35 posts in this topic

I recently replaced all four shocks/struts with new ones from Arnott. The message "Service Ride Control" still comes up every time I start my car and I know the reason could be non-working solenoids, sensors etc. But as I replaced the shocks and the old suspension system is no longer operational, I like to get rid of that annoying message. I searched the whole net for an answer.

Could anyone help me? How can I bypass and permanently delete "Service Ride Control" on a Cadillac Seville STS 1994?

Thanks a lot in advance!

Best regards.

Fred from Sweden

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What diagnostic codes are set in the system? Post the codes and they will point to the area that is causing the problem.


Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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Hello! Sorry for a very late reply, I never received notice by e-mail. However, I pulled the codes and they're all history:

Code P052 History (PCM Keep Alive Memory Reset)

Code P071 History (Intermittent Manifold Absoulute Pressure)

Code P109 History (PCM Keep Alive Memory Reset)

Code I052 History

No ACP Codes

No SIR Codes

No TCS Codes

Code S103 History

Code S036 History

Code S044 History

Code S050 History

Code S061 History

Code S063 History

PCM?

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Code S103 History - I couldn't find anything on this code.

Code S036 History - Electronic level control compressor short to ground/open.

Code S044 History - Lift or Drive signal fault.

Code S050 History - Road sensing suspension module fault.

Code S061 History - Right front position sensor fault.

Code S063 History - Right rear position sensor fault.

Since the codes are history codes, I'd clear them and see if any return. You might want to check to make sure the electrical connectors on the shocks are plugged in fully.


Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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Code S103 History - I couldn't find anything on this code.

Code S036 History - Electronic level control compressor short to ground/open.

Code S044 History - Lift or Drive signal fault.

Code S050 History - Road sensing suspension module fault.

Code S061 History - Right front position sensor fault.

Code S063 History - Right rear position sensor fault.

Since the codes are history codes, I'd clear them and see if any return. You might want to check to make sure the electrical connectors on the shocks are plugged in fully.

Thanks for the advice. I cleared the history, drove it for 20 km and ended up with these codes:

Code S061 Current

Code S063 Current

Edited by Frep

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.. And the sensors (as the codes are for) doesn't have any function due to the recent replacement of the whole suspension system. Anyone know how to bypass "Service Ride Control" or simply put these two codes out?

Code S061 Current

Code S063 Current

Code S103 History - I couldn't find anything on this code.

Code S036 History - Electronic level control compressor short to ground/open.

Code S044 History - Lift or Drive signal fault.

Code S050 History - Road sensing suspension module fault.

Code S061 History - Right front position sensor fault.

Code S063 History - Right rear position sensor fault.

Since the codes are history codes, I'd clear them and see if any return. You might want to check to make sure the electrical connectors on the shocks are plugged in fully.

Thanks for the advice. I cleared the history, drove it for 20 km and ended up with these codes:

Code S061 Current

Code S063 Current

Edited by Frep

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If the codes refers to the sensors that detect pitch/yaw of the car, there is a way to defeat them. Barry94 developed a circuit and I think it is posted in the archives. If the code refers to the actuators on the struts, I'd make sure the resistor modules are plugged in properly and making good contact.


Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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You do need the position sensors for all four wheels with the passive shocks. They are used by the ABS and traction control.


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-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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You do need the position sensors for all four wheels with the passive shocks. They are used by the ABS and traction control.

The position sensors are not the sensors in the wheel bearings for the ABS. The position sensors are at each corner of the chassis and detect body roll/sway and feed that data to the module that controls the dampener valves on the shocks/struts to stiffen or soften the ride.


Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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I believe that the EBTCM uses the wheel height sensors to estimate downforce on the wheels for ABS and TC.


CTS-V_Dashboard.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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I believe that the EBTCM uses the wheel height sensors to estimate downforce on the wheels for ABS and TC.

I see .. Well, I've also understood the sensors are there for the suspension system only. Thanks for the advice about Barrys method but I do believe it's kinda complex. But I might give it a try. It seems to be the only way to bypass it (except buying new sensors, of course).

If anyone got an easier fix for the "Service Ride Control"-message, pls tell!

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Barry94 developed a circuit to bypass the height sensors. Very simple circuit - a search in the archives should produce the schematic.

The stabilitrak system might use the height sensors but that's not an issue on a '94 car as Stabilitrak was not offered then.


Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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If the ABS/TC doesn't use them, then they are surplus once the ride height leveler is gone.


CTS-V_Dashboard.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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If the ABS/TC doesn't use them, then they are surplus once the ride height leveler is gone.

Thanks for your opinions. I might try fixing the circuit as Barry94 described, found his post. I'm thinking that this "Service Ride Control" message probably appears on every single car that has 60.000 miles or more .. Or am I wrong? Does people use to solve this error by replacing RSS parts or do they simply ignore this message? Just thinking.

