Forum

Lucas fuel treatment..


acklac7

Recommended Posts

For a while now I have had problems with the engine hesitating/stumbling upon heavy acceleration...Say Im on the highway..and I floor it..Well the engine would hesitate,shake (just for a split second) and then I would get power. WOT's seem to help but I could never completely eliminate the problem..About a three weeks ago I put a small bottle of lucas fuel treatment in the tank when I filled up...I've filled up twice since then and have noticed a MAJOR improvement in performance. I would say I've gained maybe 10-15% more power, and have zero problems with hesitation or stumbling...The engine just purrrss...Even under full throttle up shifts. Now, when I punch it on the highway, I FLY!!! I mean it is truly remarkable...The power is there the second I hit the gas..Almost like I added a small supercharger!

The improvement in performance is great...However I have noticed a decline in MPG...Im at 14.5...usually I am in the high 15-16's (I got a heavy foot..lol). The low MPG may be the result of my newly-formed driving habits...I.E. now that I have more power, I use it!...However maybe the low MPG can be attributed to something else?

Also the side of the bottle says "burns HOT HOT HOT!"...I was wondering what this means? (assuming it means that the fuel treatment burns hotter than plain gas) and how does "burning hot hot hot" improve engine performance?..Also the bottle said something about eliminating carbon build up in the combusiton chamber...Funny the excerpt from the site doesn't mention that.

Any way just wanted to see what you all had to say...I know there is alot of info on here pertaining to additives...And most of the info says "don't use them"....However this stuff seems to be solvent free...What do you think safe to use?....here is a excerpt from the lucas site:

Lucas Fuel Treatment

A powerful blend of oils and additives that contain no SOLVENTS. Designed to increase power and fuel mileage and also lower exhaust emissions through a more complete combustion.

Lucas Fuel Treatment is formulated for both gasoline and diesel engines, carbureted or fuel injected. It gives your fuel system what it really needs - a blend of super slick oils and additives with a high detergent action that allows the engine to operate at maximum efficiency. Also, it cleans and lubricates the carburetor and injectors and causes the fuel to burn more thoroughly for increased power and less fuel consumption. Lucas Fuel Treatment should definitely be used in vehicles that require leaded fuel because it actually replaces the benefits of lead in gasoline without causing harmful emissions. Use it to pass smog tests. Finally, it totally neutralizes the harmful effects of low sulfur diesel fuel.

Directions

Pour Lucas Fuel Treatment directly into fuel tank.

Recommended dosage is 2-3 ounces of Fuel Treatment per 10 gallons of fuel.

Exceeding the recommended dosage is not harmful to your vehicle.

Key Benefits

A great tune-up in a bottle

Cleans and lubricates the fuel system

Neutralizes low sulfur fuel problems

Increases power and miles per gallon by burning excess exhaust emissions

Increases the life of pumps and injectors

A.J.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


The results you have experienced sound impressive.

One potential (possible) harmful side affect keeps me, and others, from adding anything except gasoline to the fuel tank. If there is even a trace of some solvent that will soften varnish, there could be long term damage to the fuel pump.

Varnish is the insulator between the individual layers of otherwise bare copper wire in the fuel pump motor.

Jim

Drive your car.

Use your cell phone.

CHOOSE ONE !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The factory suggests you not use this type of additive in the vehicle. Additives in general can be detrimental to fuel injectors.

When I replaced my 120K mile fuel injectors on my 92 Seville with brand new fuel injectors, it made NO difference in performance. You can't get cleaner than that, so why did it not help? I feel because despite the misleading photos on the cleaner sites, fuel injectors are fairly digital -- they are either working or they are not working. IF they are not working, they should be replaced.

In general, if a product says it has no solvents, but it claims to clean, that seems suspect to me. But maybe they mean it cleans your wallet? (just kidding!)

Bruce

2016 Cadillac ATS-V gray/black

Follow me on: Twitter Instagram Youtube

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have used a Lucas product called Lucas Fuel Treatment, in the photo below its the third bottle with the green cap. I provided a link. I used it in my 91 and I will say this, after using it I pulled my throttle body, and the plate had a nice coating of light oil on it and it was clean as a whistle. I had this discussion with the guru and my contention was that is was NOT a solvent but an oil based product (smell and feel it) and I felt I got good results with it. Low and behold I just went to their web site and what do I see:

Lucas Fuel Treatment

A powerful blend of oils and additives that contain no SOLVENTS. Designed to increase power and fuel mileage and also lower exhaust emissions through a more complete combustion.

