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How the Earth survived its birth


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http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/eart...aas-100107.html

WASHINGTON — Just how Earth survived the process of its birth without suffering an early demise by falling into the sun has been something of a mystery to astronomers, but a new model has figured out what protected our planet when it was still a vulnerable, baby world.

In short, temperature differences in the space around the sun, 4.6 billion years ago, caused Earth to migrate outward as much as gravity was trying to pull it inward, and so the fledgling world found equilibrium in what we now know to be a very habitable orbit.

Planets like the Earth are thought to form from condensing clouds of gas and dust surrounding stars. The material in these disks gradually clumps together, eventually forming planetesimals – the asteroid-sized building blocks that eventually collide to form full-fledged planets.

As the planets are forming, they are also thought to migrate within the surrounding dust disk. The classic picture of this planet migration suggests that planets like (and including) the Earth should have plummeted into the sun while they were still planetesimals.

"Well, this contradicts basic observational evidence, like We. Are. Here," said astronomer Moredecai-Mark Mac Low of the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

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http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/eart...aas-100107.html

WASHINGTON — Just how Earth survived the process of its birth without suffering an early demise by falling into the sun has been something of a mystery to astronomers, but a new model has figured out what protected our planet when it was still a vulnerable, baby world.

In short, temperature differences in the space around the sun, 4.6 billion years ago, caused Earth to migrate outward as much as gravity was trying to pull it inward, and so the fledgling world found equilibrium in what we now know to be a very habitable orbit.

Planets like the Earth are thought to form from condensing clouds of gas and dust surrounding stars. The material in these disks gradually clumps together, eventually forming planetesimals – the asteroid-sized building blocks that eventually collide to form full-fledged planets.

As the planets are forming, they are also thought to migrate within the surrounding dust disk. The classic picture of this planet migration suggests that planets like (and including) the Earth should have plummeted into the sun while they were still planetesimals.

"Well, this contradicts basic observational evidence, like We. Are. Here," said astronomer Moredecai-Mark Mac Low of the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

I'm guessing that requires a little more thought . . .

After all, we IS! Thank you, Moredecai.

As an aside, however, astrophysicists believe the moon was once so close to the earth that 1,100 foot tidal waves were common. If that's true, it's not too difficult to understand how ocean-life became land-life.

Regards,

Warren

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There is no means of avoiding the final collapse of a boom brought about by credit expansion. The alternative is only whether the crisis should come sooner as the result of a voluntary abandonment of further credit expansion, or later as a final and total catastrophe of the currency system involved. - Ludwig von Mises

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So you're saying the first land creatures were surfers? Dude!

Well, I hadn't thought of it quite that way, but YES! :D:D:D

Regards,

Warren

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There is no means of avoiding the final collapse of a boom brought about by credit expansion. The alternative is only whether the crisis should come sooner as the result of a voluntary abandonment of further credit expansion, or later as a final and total catastrophe of the currency system involved. - Ludwig von Mises

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On the History Channel the other night there was a program discussing the origin of the universe and the various scientific theories. While I'm not anti-science, I must say that it's obvious that scientists are really clueless when it comes to the universe, which is manifest by the various theories they come up with to try to explain flaws in existing theories. For example, at one time it was thought that the Big Bang was the only bang. However, when it became evident that the Big Bang was likely not the one and only, another theory was proposed that there was a second bang, called the Little Bang. Also, one of the biggest flaws with the Big Bang is that the universe is symmetrical, meaning it's not malformed, which is what should have happened if there was indeed one huge explosion since explosions do not cause matter to scatter or accelerate at the same speed. Accordingly, scientists had to think of another theory as to why the universe is so uniform and perfectly shaped--I believe oval. I've had a number of discussions on this topic with atheists and I always point out how perfect everything is i.e., the placement of Earth in the Milky Way, the perfect distance Earth is from the sun, and the fact that Earth itself is unlike any other planet. Obviously, atheists don't want to hear the perfect scenario argument because they will not accept such an argument proves the existence of God not matter how ridiculous it is that the universe suddenly appeared without cause, which in turn caused life to spring without cause. I always ask them to explain the origin of energy since according to First Law of Thermodynamics, energy cannot be created or destroyed--Therefore, where did it come from?