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If the ABS/TC doesn't use them, then they are surplus once the ride height leveler is gone.

I'm thinking that this "Service Ride Control" message probably appears on every single car that has 60.000 miles or more .. Or am I wrong? Does people use to solve this error by replacing RSS parts or do they simply ignore this message? Just thinking.

My '97 STS never displayed the SERVICE RIDE CONTROL message - It had 172,000+ miles on it when I replaced the original rear shocks. The front struts are still original and the car has 180,500 miles on it. I had to replace the rear shocks not due to anything with the ride control system but it was the air bladders that were rotted and the car would not level out.

Since you have two error codes that show position sensors, I would get a hold of a shop manual and perform the troubleshooting steps listed for each code. The issue may be something simple such as a wire that is chafed or connector plugs that are not making proper contact., etc.


Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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If the ABS/TC doesn't use them, then they are surplus once the ride height leveler is gone.

I'm thinking that this "Service Ride Control" message probably appears on every single car that has 60.000 miles or more .. Or am I wrong? Does people use to solve this error by replacing RSS parts or do they simply ignore this message? Just thinking.

My '97 STS never displayed the SERVICE RIDE CONTROL message - It had 172,000+ miles on it when I replaced the original rear shocks. The front struts are still original and the car has 180,500 miles on it. I had to replace the rear shocks not due to anything with the ride control system but it was the air bladders that were rotted and the car would not level out.

Since you have two error codes that show position sensors, I would get a hold of a shop manual and perform the troubleshooting steps listed for each code. The issue may be something simple such as a wire that is chafed or connector plugs that are not making proper contact., etc.

Yeah, good idea. I will. A bit strange that both sensors on the right side is out while the left side seems to be intact .. Do you think they are independent of each other?

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I bought my 1997 Eldorado new and just sold it, and never, never did I get the Service Ride Control message. I will say that it was originally driven in the L.A. area mostly, and that we moved to the Philly area in late 2000, and that it has been garaged at night since then. This means that the undercarriage has had no brine mush stuck or frozen to it and such, and it has had no undercar problems other than needing struts and shocks at 150,000 miles (actually long overdue!) and the front hub bearings going out at 161,000 miles.


CTS-V_Dashboard.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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I bought my 1997 Eldorado new and just sold it, and never, never did I get the Service Ride Control message. I will say that it was originally driven in the L.A. area mostly, and that we moved to the Philly area in late 2000, and that it has been garaged at night since then. This means that the undercarriage has had no brine mush stuck or frozen to it and such, and it has had no undercar problems other than needing struts and shocks at 150,000 miles and the front hub bearings going out at 161,000 miles.

Alright, I see. Roads in Nevada and California are more or less like runways. Over here, in Scandinavia, the roads can be quite bumpy with lots of damaged sections. The SRC message is very common and I would say 90% av the cars I've met so far has it. But unfortunately, I never pulled codes out of them so I can't say it's the sensors in those cases. My car has been driven in sub-arctic north Sweden for much of it's lifetime. Snowstorms and temperatures around -35 degrees is not that uncommon. It might be the cause. Just speculating. But it's very interesting when it comes to this type of suspension systems, I've seen them fail on Mercedes S-class, SL-class, BMW 7-series, Jaguars, Lincolns and even Volvos.

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The front wheel height sensors *are* used by the ABS. From the 1997 FSM page 5E2-4 in the ABS/TCS/ICCS section:

NORMAL FORCE

Normal Force information is a function of the height of each front wheel relative to the body. Normal Force information is sent from the CVRSS controller to the EBTCM via two dedicated data lines, and reflects the load at each front wheel. The EBTCM uses normal force information to detect rough road conditions while braking, eliminating false unwanted ABS cycling. This allows more aggressive braking when stopping on rough roads.

The CVRSS module is the center of the RSS system, which operates the electronic shocks. Without the electronic shocks, it apparently only provides road force data for the ABS system from the ride height sensors, which are connected to it. The 1997 FSM that I use is for E/K platforms, i.e. all Sevilles, Eldorados, and Devilles for the 1997 model year. The write-ups distinguish between the models when appropriate, and note when certain options are involved. For example, the end of page 5E2-3 and beginning of page 5E2-4 says that Stabilitrak®, which is called ICCS (Integrated Chassis Control System) in the FSM, has two levels, ICCS1 of which uses the wheel speeds and steering angle information and is standard on the SLS and is *not* advertised as Stabilitrak®, and ICCS2 which uses a lateral accelerometer and a yaw rate gyro. ICCS2 is standard on the STS, ETC and Concours and is advertised as Stabiltrak®.

There is no distinction about models and options in the discussion of how the ABS uses data from the CVRSS in the EBTCM in ABS operation, so that applies for all models and options in the E/K platforms for 1997.