Lucas Fuel Treatment is formulated for both gasoline and diesel engines, carbureted or fuel injected. It gives your fuel system what it really needs - a blend of super slick oils and additives with a high detergent action that allows the engine to operate at maximum efficiency. Also, it cleans and lubricates the carburetor and injectors and causes the fuel to burn more thoroughly for increased power and less fuel consumption. Lucas Fuel Treatment should definitely be used in vehicles that require leaded fuel because it actually replaces the benefits of lead in gasoline without causing harmful emissions. Use it to pass smog tests. Finally, it totally neutralizes the harmful effects of low sulfur diesel fuel.

Honestly I don't know if a believe or even care about most of the above, that its NOT a solvent is what I like, and that I think passing a petroleum like substance through my fuel system would be an effective cleaner

http://www.lucasoil.com/products/display_p...atid=2&loc=show

Everything in moderation, and use stuff like this as per the directions and use as little as possible. Pull your throttle body after using it and look at it. I may be stuck by lightening by the purists, but I like it.... and had good results from it. I would want us all to try it if only just once... call it the placebo effect but I felt a difference.. and no I don't own stock

post-2998-1137003066.gif

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

1996 and newer - DTC codes OBD2 >> https://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/gm/obd_codes.htm

How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

Cadillac History & Specifications Year by Year  http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/index.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

By the way, here is my prior discussion on this subject from 11/04, I called it Lucas injector cleaner, but its the same stuff...

http://caddyinfo.ipbhost.com/index.php?sho...1&st=&p=entry

One more thing, I respect the others here who have stated a different opinion and my opinion is not meant to undermine or refute anyone else. I lead the band when it comes to barring STP solvent based fuel system/injector cleaners which as others have mentioned can clean the shellac off of coil windings..

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

1996 and newer - DTC codes OBD2 >> https://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/gm/obd_codes.htm

How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

Cadillac History & Specifications Year by Year  http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/index.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have used a fuel system cleaner once during my ownership of my Cadillac, and that was about a month ago. I will say that I perceived an improvement in both smoothness and power. Could it have cleaned the fuel injectors? Maybe. Was it a placebo effect? Maybe.

It sounds like you had very objective results though...no more hesitation and bogging at WOT. I'm certainly open to trying something like this if I had such a problem.

Regarding your lower mileage, the WOT treatments are probably to blame there!

Jason(2001 STS, White Diamond)

"When you turn your car on...does it return the favor?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have used a Lucas product called Lucas Fuel Treatment, in the photo below its the third bottle with the green cap. call it the placebo effect but I felt a difference.. and no I don't own stock

:lol: I don't own stock either (I know my post sounded like a sales pitch) but I did really notice a big big difference in performance....Funny thing was I didn't really notice the results until last week (when I started classes and had to commute about an hour on the highway (several 15 min trips everyday)....I kept wondering why in the world my engine was running so well..Then I remembered the fuel treatment I had put in a few weeks earlier.

Regarding fuel injectors, the main reason for using fuel treatment was to cure an apparent intermittent injector problem (which has not gone away)...And the symptoms almost always are the same: Take a short trip over to the Grocery store...like 30 seconds (I hate to do it...most of the time I walk)....Then come back. Sure enough the next morning/day I will notice the idle going ga-ga, bouncing up and down between 700-1000...Pull the codes...Sure enough p119...Open or shorted fuel injector..I can usually restart the car and the code/problem will be gone/history....Im thinking the injector might be sticking open due to deposits?...Here is what the manual says about fuel deposits...and it really fits with my scenario, except the manual doesn't note deposits as a cause for an injector sticking open:

"Fuel system deposits can cause various drivability problems. Deposits usually occur during hot soaks after key "OFF" . Poor fuel quality or driving patterns such as short trips followed by long "cool down" periods can cause injector deposits. This occurs when the fuel remaining in the injector tip evaporates and leaves deposits. Leaking injectors can increased injector deposits. Deposits on fuel injectors affect their spray pattern, which in turn could cause reduced power, unstable idle, hard starts and poor fuel economy."

