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What is the leaking part of my 2000 SLS?


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2000 SLS - Cooling leak - pouring out.

It's coming from a metal tube. The metal tube connects to a rubber tube that runs from the lower passenger side of the radiator - then runs up to the top of the motor. That metal tube is rusted out. What is that metal tube?

OK - turns out it's an alternator cooler line. Can I just bypass the alternator-cooling and plug the port on the radiator or the hose itself?

Thanks as always.215393d1400781775-what-leaking-bc98025.g

Edited by jerrycpny
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Water cooled alternator? I thought all of those were recalled. You may be able to get it fixed for free by GM.

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Pretty sure those were all converted back to a standard alt.

Any cooling tubes or plumbing would likely be no longer available..

If it's a safety issue it may be a covered repair....or....maybe not if it's considered to be 'Old GM'.

I have not found the bulletin yet on it. Maybe I'm wrong.

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It looks as if they were used from '98-2000. My '01 had a air cooled version.

Maybe it was simply a lack of parts. I have heard of dealers changing alot of them over to air cooled.

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I did a series of searches on the GM Service Information DVD for 2011 which would have the TSB on any recall of the water cooled generators and I don't see one. Unless Logan turns up something, I would replace the rusted pipe with a new stainless steel one and forget it.

CTS-V_LateralGs_6-2018_tiny.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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Upon doing some looking...it appears the 'recall' is a old wives tale. There appears to be no recall for the water cooled alternator.

The water cooled alternator did disappear as fast as it appeared...only used 1998-2000. From that you will have to draw your own conclusion.

Kinda like the trunk vents used on all 1971 GM cars....disappeared as fast as they appeared..

post-2-0-51361100-1401116013_thumb.jpg

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Alternator cooling is a big problem for cars with large electrical loads and high underhood temperatures and in hot weather. The alternator capacity can decrease drastically when it gets too hot. Temperature decreases the magnetic properties of the armature, and increase in resistance in the windings and field coils brings on more heat as well as reduces output. The performance of the regulator an diodes is compromised at high temperatures. Traditional air cooling can be ineffective if the air available is also hot, which is why the Northstar puts it low where it gets more air from under the car. But a water-cooled alternator is a superior solution, in theory. Execution? Well, using it only three model years says that there was a reason, probably that air cooling was "good enough" and it's an expensive way to go.

CTS-V_LateralGs_6-2018_tiny.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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  • 3 weeks later...

jerrycpny,

I have a 99 STS which lost it's alternator last year. I did not want an Autozone rebuild so I took it to a local guy. He said they are so rare, he would not be able to buy the parts, however, he could get me a rebuilt with all new parts for $180. I am in Ohio. I took out the old one, which is no easy task. When I replaced it, I replaced the metal cooling line at the bottom, which appeared fine, but was 15 years old. I did it because my old '99 STS had that part fail in the winter, and it was a cold time replacing it. Since I had done it before, I knew it was an easy fix. What I used was bendable steel brake line! I cut it to length, used a tubing bender, and slightly flared the ends to keep the hoses in place on each end. I was unable to locate new factory pre-formed 3/8" diameter hoses which were attached, so I made my own. I bought the best hose from Napa and some Goodyear hose 'EZ-Coils' which are bendable and will hold any shape. They are about $7 each and I had to use two or three. They appeared to be chrome plated, but I sprayed a coat of Rustoleum to increase their life. A year later the alternator failed. I was not happy, but the shop warranted the alternator, so I replaced it again. This time, I re-used the bendable springs, which still held the paint, but I replaced the hose for a few dollars. I figured I got my moneys worth and would not have to replace the hoses again. The bendable brake line looked perfect after one year!

Good luck!

Ohio Jim

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