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Hi!

What kind of breaks (rotor+pad) should I use for my Seville? The Raybestos are not very good, I can feel vibration when I push the break pedal at over 60mph. I've only driven them for 7000 miles, maybe they cannot handle the high speeds and the mountain roads on my weekly way.

I'm searching for very good breaks for the front axle (maybe slotted) which can handle my driving conditions smile.gif

I found the AC Delco Durastop (93$ each), Summit Racing Rotor (59$ each), EBC Brakes GD7005 (100$ each) and Baer DecelaRotor OE Replacement Brake Rotors (135$ each).

If anyone knows a dealer that will ship it to Europe cheaper than Rockauto or Summitracing I'd be happy to know!

Thank you!

Chris

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Raybestos is fine. You are experiencing brake shudder. Your post exposed something to me. You said,

"I'm searching for very good breaks for the front axle"

In order for your front brakes to work properly, the rear has to pick up its share of the load. How are your rear brakes? When were they done last?

A true brake job focuses on ALL FOUR corners not just the front.

Did you bleed the system? Air in the rear will weaken their stopping power and put all of the braking on the fronts, overheating them. Once overheated, brake material will transfer to the rotor and you will get the pulsing or shudder.

By buying drilled rotors you will only mask the problem. Tell us more about your system

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

1996 and newer - DTC codes OBD2 >> https://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/gm/obd_codes.htm

How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

Cadillac History & Specifications Year by Year  http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/index.htm

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I've changed front and rear at the same time, but I think the front breaks are worse than the rear ones (feels like all the vibration is coming from the front). Break fluid was also changed!

Maybe I should change front and rear, but I'm not sure that Raybestos rotors and pads are the best sollution for my car.

I wonder how it is possible that after 7000 miles the breaks are that worse...

I want to order something that will work longer than the last ones did, because shipping is more expensive than the material :(

When my BMW had the problem with beak vibration I could feel with my fingers that the rotor was "bad", but the rotors of my Cadillac feel fine?! Could the vibration be caused by something else?

Edited by -Chris-
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If your caliper slides are not free and they have not been greased properly, your brakes will wear prematurely

Personally I always use AC Delco pads as they are validated for the car. Recently I used a premium ceramic pad and they worked fine, they didnt dust up the wheels BUT, they were not so great until they were warmed up

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

1996 and newer - DTC codes OBD2 >> https://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/gm/obd_codes.htm

How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

Cadillac History & Specifications Year by Year  http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/index.htm

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The calipers have been tested and the change was done properly. Maybe I got the wrong rear rotors, here is a picture of what they look like:

felge6.jpg

As you can see, they don't break on the whole disc, half the rotor seems to be "unused"? Could that be the reason why the front breaks can overheat and in consequence cause the vibration?

I got the rear discs from a local dealer, the front rotors and pads are Raybestos I ordered by myself in the US.

If the rear breaks caused my front breaks to get bad I will ask the dealer for new ones that will fit or to give me the money back and then order everything from AC Delco (durastop).

Would AC Delco semi metallic or ceramic pads be better?

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That looks normal

It could be that you just overheated the brakes and as a result transferred brake material to the rotors

I found this see if this is any help

Info - Brake Align System for Brake Rotor Lateral Runout Correction #01-05-23-001A - (Mar 19, 2003)

Brake Align® System for Brake Rotor Lateral Runout Correction 2003 and Prior Passenger Cars

This bulletin is being revised to add model years. Please discard Corporate Bulletin Number 01-05-23-001 (Section 05 - Brakes).

This bulletin is being issued to update General Motors' position on correcting brake rotor lateral runout (Refer to Corporate Bulletin Number 00-05-22-002B for additional brake rotor service procedures).

Important

Certain conditions may apply to individual vehicles regarding specific repairs. Refer to those specific repairs in applicable service bulletins. Make sure other possible sources of brake pulsation, such as ABS pedal feedback, have been addressed before checking rotor runout.

Anytime a new or refinished rotor is installed on a vehicle, the rotor must have .050 mm (.002 in) or less of lateral runout. This specification is important to prevent comebacks for brake pulsation. Until now, the only acceptable methods to correct brake rotor runout were to index or replace the rotor or to refinish the rotor using an on-vehicle brake lathe.

