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Engine Swap


Adrian

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The original transmission will bolt right up to a 4.9L. You might have the transmission rebuilt add a Transgo shift kit to help it withstand the extra power. In order to get around the ECM/TBI problem, check into using the Megasquirt system. With this system you can calibrate the original TBI to handle the extra cubic inches. Or simpler yet, just use a carburator. A lot of Fiero Caddy swap guys do this. Good Luck

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Thanks for the suggestions Ed.  I do want to upgrade the transmission along with the engine.  The computer that will control the engine will control the transmission also and will probably cause problems with the engine if the transmission isn't there.  I want to stick with the original fuel injection.  Switching to a carburator would be like switching back to a black and white TV to me.  I just think they are a bit antiquated.

My guess is a FWD C/H-car that was originally equipped with a 3800/4T60E would be a good source for conversion parts (e.g. 1991 Olds Delta 88).

You've got the analogy all wrong! A carburetor is like a mechanical clock versus an electronic one. It will continue to work well with the occasional cleaning; when the digital gives trouble, you're better off buying a new one. :)

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You've got the analogy all wrong! A carburetor is like a mechanical clock versus an electronic one. It will continue to work well with the occasional cleaning; when the digital gives trouble, you're better off buying a new one. :)

Using that analogy, I'd say the carb is more like a sundial. Works great under ideal conditions only and not very adaptable to changes in environment.

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Seems like carburators ocassionally need rebuilt. Carburators also seem much less efficient both in power and fuel mileage.

I usually replace a QuadraJet float and seat when they reach 10-15 years as a matter of preventative maintenance. OEM vacuum breaks last easily over 10 years. How many injectors can you buy for $50? :)

When the 305 engine in the Caprice received fuel injection (previously an E4ME Q-jet), the peak power remained at 170 hp. A fuel injected 1989 Caprice has the same EPA ratings as a carbureted 1987 Brougham (200 lbs heavier!).

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Using that analogy, I'd say the carb is more like a sundial. Works great under ideal conditions only and not very adaptable to changes in environment.

My Q-jet has an aneroid metering adjustment that compensates for changes in altitude and barometric pressure. During warm-up, the choke coil accounts for temperature variation, and once warm, the thermostatic air cleaner maintains the air intake temperature at 120 F. The Computer Command Control (C-3) Q-jets are capable of closed loop operation, using information from a narrow band oxygen sensor. Above idle, a carburetor meters fuel in direct proportion to airflow, making them more adaptable than a speed-density FI setup (like a pre-1996 Northstar). GM used the Q-jet on everything from a 4.1 L Buick V6 to an 8.2 L Cadillac V8.

I stand by my mechanical clock analogy! :)

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