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Fuel Tank Capacity


adallak

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....Is it the volume of gasoline one can fill in until the automatic nozzle turns off?

NO.

More like the volume/capacity stated in the Owners Manual.

Jim

Drive your car.

Use your cell phone.

CHOOSE ONE !

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....Is it the volume of gasoline one can fill in until the automatic nozzle turns off?

NO.

More like the volume/capacity stated in the Owners Manual.

Jim, that's what I think too. On the other side, IMHO it makes more sense to indicate in the manual a volume one can actually CONTROL, rather than one you only have in mind.

The saddest thing in life is wasted talent

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I have no clue how much fuel remains in the tank when the fuel level drops below the bottom of the pump inlet. But it ain't much!

Fast forward to a '98 Seville and the stated capacity is 18.5 gallons. My average fill is ~~ 15 gallons because when the guage gets close to E, I feel the need to spend some money.

Jim

Drive your car.

Use your cell phone.

CHOOSE ONE !

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JimD...

I am with you on that one.. :)...but maybe even "MORE" cautious.

When mine drops a little bit below 1/4 I start looking for a station.

One thing I don't want to do, is have to walk to a station.

I would rather ride in my Cadillac than walk. :D

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I fill up once I get to a quarter tank too. I've heard too many stories about vapor lock issues occuring with low gas levels, and I drive with purpose. No time to be stopped on the side of the road ;) At a quarter tank I put in 12-14 gallons, and on the rare occasion I flirt with the Big E I put in 16.5 gallons, give or take a bit. Far cry from the 20 gallons everything online says about my car.

No matter where you go, there you are.

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Last time I had to replace a fuel pump, which went out when the car was almost empty, the mechanic told me to make sure the tank doesn't get below 1/4 because the gas cools the pump, and when it's near empty, the pump heats up and, in my case, burns up.

Don't know if this is a wive's tale, but, I took that as a several-hundred dollar lesson.

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Last time I had to replace a fuel pump, which went out when the car was almost empty, the mechanic told me to make sure the tank doesn't get below 1/4 because the gas cools the pump, and when it's near empty, the pump heats up and, in my case, burns up.

Don't know if this is a wive's tale, but, I took that as a several-hundred dollar lesson.

Very true, happens all the time. My cadillac takes 20 gallons. It usually takes me 60 to fill it and I never let it get lower than 4 gallons

GM FAN FOREVER

Nice, clean, luxury= fine automobile

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Just a related story, if anyone is interested: I once started my '97 DeVille on a chilly day when the tank had about 3 gallons left in it (as measured on flat ground) and I was standing on a hill facing downwards. Since it was chilly and the car was frosty, I left it running while I packed. When I was standing in the slope, the meter showed a flashing E. After about three minutes it stopped, and it started again once I rolled down the hill so that the car was level again. Then it showed 3 gallons on the meter again, too. If I understand it correctly, the dry-sump holds some gas no matter what position the car is in, the gas runs away from it if you face downhill, and it lasts for about 3 minutes worth of cold-start idling.

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Last time I had to replace a fuel pump, which went out when the car was almost empty, the mechanic told me to make sure the tank doesn't get below 1/4 because the gas cools the pump, and when it's near empty, the pump heats up and, in my case, burns up.

Don't know if this is a wive's tale, but, I took that as a several-hundred dollar lesson.

Total BS... It is true - the fuel flows through the pump and the fuel cools the pump windings but as long as fuel is flowing through the pump, no damage to the pump will occur. If the car is run out of gas, that is hard on the fuel pump - especially if the driver attempts to start the engine with it starving for fuel.

Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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Last time I had to replace a fuel pump, which went out when the car was almost empty, the mechanic told me to make sure the tank doesn't get below 1/4 because the gas cools the pump, and when it's near empty, the pump heats up and, in my case, burns up.

Don't know if this is a wive's tale, but, I took that as a several-hundred dollar lesson.

Total BS... It is true - the fuel flows through the pump and the fuel cools the pump windings but as long as fuel is flowing through the pump, no damage to the pump will occur. If the car is run out of gas, that is hard on the fuel pump - especially if the driver attempts to start the engine with it starving for fuel.

LOL I was waiting for your reply.

The saddest thing in life is wasted talent

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My fuel gauge doesnt read the levels at all. So I have to keep a guess of what is pumped/used. Any help you guys? Fuses are all ok.

I do not think you can fix the problem without dropping the tank and removing the sending unit. As a temporary measure I would reset trip meter every time I fill it up. Knowing your average MPG, you can refill the tank before it is too late based on the data from the trip meter.

The saddest thing in life is wasted talent

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My fuel gauge doesnt read the levels at all. So I have to keep a guess of what is pumped/used. Any help you guys? Fuses are all ok.

I do not think you can fix the problem without dropping the tank and removing the sending unit. As a temporary measure I would reset trip meter every time I fill it up. Knowing your average MPG, you can refill the tank before it is too late based on the data from the trip meter.

Does the STS have a fueled used function in the DIC? My '97 DeVille does, and then you can just reset that after filling up. If you know your tank capacity, it is easy to know when to get fuel in case of a tank meter failure.

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It does, but in my experience the accuracy is pretty hit-or-miss, up to +/- a whole gallon or so.

How much you can put in at the pump varies quite a lot, easily as much as you mention. A slight slope at the gas station, for example, can make a difference. Another factor is that when you fill the car, the gas inside the tank gets stirred (so that waves are produced). That affects when the pump shuts off. Filling the car up to exactly the same level each time takes way to long for it to be done at normal gas stations. Some years ago I read a question in a car magazine related to this. They explained that when they tested cars and measured the gas mileage, filling gas took half an hour for each car. The reason for this was to be able to fill it up to the exact same level each time.

I think that what you have interpreted as variations in the [fueled used] meter, is in fact variations in the fill level at which the gas pump shuts off (even if you use the same pump each time).

Either way, no matter what the variation is due to you will have to factor it in. If you have a 20 gallon tank, use the meter and think of it as an 18 gallon tank. It should be the most accurate way of determining how much gas is left without changing the actual fuel gauge.

/Jonas

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Wow. I'd never considered the slope of the ground and its effect on "fuel level." Gas station lots seem more or less level, so I didn't factor that in. I do consider that the pumping of gas creates waves, so I top off my tank (despite the warnings not to ;) ) and sometimes pump up to an extra half gallon. I figure that pumping within +/- 0.5 gallons of the fuel used meter is acceptable error for it. But considering ground slope changes everything.

No matter where you go, there you are.

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It does, but in my experience the accuracy is pretty hit-or-miss, up to +/- a whole gallon or so.

How much you can put in at the pump varies quite a lot, easily as much as you mention. A slight slope at the gas station, for example, can make a difference. Another factor is that when you fill the car, the gas inside the tank gets stirred (so that waves are produced). That affects when the pump shuts off. Filling the car up to exactly the same level each time takes way to long for it to be done at normal gas stations. Some years ago I read a question in a car magazine related to this. They explained that when they tested cars and measured the gas mileage, filling gas took half an hour for each car. The reason for this was to be able to fill it up to the exact same level each time.

I think that what you have interpreted as variations in the [fueled used] meter, is in fact variations in the fill level at which the gas pump shuts off (even if you use the same pump each time).

Either way, no matter what the variation is due to you will have to factor it in.

If you have a 20 gallon tank, use the meter and think of it as an 18 gallon tank.

It should be the most accurate way of determining how much gas is left without changing the actual fuel gauge.

/Jonas

LOL... Just me, but I would think of it as a "15 GALLON" tank.

I don't like to walk... especially because I ran out of gas... :) :)

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