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Flat at lunch


Bruce Nunnally

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Tires 1, bruce 0 again lol.

35,600 miles or so.

Had a flat tire at lunch. Glad I noticed it in the parking lot, and certainly a nice day to change the tire. Worn low enough no point in having it repaired. Super glad the tire did not give up the ghost on my recent road trip!

Put the temporary spare on. BTW, the new CTS does not even have a temp spare, or the temp spare is an EXTRA $250 option. The new car comes with a can of inflation goo.

Drove home, and swapped the new Kumbo tires on the original CTS wheels onto the back. So much nicer to work with a floor jack and a +-wrench than the factory stuff. Put the non-flat tire off the car into the trunk as the new full-size spare. Had to pull out a Styrofoam insert to allow it to fit, but np otherwise. Put the temp spare and foam in the garage. Ok, my CTS is 20 lbs heavier than with only the temp spare, but I'll trade that for having a full size spare.

I'll swap on the Kumbo W-rated tires on the front as time allows, hopefully later in the day or Thursday.

Glad I have the 2nd set of wheels/tires; they are working out fine.

Bruce

2016 Cadillac ATS-V gray/black

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Hi Bruce,

Dealing with a flat is always a pain in the posterior end. I have a tip to share, with everyone, that is safer than changing a tire (in high traffic situations), faster, and a few other good reasons. In my trunk I keep a pair of pliers, box cutter, air pump that plugs into the cigarette lighter, and a flat repair kit that includes 3 tacky rope plugs, an awl, and push hook. I've used my repair kit twice and it works like a charm.

Pull the nail, screw, etc out of the tire with the pliers. Then clean the hole out with the awl. Next thread one of the tacky plug ropes through the push hook and insert into the hole. Then use the box cutter to trim the exposed plug rope flush with the tire. Inflate the tire and be on your way.

The cost of the pump and repair kit is around $20. I keep this setup in both cars. I have AAA service but I can't justify waiting around an hour or more just to have them change my tire. And this is a permanent fix. Happy motoring.

"Burns" rubber

" I've never considered myself to be all that conservative, but it seems the more liberal some people get the more conservative I become. "

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If you do that Larry then you're one flat away from feeling like a genius. I couldn't pat myself on the back enough after fixing my own flat on the spot. I was grinning the whole time. I almost didn't even care that I had a flat. Here's a good one: One time I was on a long trip and it was late (11:00pm)...I get a flat...Oh great...I can call AAA but all the service stations are closed so what's the point since no one can fix the flat...and I'm not going to get very far on a donut (although some cops would disagree ;) )...fortunately I have everything to fix my flat while it's still on the rim. Once again I'm grinning. It's that good.

"Burns" rubber

" I've never considered myself to be all that conservative, but it seems the more liberal some people get the more conservative I become. "

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I know what you mean. However, the newer compressors are much faster and have a much higher psi rating than the older ones. Takes me about 10 minutes to fully inflate a flat. Total time from start to finish is about 15 minutes. Not too shabby time wise and you get to drive on the original tire. One of the pumps came from Napa and the other from Target. Both about $15 and well over 100 psi (160psi I believe).

"Burns" rubber

" I've never considered myself to be all that conservative, but it seems the more liberal some people get the more conservative I become. "

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I have one of those compressors also, but what is that tacky rope plug you are talking about? Does it insert into the tire easily?

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

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How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

Cadillac History & Specifications Year by Year  http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/index.htm

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This article has pics: http://www.alpharubicon.com/bovstuff/tirepluguzi.htm

Here is a link to one example of a tire patch kit on Amazon:

Bruce

2016 Cadillac ATS-V gray/black

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Most repair kits today don't contain rubber cement (not needed) because the rope cords have a rubber coating on them that seals the hole once inserted. The awl is used to make sure that the hole is cleared of any debris and obstructions prior to the rubberized rope cord being inserted. It's really as easy as the directions state.

"Burns" rubber

" I've never considered myself to be all that conservative, but it seems the more liberal some people get the more conservative I become. "

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Well, in all honesty, it's not really rubbery but rather more like rubbery tar. Trust me.... once you've used this "newer" stuff you'll see what I mean. The rubber cement isn't necessary and is one less step that won't be missed. It slides in rather easily. If you have your tire(s) professionally fixed then note that they will use the same stuff that I previously mentioned. Some of my good friends are mechanics and I've been to plenty of tire fixing parties. But as always...your money, your tire, your choice.

"Burns" rubber

" I've never considered myself to be all that conservative, but it seems the more liberal some people get the more conservative I become. "

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I did not realize this was a new type of plug. Never seen these. Most tire places I have been to refuse to plug them. They all want to patch 'em. They claim safety. I have yet to have a problem with any tire I have plugged, and I have plugged a lot. My wife is a nail magnet.

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Your wife is a nail magnet????

I'm happy for ya, but I didn't need to know that.... :lol:

Sorry, I couldn't resist.

I hadn't seen this "newer"plug thing either... very good info....

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The shop manual says:

Important:

• NEVER repair tires worn to the tread indicators 1.59 mm (2/32") remaining depth).

• NEVER repair tires with a tread puncture larger than 6.35 mm (1/4").

• NEVER substitute an inner tube for a permissible or non-permissible repair.

• NEVER perform an outside-in tire repair (plug only, on the wheel).

• Every tire must be removed from the wheel for proper inspection and repair.

• Regardless of the type of repair used, the repair must seal the innerliner and fill the injury.

• Consult with repair material supplier/manufacturer for repair unit application procedures and repair tools/repair material recommendations

then details how to take the tire off the wheel and patch from the inside. They point to http://www.rma.org for more tire repair information.

Bruce

2016 Cadillac ATS-V gray/black

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