Like I said it doesn't mention if injector deposits can cause an injector to stick open....anyone know if this is plausible?

Also does anyone know how to run the injector flow override on OBD-I? (PS10) The manual states that you can fire each injector through the PCM to determine injector flow. However I can't figure out if /where the PCM stores the flow-rate, do you need an additional tool to measure the flow?

Marvel Mystery Oil

Jeff

Had a buddy tell me that one of his buddies put some MMO in with his fuel, and next thing you know the Cat was glowing red (like Jbell's)....I put some MMO in with my oil once..but sort of shy'd away from putting it in the gas tank

A.J.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have used a Lucas product called Lucas Fuel Treatment, in the photo below its the third bottle with the green cap. I provided a link. I used it in my 91 and I will say this, after using it I pulled my throttle body, and the plate had a nice coating of light oil on it and it was clean as a whistle.

Ok, I'll play the devils advocate here. What I don't understand is that the injectors are well down stream of the TB, so how can it clean the TB & throttle plate? '91 was a 4.9 no? Or was it TB injected 4.5?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

THAT is a good point Larry, I am not sure how that is.... but I can say that the TB was clean and had a light coating of oil on it... Good Point

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

1996 and newer - DTC codes OBD2 >> https://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/gm/obd_codes.htm

How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

Cadillac History & Specifications Year by Year  http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/index.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a friend at work that had a small fuel injected pick-up. It was running very poor, shaking and hesitating now and then. It was just enough that he thought a bottle of some type of cleaner might help. I know he bought Lucas brand because I drove him to pick up a bottle and I said to him " that bottle on my seat better be caped tight or I would feed what ever was left in the bottle after spilling on my seat to him". So he used it and his truck got worse, I did not follow up with him on why or what happened but he did say at the coffee break table his mechanic said it broke something up and cloged a few injectors even more. I think he had injectors installed after that. There are just so many different things that can happen that results vary greatly according to what the main problem was. I can not say if that stuff is good or bad. I'm just telling something that I know happened so others who know more can better judge what to do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've used it in our Caddy's and in my 92 Chevy truck. It is suppose to have a lubricant for the fuel pump in it too but I used it in my 92 Chevy every once in a while, and this summer my fuel pump went out (with 347,000 kms on it). Never noticed any better or worse driveability but, I thought it was lubricating my pump, guess not.

Spence

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is suppose to have a lubricant for the fuel pump...and this summer my fuel pump went out (with 347,000 kms on it).

I think that may be more coincidence than anything. 350,000 clicks on an electric fuel pump is one LONG lived fuel pump. As one might say, "it doesn't owe you a dime at that point." :)

Jason(2001 STS, White Diamond)

"When you turn your car on...does it return the favor?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's another good discussion on Lucas oil products: To ADDitive or Not

That was a good discussion Kger2, thanks for posting the link

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

1996 and newer - DTC codes OBD2 >> https://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/gm/obd_codes.htm

How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

Cadillac History & Specifications Year by Year  http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/index.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've had good luck with Lucas producs in the past, but that stuff is certainly for those with dire engine trouble. I doubt that you would gain too much response or power from the fuel system cleaners Lucas makes on a N* that a good afternoon of heavy throttle wouldn't. I used a bit on the '95 and it did add a bit of "purr", but anything added to a cars' fuel system can damage the fuel pump, regulator, and injectors if you use it too much so one must be careful.

--Ben

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regarding fuel injectors, the main reason for using fuel treatment was to cure an apparent intermittent injector problem (which has not gone away)...And the symptoms almost always are the same: Take a short trip over to the Grocery store...like 30 seconds (I hate to do it...most of the time I walk)....Then come back. Sure enough the next morning/day I will notice the idle going ga-ga, bouncing up and down between 700-1000...Pull the codes...Sure enough p119...Open or shorted fuel injector..I can usually restart the car and the code/problem will be gone/history....Im thinking the injector might be sticking open due to deposits?...Here is what the manual says about fuel deposits...and it really fits with my scenario, except the manual doesn't note deposits as a cause for an injector sticking open:

No manufacturer recommends Lucas or any other fuel system cleaner...The only ones recommending Lucas, STP, or any other snake-oil "treatments" are the marketing and sales organizations of the additive manufacturer. :lol:

If you have a shorted injector, no amount of Lucas "whatever" is going to fix it....you need to determine what injector is defective and replace it. Spend the money on the GM injector as aftermarket injectors often do not have the same flow rate and will cause driveability issues.

Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Come on Kevin, try it once. You know me long enough to know that I am conservative about this stuff...I konw it won't fix a defective injector, but I can tell you that my engine felt stronger and smoother :lol:

post-2998-1137035195.gif

post-2998-1137035265.gif

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

1996 and newer - DTC codes OBD2 >> https://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/gm/obd_codes.htm

How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

Cadillac History & Specifications Year by Year  http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/index.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:lol: I don't own stock either (I know my post sounded like a sales pitch) but I did really notice a big big difference in performance....Funny thing was I didn't really notice the results until last week (when I started classes and had to commute about an hour on the highway (several 15 min trips everyday)....I kept wondering why in the world my engine was running so well..Then I remembered the fuel treatment I had put in a few weeks earlier.

Aha! It is far more likely that the extended driving schedule was responsible for your observation.

I think much of the subjective reporting in this thread is related to the following quote:

"Experimenter's bias is a phenomenon caused by the inability of human participants in an experiment to remain completely objective, in which the human experimenter directly influences the experiment's outcome based upon his or her personal desires or expectations."

When making a conclusion (from a sample size of one?!?), it is important to list sources of error; this may include variables that were beyond reasonable control. Was the fuel (on a subsequent fill-up) the same quality as a previous fill-up? Was the same filling station used? Same batch? Was the car operated in the same manner (under the same conditions) before and after the study variable was changed?

___________________________________________________

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:lol: I don't own stock either (I know my post sounded like a sales pitch) but I did really notice a big big difference in performance....Funny thing was I didn't really notice the results until last week (when I started classes and had to commute about an hour on the highway (several 15 min trips everyday)....I kept wondering why in the world my engine was running so well..Then I remembered the fuel treatment I had put in a few weeks earlier.

Aha! It is far more likely that the extended driving schedule was responsible for your observation.

I think much of the subjective reporting in this thread is related to the following quote:

"Experimenter's bias is a phenomenon caused by the inability of human participants in an experiment to remain completely objective, in which the human experimenter directly influences the experiment's outcome based upon his or her personal desires or expectations."

When making a conclusion (from a sample size of one?!?), it is important to list sources of error; this may include variables that were beyond reasonable control. Was the fuel (on a subsequent fill-up) the same quality as a previous fill-up? Was the same filling station used? Same batch? Was the car operated in the same manner (under the same conditions) before and after the study variable was changed?

Indeed, it's hard to fight the temptation to "get" the experimental results you are looking for... ;) I have been fighting that temptation for a couple of decades. :lol:

The saddest thing in life is wasted talent

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:lol: I don't own stock either (I know my post sounded like a sales pitch) but I did really notice a big big difference in performance....Funny thing was I didn't really notice the results until last week (when I started classes and had to commute about an hour on the highway (several 15 min trips everyday)....I kept wondering why in the world my engine was running so well..Then I remembered the fuel treatment I had put in a few weeks earlier.

Aha! It is far more likely that the extended driving schedule was responsible for your observation.

I think much of the subjective reporting in this thread is related to the following quote:

"Experimenter's bias is a phenomenon caused by the inability of human participants in an experiment to remain completely objective, in which the human experimenter directly influences the experiment's outcome based upon his or her personal desires or expectations."

When making a conclusion (from a sample size of one?!?), it is important to list sources of error; this may include variables that were beyond reasonable control. Was the fuel (on a subsequent fill-up) the same quality as a previous fill-up? Was the same filling station used? Same batch? Was the car operated in the same manner (under the same conditions) before and after the study variable was changed?