CTS-V_Dashboard.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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I bought my 1997 Eldorado new and just sold it, and never, never did I get the Service Ride Control message. I will say that it was originally driven in the L.A. area mostly, and that we moved to the Philly area in late 2000, and that it has been garaged at night since then. This means that the undercarriage has had no brine mush stuck or frozen to it and such, and it has had no undercar problems other than needing struts and shocks at 150,000 miles and the front hub bearings going out at 161,000 miles.

Alright, I see. Roads in Nevada and California are more or less like runways. Over here, in Scandinavia, the roads can be quite bumpy with lots of damaged sections. The SRC message is very common and I would say 90% av the cars I've met so far has it. But unfortunately, I never pulled codes out of them so I can't say it's the sensors in those cases. My car has been driven in sub-arctic north Sweden for much of it's lifetime. Snowstorms and temperatures around -35 degrees is not that uncommon. It might be the cause. Just speculating. But it's very interesting when it comes to this type of suspension systems, I've seen them fail on Mercedes S-class, SL-class, BMW 7-series, Jaguars, Lincolns and even Volvos.

You are very kind in referring to roads in L.A. as "more or less like runways." I can tell you stories about waviness, such as once when my wife and I were out for a motorcycle ride on our 1975 Honda CBF750, then about 20 years old, and riding up IH 605 in Cerritos on such a wavy surface. We passed a small sport-utility vehicle, a Suzuki or Chevy Geo I believe, and the wavy road surface had that car bucking like a bronco. The driver was having visible difficulty holding on, while our old motorcycle with two aboard handled the waviness easily. And, there are cracks, potholes, and other difficulties too.

The undercar problems are not due to the rough roads so much as the salt included with the ice when it sticks to the underside of the car. The results of that come from brine seeping through bearing seals and such, causing failure in sensors, shocks and struts, and even suspension bushings. This is just my opinion based on what I see in undercar problems in the U.S. salt belt versus the sun belt. You can minimize these problems by garaging your car at night if the garage temperature is 5 C or higher so that the salty ice melts off the underside of the car and it dries out overnight. Or, if you don't have a garage for the car that is above freezing at night, you can wash off the underside of your car at a car-wash once a week or so. Cadillac, BMW, Mercedes, Volvo, Saab, Toyota, Nissan, Fiat, Renault, Yugo, Rolls Royce, Trabant, whatever, will benefit from keeping the salt mush from living under your car all winter.


CTS-V_Dashboard.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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Does it mean I can't work on the sensors as described by Barry94? Will I disconnect important parts of the ABS system if I do so? I'm currently out of town without my manuals etc. As KHE earlier wrote, the Stabilitrak was new for model year 1997, right.

So there are crappy road conditions over there also? :) With a trip from L.V. to St. George, Utah fresh in mind I see American road conditions like paradise.

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I'm not sure how the information that Jim posted from the 1997 manual pertains to the 1994 model. 1996 was a significant redesign of the interior and many of the electrical systems and that carried over to 1997 with the introduction of new systems such as the rainsense wipers and stabilitrak system.

I do not believe Barry94 lost his ABS or traction control functions. I would at least troubleshoot the system before installing workarounds.

The crappy road conditions are predominately where there is a freeze-thaw cycle.


Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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....The crappy road conditions are predominately where there is a freeze-thaw cycle.

With the exception of Louisiana.

Jim

Drive your car.

Use your cell phone.

CHOOSE ONE !

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I think that ABS and its use of the front wheel height sensors probably applies to the 1994 model. I think that in making my case I was too verbose and came across as vague. The ABS system, in particular the EBTCM and its associated valve body and pump are Bosch parts that probably didn't change much with the OBD I to OBD II changeover in 1995. The EBTCM comes in two flavors for hardware, those that have a relay that controls electronic suspension and those that do not have the relay that controls the electronic suspension but they are otherwise identical. Stabilitrak includes two more sensors and the software in the EBTCM to implement their inputs to add Stabilitrak functionality were new for 1997. But this has little to do with ABS/TCS.


CTS-V_Dashboard.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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If someone likes to disable the suspension system on 1993-1996 Seville after installing passive shocks, a jumper needs to be installed on every corner (part nr. 88961530). If the car got the Speed Sensitive Suspension this will do the trick according to an old bulletin. But with the RSS system, it's not that easy and the module (located in the trunk) needs to be flashed using a GM Tech 2 device (not for sure it'll work that way either).

The bulletin is also for Allante, Deville and Eldorado from the 90's among others. Send me a PM if you need instructions on how to get rid of that annoying message. On some models, Tech 2 isn't needed which makes it quite simple!

I will just try to shake 'n wake my right sensors and/or cleaning the solenoids or something. Wish me luck, might be needed ..

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