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If I may add my 2 cents to this... I don't personally believe in any religion or god, but at the same time I don't completely dismiss the idea that other peoples' religious beliefs COULD be possible. I also don't completely believe in or dismiss any one theory as to why we are here, or how we all came about to be where we are. (by we, I mean the earth and everything in connection with it) The way I see it is we are what we are, and we have to accept the world for what it is while we are here. I don't know for sure where we originated, and I have accepted the fact that it is very unlikely for anyone to solve that mystery during my lifetime here on earth, so why should I worry about it? Knowing where I came from isn't going to change who I am or how I live my life, so I am just going to enjoy the life I have while I am here. Would I like to know? Absolutely! But I'm pretty sure I never will. This may sound selfish to some people I suppose, but it's just my opinion.

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  • 2 weeks later...
If I may add my 2 cents to this... I don't personally believe in any religion or god, but at the same time I don't completely dismiss the idea that other peoples' religious beliefs COULD be possible. I also don't completely believe in or dismiss any one theory as to why we are here, or how we all came about to be where we are. (by we, I mean the earth and everything in connection with it) The way I see it is we are what we are, and we have to accept the world for what it is while we are here. I don't know for sure where we originated, and I have accepted the fact that it is very unlikely for anyone to solve that mystery during my lifetime here on earth, so why should I worry about it? Knowing where I came from isn't going to change who I am or how I live my life, so I am just going to enjoy the life I have while I am here. Would I like to know? Absolutely! But I'm pretty sure I never will. This may sound selfish to some people I suppose, but it's just my opinion.

I'm Christian, but I must say that I find it reasonable to a large degree for someone to be an atheist since, let's be honest, if God exists, He is silent and does not manifest Himself before His creation in an obvious way. It has been thousands of years and God is nowhere to be seen.

However, on the other hand, I do think it's absurd to believe that the universe was created without cause and that it appeared by sheer coincidence. The truth is that scientists of today are no closer to understanding the origin of the universe than their colleagues of 1000 years ago. What is believed about the universe's origin is based on speculation and theory, which change from one theory to the next based on scientists debunking a previous theory. I believe there are simply too many indications that there is a supernatural creator.

Then we come to the question as to whether Judaism and Christianity have any basis in fact. In other words, what is the evidence for the stories in the Bible? There are historical evidences to support much of what is stated in both the Hebrew scriptures and New Testament. However, the overarching question concerning the existence and stories of the Hebrew prophets and Jesus are still very illusive. To this end, the only circumstantial evidence we have concerning the existence of Jesus is via Roman and a Jewish historian (Josephus) that speak about Jesus as being a real person. However, again, let's be honest, there is scant secular evidence concerning Jesus as far as Roman history--again, we have some Roman historians to speak of and some archeological evidence showing that certain historical places did exist and that certain claims made can be proven to be true. However, when it comes to Jesus, at this point, us Christians must believe through faith.

The one thing that I have researched is the Shroud of Turin, which to me is possibly a supernatural creation. I'm aware of the argument that it cannot be from the time that Jesus allegedly lived because radio-carbon dating indicates that it's from the medieval period. However, there are other experts that refute the dating method and actually raised legitimate issues as to why the dating method is seriously flawed. In other words, the claim that the Shroud is from the medieval period is not a settled issue among scholars. However, there are several interesting aspects about the Shroud that give me reason to lean in favor of believing that it's supernatural rather than some forgery or some creation of some medieval artist. But again, even as a Christian, I wish there were more things that I could point to as evidence that Jesus existed and indeed the events described in the New Testament are true. Over the years archeologists have unearthed evidences proving Biblical accounts to be accurate, however, it may be that a lot of evidence has been lost due to events that transpired mere decades after the death of Christ, including the burning of Jerusalem in 70 A.D. by the Romans.

