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Tire Inflation Pressure

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As you know, tire pressure affects fuel economy drastically. I usually overinflate the tires by a few psi before a long highway trip to save gas, and bring it back to the recommended value for everyday local driving. Even a couple of extra psi can make the ride too harsh and make the old suspension clunk and squeak.

What is your experience?


The saddest thing in life is wasted talent

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There are several variables:

Fuel mileage

Ride comfort

Tire wear

My choice is tire wear which I monitor regularily with a tread depth gauge.

If a tire measures less tread depth at the center, I drop the tire pressure a pound or two.

If a tire measures less tread depth at the edges, I increase the tire pressure a pound or two.

Your compromise is your compromise.


Jim

Drive your car.

Use your cell phone.

CHOOSE ONE !

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I always run my tires at 36 front and 34 rear and find it handles better and it seems to roll easier than the 32/28 range


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What JimD said.

In my Fleetwood, I keep my tires at 32 psi which results in even tire wear across the tread and good ride quality.


Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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I check once/week and keep them@ 30psi,spot on!


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What JimD said.

In my Fleetwood, I keep my tires at 32 psi which results in even tire wear across the tread and good ride quality.

KHE,

I believe the manual recommends 30 psi for all four Fleetwood's tires. Does it mean GM did not care of even tire wear and was more concerned with soft ride?


The saddest thing in life is wasted talent

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What JimD said.

In my Fleetwood, I keep my tires at 32 psi which results in even tire wear across the tread and good ride quality.

KHE,

I believe the manual recommends 30 psi for all four Fleetwood's tires. Does it mean GM did not care of even tire wear and was more concerned with soft ride?

I doubt 2 psi would make a difference in tire wear. When mine are down to 30 psi, I notice the tires will squeal when turning corners.


Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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I have learned, from the tire pressure monitors on my '08, that on a warm day and driving at highway speeds, I'll gain 3.5 - 4 psi from my cold setting. In order to stay in what I consider to be a "safe" pressure range at speed, I'll keep my tires at 33.5 psi cold. This gives me the best of all worlds, good low speed handling, good ride comfort, and good highway fuel economy. I don't like to exceed 38 psi hot.

BBF, I must advise caution on your 36 psi settings on the fronts, which I feel could exceed 40 psi at highway speeds. This would be particularly important when going from winter into early spring. If you get one hot day of highway driving (or head south) and the tire pressures were set during freezing temps, you could exceed the 44 psi sidewall maximum printed on the tire.

Outside temps do have a direct influence on the highway (hot) pressures, as I found out on my last trip to Pittsburgh. I think it was over

90° F outside and my pressures went to 37 when the tires got hot, but I got another MPG average on the trip! I'm sure other factors were at work, we'll never be able to account for all variables, but tire pressures definitely have a major influence on fuel economy.


Never underestimate the amount of a persons greed.

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I'm sure other factors were at work, we'll never be able to account for all variables, but tire pressures definitely have a major influence on fuel economy.

The next after the pressure if not the most important factor affecting fuel economy is the wear of the tires. Worn ones give you the best fuel economy.

The saddest thing in life is wasted talent

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I can validate JohnnyG's comments on the 3-4 psi increase as the tires heat up. Mine are at 30 psi. Comfort is more important to me than tire wear or mileage. That's why I drive a Cadillac.

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I can validate JohnnyG's comments on the 3-4 psi increase as the tires heat up. Mine are at 30 psi. Comfort is more important to me than tire wear or mileage. That's why I drive a Cadillac.

I keep mine at 34 PSI. [44 PSI max on Michelins I have]

One more comment on loading and heat generation. The Higher the PSI the less heat is generated in the tire due to flexing, so that is why when towing or high speed driving it is recommended you increase tire pressure.

The classic mistake is the Explorer which recommended 26/28 PSI although it is a SUV/Truck. Due to heating of high speed driving/towing in summer, and defective OEM Firestone/ Bridgestone tires caused a significant number of tires to de-laminate internally and self destruct. Hence the Explorer lawsuits and recalls.

Keep in mind when high speed driving or carrying a full load of passengers/towing.

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