GM has approved a new technology for the correction of lateral runout on new or refinished rotors. This new method is called Brake Align®*. It will allow the technician to meet the .050 mm (.002 in) or less requirement for lateral runout by installing a specially selected, tapered correction plate between the rotor and the hub. The Brake Align® Correction system does NOT require the use of an on-vehicle brake lathe to correct for lateral runout.

*We believe this source and their products to be reliable. There may be additional manufacturers of such products. General Motors does not endorse, indicate any preference for or assume any responsibility for the products from this firm or for any such items which may be available from other sources.

The Brake Align® Starter Kit will include an ample supply of Correction Plates, in various correction sizes, that will cover most current GM passenger car applications. It will also include a Brake Align® tool kit containing a dial indicator and retaining washers along with other useful tools.

Service Procedure Follow all the procedures referred to in Corporate Bulletin Number 00-05-22-002B. Dealers who have purchased the Brake Align® Starter Kit may use the following simplified runout correction procedure:

    The existing rotors must first be machined on an approved, well-maintained bench lathe to guarantee smooth, flat, and parallel surfaces. Should the rotors require replacement, please note that it is not necessary to machine new rotors. Make sure all the mating surfaces of the rotor and the hub are clean, using the J 42450-A Wheel Hub Cleaning Kit. Mount the new or refinished rotor onto the vehicle hub using the retaining washers provided in the kit. Do not reinstall the caliper or wheel at this time. Tighten all the wheel nuts to the proper specification, using J 39544 Torque Socket or the equivalent. Fasten the dial indicator to the steering knuckle so that the indicator needle contacts the rotor friction surface approximately 12.7 mm (1/2 in) from the rotor's outer edge. Rotate the rotor and observe the total lateral runout. Index the rotor on the hub to achieve the lowest amount of lateral runout. This will require removal and reassembly of the rotor until the lowest total lateral runout reading is obtained. If this reading is .050 mm (.002 in) or less, the assembled rotor is within specification. The brake system may be reassembled. If total lateral runout is greater than .050 mm (.002 in), proceed with determining the correct Brake Align® Correction as follows:
  • Rotate the rotor to locate the lowest dial indicator reading and set the dial to zero.
  • Rotate the rotor to determine and locate the highest amount of lateral runout. Note the AMOUNT and LOCATION of the "high spot" on the rotor and mark the closest wheel stud relative to this location.

Remove the rotor. Select the appropriate Brake Align® Runout Correction Plate for this vehicle using the included Application Chart. Make sure the selection corrects the amount of runout that was diagnosed.

Important

Never attempt to stack two or more Correction Plates together on one hub.

Never attempt to re-use a previously installed Correction Plate.

Following the Brake Align® procedures and diagram, install the Correction Plate onto the vehicle between the hub and the rotor. The V-notch in the Correction Plate is to be installed and aligned with the noted location of the "high spot" on the vehicle hub and marked wheel stud. Install the rotor onto the vehicle with the Correction Plate placed between the hub and the rotor. Be sure to install the rotor onto the hub in the same location as identified in Step 7. <LI>The rotor should then be secured onto the hub and tightened to the proper specification. The rotor should be dial indicated once more to assure that the rotor is now within specification. The brake system is now ready for the remaining service and assembly. Once the caliper has been installed, check to ensure that the rotor rotates freely

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

1996 and newer - DTC codes OBD2 >> https://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/gm/obd_codes.htm

How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

Cadillac History & Specifications Year by Year  http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/index.htm

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This is a terrific thread for pulsating brakes

http://caddyinfo.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=8887

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

1996 and newer - DTC codes OBD2 >> https://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/gm/obd_codes.htm

How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

Cadillac History & Specifications Year by Year  http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/index.htm

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I installed drilled and slotted rotors with ceramics on my Seville. Made a huge difference in braking power and especially when slowing down on highways and I have no complaints on noise or vibrations to give.

Made the switch 25,000 miles ago and the pads haven't worn down as much as everyone had said they would with having the slotted rotors. I think I paid $110 for all four rotors and $42 for pads front and back.

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