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I wouldn't really call myself an Atheist. I don't like to label myself at all when it comes to religion, but if I were going to I would call myself Agnostic, if anything. Atheists completely deny the existence of God, or a God. I don't. I just choose not to live my life "following" one. I guess the simplest way for me to put it really is this: I believe that there COULD be a god, but I don't know for sure, therefore, I feel that while I am here I should live my life the way I want to. I am human and am capable of knowing right from wrong on my own, and I don't feel that I need to have faith in a higher power in order to live a happy, fulfilling life. I do not dismiss anyone else's beliefs, nor do I consider myself "high and mighty" for the way that I believe. I am an extremely open minded person, and would never try to talk anyone out of believing what they want to. I believe that good people come in all forms, colors, religions, shapes, and sizes, and I would never single anyone out based on any of these things.

And for the record, I do believe that Jesus did exist. I just don't know about the rest of the story.

I often wonder where we go or what we do after we die. There are so many theories about that, but it's not as if any of us can come back to talk about it afterward....or can we?

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I wouldn't really call myself an Atheist. I don't like to label myself at all when it comes to religion, but if I were going to I would call myself Agnostic, if anything. Atheists completely deny the existence of God, or a God. I don't. I just choose not to live my life "following" one. I guess the simplest way for me to put it really is this: I believe that there COULD be a god, but I don't know for sure, therefore, I feel that while I am here I should live my life the way I want to. I am human and am capable of knowing right from wrong on my own, and I don't feel that I need to have faith in a higher power in order to live a happy, fulfilling life. I do not dismiss anyone else's beliefs, nor do I consider myself "high and mighty" for the way that I believe. I am an extremely open minded person, and would never try to talk anyone out of believing what they want to. I believe that good people come in all forms, colors, religions, shapes, and sizes, and I would never single anyone out based on any of these things.

And for the record, I do believe that Jesus did exist. I just don't know about the rest of the story.

I often wonder where we go or what we do after we die. There are so many theories about that, but it's not as if any of us can come back to talk about it afterward....or can we?

I agree with your views with respect to not living a life where I look for fault in others and try to convince them that they are not living the way "God" wants them to live. Everyone must make decisions for themselves. What Jesus taught was to love each other. In other words, the "law of love", which is His most important commandment. So I try to focus on this aspect of my beliefs rather than preaching hell and damnation to everyone who is not Christian. Frankly, anyone who is truly a loving person and, as a Christian, has Godly love towards others, will be horrified at the thought that some will suffer eternal damnation assuming such a thing does exist. To this end, I agree with you that good people (in a human/imperfect sense) come from all different backgrounds. Clearly, people of religious faith do not have a monopoly on piousness nor have any inherent right to deserve favor over another. All of us are in the same boat.

I sometimes post in forums discussing religion and in so doing have said to fellow Christians that any Christian who finds it easy to speak of hell and condemn others needs to look at oneself in the mirror and pluck the log out of his or her eye first. It should be the desire of every Christian that all people be "saved", not just a select few. Frankly, many who are not Christian live more faithfully to the teachings of Jesus (though they do not believe in Him) than those who purport to be Christian. A world that is full of condemners is a world full of hypocrites!

My view is simple--If Christ exists (and I believe He does) then let Him be the judge. While, as a Christian, I will discuss and debate what the New Testament does and does not say, I don't find that it's my job to walk around telling non-Christians that they are doomed. From my perspective, I want all of us to be "saved" and be one big happy family. I can only hope that there will be more revelation from God that will clear the way for humanity to be saved. Clearly, however, it's more important to love one another than to espouse a doctrine of doom. It's easy for people to get caught up on one's religious beliefs and thus forget what it really means to love one another. I believe that those who allow their minds to become consumed with religious legalities and condemnation of others stand to fail to meet basic criteria of the law of love, which is to be patient, kind, and to do no harm to others. Obviously, there are some really bad people and thus one should be practical and circumspect when it comes to reaching out. It's not wrong to shun and protect oneself from evil-minded, ill-tempered, and in general those who have no love in them. After all, there are the good and evil in this world! We need not nor should not keep company with the latter!

