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Problem With Rear Brake Line


Burcham

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The other day, I was leaving a strip mall in my 99 SLS, I pushed the brake pedal slightly to stop at the street. The pedal went all the way to the floor. I managed to "pump" the pedal and stop. Got out and saw the trail of brake fluid on the parking lot. The brake line that runs from the left side to the right rear wheel had rusted into. About six weeks ago while having my tires changed, I walked under the car and inspected what I could. I remember seeing the line and wondering why it was copper and all the rest were steel. If I had felt it, I would have known it wasn't copper and was about rusted out. I thank my lucky stars I wasn't on the interstate or heavy traffic. All the other lines were in good shape, only the one was rusted.

If you haven't done so in a while, Please check ALL your brake lines at your earliest convience.

Sincerely

Dave

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The other day, I was leaving a strip mall in my 99 SLS, I pushed the brake pedal slightly to stop at the street. The pedal went all the way to the floor. I managed to "pump" the pedal and stop. Got out and saw the trail of brake fluid on the parking lot. The brake line that runs from the left side to the right rear wheel had rusted into. About six weeks ago while having my tires changed, I walked under the car and inspected what I could. I remember seeing the line and wondering why it was copper and all the rest were steel. If I had felt it, I would have known it wasn't copper and was about rusted out. I thank my lucky stars I wasn't on the interstate or heavy traffic. All the other lines were in good shape, only the one was rusted.

If you haven't done so in a while, Please check ALL your brake lines at your earliest convience.

Sincerely

Dave

Dave, it is strange that only one line was bad. I would carefully inspect all of them one more time.

The saddest thing in life is wasted talent

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I would just change all the brake lines. The only way to be sure that you don't have rust where you can't see it is to take them out, and if one is rusted through then you can bet that you wouldn't want any of them put back, once you saw them.

CTS-V_LateralGs_6-2018_tiny.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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When I owned a '94 Eldorado, I had to change the entire brake line system under the car going from about the fire wall to back, including the rear cross-over. It was time consuming because I wanted to make sure it was done right and I had not previously done any brake line work. I would inspect all brake lines and replace anything that looks bad. If you can't do it yourself it may cost upwards of $500 to have someone do it. Well worth it!

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everyone once in a while I see people start threads like this. the reality of it is the brake lines are steel and rust, the onus is on the owner to have them checked/inspected as required, this goes for every make and model of car.

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Also have to check the fluid to make sure it is not breaking down and rotting the lines from the inside

GM FAN FOREVER

Nice, clean, luxury= fine automobile

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Thanks all for the advise. I had this line replaced that day by a dealer while I waited. I asked that all lines be inspected and when the tech was through, before he let it down, I asked if I could also look. We took a flashlite and inspection mirror and examined each one all the way. I have known the tech for about 30 years, and he said he had never seen one rust up like that one did and the others be like new, it was rusted pretty badly from fitting to fitting. He said he had seen it some on cars that come from where the roads are salted but that usually affected all lines about the same. He had no answer for it. No salt on the roads in this area, I dunno, wonder if heat from the brake could have caused it. Anyway, I posted this because others may have similar issues with their brake lines and not be aware of them. I've been driving since Sears sold driver's licenses, and never had an issue with a brake line period, master and wheel cylinders but not the lines. But for sure, I will be inspecting them regularly now.

Thanks

Dave

Dave, it is strange that only one line was bad. I would carefully inspect all of them one more time.

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well you can tell you are not from upstate, NY. lol brake lines are commonly rotted, along with the gas lines, and everything else

GM FAN FOREVER

Nice, clean, luxury= fine automobile

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well you can tell you are not from upstate, NY. lol brake lines are commonly rotted, along with the gas lines, and everything else

No Rock, been up there, beautiful country, love it. I'm from "down south", Corinth Mississippi to be exact. We don't usually have many salt or cold releated problems, but on the other hand have you ever seen a car with a window blown out from the heat? Or driven down a road that the pavement was melting and you were leaving tracks on it? Or gotten 1st degree burns on you hands from grabbing the steering wheel before you let it cool down? Anyway it cooled off some today, only 95d with an Index of 104d. I better go look for my fur linned windshield scraper and can of de-icer.

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It sounds like that one brake line may have been plain steel, not the stainless steel allow that is normally used in brake lines on Cadillacs.

CTS-V_LateralGs_6-2018_tiny.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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It sounds like that one brake line may have been plain steel, not the stainless steel allow that is normally used in brake lines on Cadillacs.

Stainless steel isn't used for brake line material on a Cadillac unless aftermarket stainless lines are installed.

Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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I did a quick check online and it does seem that rigid brake lines are still available in steel, as opposed to stainless steel. I find this very surprising, as it guarantees that the brake lines will rust out eventually in just about any climate. Since the average age of a car in the USA is now 9.5 years, that's a public safety issue. We've solved rust problems with the body, exhaust system, the suspension, etc., but apparently not the brake lines. Amazing.

CTS-V_LateralGs_6-2018_tiny.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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