LOL!!! On the way to class I was thinking about my post...And realized that I had left a number of variables out. I figured someone would call me on them...didn't think it would take this long..lol

First off every Tuesday I had been filling up at Exxon on "tiger Tuesday"....When you get premium for the price of mid-grade...Eventually I filled up somewhere else and noticed that my car ran significantly better with another brand of fuel (not sure who it was from)..It was about 3 months ago that I stopped using Exxon gas.

Since then I haven't really been keeping track of what gas I purchase..But one thing is for sure..I never go to Exxon. I would say it's either Super America or BP 95% of the time (judging by which stations are nearest to my house)

"Was the car operated in the same manner (under the same conditions) before and after the study variable was changed?"

This is a definate yes...With the exception of the 10 day period that my driving was limited to side streets during winter break...Prior to that I had it on the highway the same amount of time..if not more often.

Another variable that crossed my mind was temperature...In the three week period before I left for FLA the temps were in the teens-20's....The temps have been in the mid 30's-50's since I've been back.

I reviewed all of the variables before posting...and I kept ending up with the same answer: My car has never run this well, for as long as I can remember...Cold temp's/hot temp's....this gas/that gas...ton's of WOT's....they all had some effect...And I know it sounds subjective, but I know my car..and it's never run this well....

And in regards to the quote....I wasn't searching for any outcomes!! To tell you the truth I completely forgot about adding the FT!....As I said before..All of the sudden I was getting power that previously was not there..At least in recent memory (like 12 months)..So I started to think of all the variables that had changed...And vola! it hit me...The fuel treatment.

I will admit...there are a few other variables in play, however the use of the fuel additive is the one that made the most sense to me.

A.J.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do think it's one thing to say, "wow, this fuel cleaner added 10 horsepower!" But I think it's another to say, "after using this fuel cleaner...and trying to isolate any other variables...my car no longer bogs down and bucks at WOT on the Interstate."

I think the most reasonable thing to do would be for A.J. to continue to monitor how his car runs, and try other fuels over the next few months to try to isolate the performance improvement to the Lucas treatment.

Jason(2001 STS, White Diamond)

"When you turn your car on...does it return the favor?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:lol: I don't own stock either (I know my post sounded like a sales pitch) but I did really notice a big big difference in performance....Funny thing was I didn't really notice the results until last week (when I started classes and had to commute about an hour on the highway (several 15 min trips everyday)....I kept wondering why in the world my engine was running so well..Then I remembered the fuel treatment I had put in a few weeks earlier.

Aha! It is far more likely that the extended driving schedule was responsible for your observation.

I think much of the subjective reporting in this thread is related to the following quote:

"Experimenter's bias is a phenomenon caused by the inability of human participants in an experiment to remain completely objective, in which the human experimenter directly influences the experiment's outcome based upon his or her personal desires or expectations."

When making a conclusion (from a sample size of one?!?), it is important to list sources of error; this may include variables that were beyond reasonable control. Was the fuel (on a subsequent fill-up) the same quality as a previous fill-up? Was the same filling station used? Same batch? Was the car operated in the same manner (under the same conditions) before and after the study variable was changed?

OUCH Kevin! :lol:

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

1996 and newer - DTC codes OBD2 >> https://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/gm/obd_codes.htm

How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

Cadillac History & Specifications Year by Year  http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/index.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have used a Lucas product called Lucas Fuel Treatment, in the photo below its the third bottle with the green cap. I provided a link. I used it in my 91 and I will say this, after using it I pulled my throttle body, and the plate had a nice coating of light oil on it and it was clean as a whistle.

Ok, I'll play the devils advocate here. What I don't understand is that the injectors are well down stream of the TB, so how can it clean the TB & throttle plate? '91 was a 4.9 no? Or was it TB injected 4.5?

the egr tubes are upstream of the injectors, but i don't think they're in anyway connected to the fuel system.

jackg 90seville 99k

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I had access to some wire coil, I'd try this myself. I am curious though.

Get some wire coils from a motor or such, and soak it in a straight solution of Fuel injector cleaner for a few weeks, then wipe the wire down with a white cloth & see if the coating is removed/transferred to the cloth.

It's an unfair test because the tank isn't a straight mixture, then again, it's not like the injector cleaner contains acetone right?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...