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I wouldn't really call myself an Atheist. I don't like to label myself at all when it comes to religion, but if I were going to I would call myself Agnostic, if anything. Atheists completely deny the existence of God, or a God. I don't. I just choose not to live my life "following" one. I guess the simplest way for me to put it really is this: I believe that there COULD be a god, but I don't know for sure, therefore, I feel that while I am here I should live my life the way I want to. I am human and am capable of knowing right from wrong on my own, and I don't feel that I need to have faith in a higher power in order to live a happy, fulfilling life. I do not dismiss anyone else's beliefs, nor do I consider myself "high and mighty" for the way that I believe. I am an extremely open minded person, and would never try to talk anyone out of believing what they want to. I believe that good people come in all forms, colors, religions, shapes, and sizes, and I would never single anyone out based on any of these things.

And for the record, I do believe that Jesus did exist. I just don't know about the rest of the story.

I often wonder where we go or what we do after we die. There are so many theories about that, but it's not as if any of us can come back to talk about it afterward....or can we?

I agree with your views with respect to not living a life where I look for fault in others and try to convince them that they are not living the way "God" wants them to live. Everyone must make decisions for themselves. What Jesus taught was to love each other. In other words, the "law of love", which is His most important commandment. So I try to focus on this aspect of my beliefs rather than preaching hell and damnation to everyone who is not Christian. Frankly, anyone who is truly a loving person and, as a Christian, has Godly love towards others, will be horrified at the thought that some will suffer eternal damnation assuming such a thing does exist. To this end, I agree with you that good people (in a human/imperfect sense) come from all different backgrounds. Clearly, people of religious faith do not have a monopoly on piousness nor have any inherent right to deserve favor over another. All of us are in the same boat.

I sometimes post in forums discussing religion and in so doing have said to fellow Christians that any Christian who finds it easy to speak of hell and condemn others needs to look at oneself in the mirror and pluck the log out of his or her eye first. It should be the desire of every Christian that all people be "saved", not just a select few. Frankly, many who are not Christian live more faithfully to the teachings of Jesus (though they do not believe in Him) than those who purport to be Christian. A world that is full of condemners is a world full of hypocrites!

My view is simple--If Christ exists (and I believe He does) then let Him be the judge. While, as a Christian, I will discuss and debate what the New Testament does and does not say, I don't find that it's my job to walk around telling non-Christians that they are doomed. From my perspective, I want all of us to be "saved" and be one big happy family. I can only hope that there will be more revelation from God that will clear the way for humanity to be saved. Clearly, however, it's more important to love one another than to espouse a doctrine of doom. It's easy for people to get caught up on one's religious beliefs and thus forget what it really means to love one another. I believe that those who allow their minds to become consumed with religious legalities and condemnation of others stand to fail to meet basic criteria of the law of love, which is to be patient, kind, and to do no harm to others. Obviously, there are some really bad people and thus one should be practical and circumspect when it comes to reaching out. It's not wrong to shun and protect oneself from evil-minded, ill-tempered, and in general those who have no love in them. After all, there are the good and evil in this world! We need not nor should not keep company with the later!

It's nice to see someone who seems so open minded! I can't stand hypocrisy, yet sadly there are as many hypocrites as there are any other being in the world. I do my best to be kind to everyone, and it doesn't matter if that person turns around and spits in my face, at least I know I tried. I know I'm a good person, a good mom, and a good girlfriend, and knowing that helps me sleep at night. I can have an attitude, but I think the same can be said for anyone. After all, we are only human. I know I'm not perfect, but I make the best of the person I am for myself and those around me.

There is actually a woman who comes to my house once in a while, she's a Jahova's Witness (spelling?). I let her come in and talk to me because she never tries to preach to me. She understands my beliefs, and I understand hers. We are both very open-minded and we just sit and talk about every day things. We have had religious discussions of course, but she doesn't try to sway me. I appreciate people like that.

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