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Excessive Crank Time on 97 STS


tmpafford

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I have been having problems starting my 97 STS. Real long crank time mostly in the morning. Just figured it was my Fuel Pressure Regulator. Took the car in to the dealer to have the fuel rail replaced under the recall and thought I would have them check the excessive crank time also. Was told that it was the Fuel Pump Module and Fuel Filter. The pump module is the problem, the filter is a "might as well" repair. I was quoted about $900 to replace both. (AC blower fan is also out and that is being replaced for about $450.00)

Has anyone else had to do the Fuel Pump Module? What was the cost? Besides dropping the fuel tank and the price of the part, why would it be so expensive? Anyone done the job yourself?

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Dropping the tank and changing the pump is not too bad if you have the ability to get the rear end in the air and a flat surface to work on.

I rolled my Deville up on ramps that were located behind the rear wheels - just backed up and was ready to go once the front wheels were chocked.

Make SURE the tank is a close to 10 miles-from-a gas-station-empty as possible. You'll get a real lesson about the weight of fuel - even though it's lighter than water it still feels like lead.

Short work description - Pull the battery connections off, pull the fuel hose at the filter (or the first connection nearest the tank), loosen the tank fill pipe, evaporative emission line and unplug the pump / fuel gauge connector. Remove any exhaust shields that are around the tank, unbolt the tank straps and lower the tank to the ground.

Wipe all areas with a damp cloth to remove dirt and eliminate any static (bad near gas fumes!) The pump is removed by rotating the locking ring fastener. This can be done with a special wrench or by moderate taps with a section of hardwood and a hammer (careful not to slip and break anything!).

Figure 2 - 3 hours and take your time so you don't break anything. Having someone to help hold the tank during removal / install makes it much easlier.

Hope this helps. :)

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Jhall

"Make SURE the tank is a close to 10 miles-from-a gas-station-empty as possible. You'll get a real lesson about the weight of fuel - even though it's lighter than water it still feels like lead.

I had the unfortunate experience of dropping the tank when it was about 1/3 full....And it is NOT FUN!!...Spent about an hour hand pumping most of the gas out. I still had a fair amount of gas in it when I dropped it...used two jacks with a board on top to support the tank...then lowered each jack inch by inch to get the tank down. Hardest part was A. Removing the filler hose and B. Re-positioning the exhaust shield so I could drop the tank out....Some of the screws are a PITA to get too! Also you may only have a few more chances until it finally goes capoooey....I'd consider fixing it real soon.....Also before my fuel pump went out I didn't really have any cranking problems...It would just stall at idle...and most of the pump failures I have read about include stalling as a common symptom....Are you getting any P057's? Got a AC Delco pump from GMPartsdirect.com for about $250...dealer wanted like $400+ for just the pump...Good luck.

A.J.

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If it was me, I would change the FPR and filter before I let the dealer change the pump module. It might save you $900.00. You would think the Fuel pump module would cause a long crank all the time and not just in the morning. FPR and filter are not that expensive and easy to change yourself. I would go that route before I would let the dealer take my money, but that is just me.

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Does anyone know if they replace the FPR when they replace the fuel rail or do they use the old FPR?

Early on sailors navigated by the stars at night and the North star became the symbol for finding ones way home. Once you know where the Northstar is you can point your ship in the right direction to get home. So the star became a symbol for finding ones way home or more symbolically even finding ones path in life.

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You would think the Fuel pump module would cause a long crank all the time and not just in the morning.

The longest crank time is in the morning. I guess that I crank for about a ten to fifteen count (not seconds, but turns of the engine) other times it is about a five or six count. I have a 1960 Bel Air that starts on a two to three count on the original untouched motor. I would like my STS to do that. I suggested the FPR to the service tech when I took it in for the fuel rail replacement thinking it would be a "while we are in there" replacement. The dealer checked out the FPR and said it was fine. They then looked for other causes and determined it was the fuel pump module.

I have dropped a fuel tank in my old 72 Camaro, and yes fuel IS heavy. I will give it a thought and see if I want to tackle this project.

I still have a front bearing replacement to do.

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tmpafford,

If it is the fuel pump and sending unit (fuel pump module?), you can just buy it through Brasington for about $260 I think( had it done 2 years ago) and have a regular garage install it. Dave the mech did mine at the shop and said it was a breeze and labor was under a $100. But I think you would hear a whining sound if that was the case?

Last year I had some long start up times using bosch plugs. Since the change back to ac delco platinums she fires right up. Report back when you figure it out. Good luck.

"Burns" rubber

" I've never considered myself to be all that conservative, but it seems the more liberal some people get the more conservative I become. "

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Serves me right for not asking more details. Got my car back this morning and the bill was for $900 total for the AC blower motor. The blower PART was $450, labor was $350. Glad now that I did not agree to the $900 fuel pump module! Oil change, radiator flush, EPA fees and taxes took care of the other $100. Raised a little fuss, but it was partly my fault for not asking more questions and partly the tech guys fault for not being clearer. Dealer offered to throw in the oil change and radiator flush to make things better. More than I was expecting, but the dealer was willing to work with a customer.

Played the On Star button game in the XLR. Did not win. :(

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Serves me right for not asking more details. Got my car back this morning and the bill was for $900 total for the AC blower motor. The blower PART was $450, labor was $350. Glad now that I did not agree to the $900 fuel pump module! Oil change, radiator flush, EPA fees and taxes took care of the other $100. Raised a little fuss, but it was partly my fault for not asking more questions and partly the tech guys fault for not being clearer. Dealer offered to throw in the oil change and radiator flush to make things better. More than I was expecting, but the dealer was willing to work with a customer.

Played the On Star button game in the XLR. Did not win. :(

$900 to replace the blower motor????? :blink: It isn't that bad of a job - I did mine in 2 hours in my garage - no need to drop the cradle or cut the housing either.....The motor assembly was $187 from Brasingtons.

Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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Ya, it was excessive, but I was paying for three additional things.

First was the diagnosis. I can't tell you how many times I have bought and replaced parts that I thought were the problem, only to find out that they had nothing to do with the real problem. This board has helped eliminate some of my frustrations.

The second was time. I could have done it myself and saved, but this time I needed to spend those hours on other things. Purchasing the parts, waiting for the part to arrive, driving the car without AC in Houston, and replacing the part would have consumed time that I did not think I could afford to do without right now.

Third is convenience. The dealership is not far from work and I had a company truck to drive while the Caddy was in the shop. I needed to have the fuel rail replaced so I had the AC fixed while it was already in the shop.

The fuel pump assembly costs crossed my imaginary line of do-it-yourself vs mechanic job. My rule is that if the repairs are to be more than say $50 and less than a normal months car payment then have someone else do it. If it is more, weigh the need for the repair with my mechanical skills. If I can do it myself and save half the costs, then I will do it.

I was grateful that the dealership was willing to help my sticker shock by comp-ing the oil change and radiator flush. I know they still made a killing on the part price. I could have shopped around to find a shop to do it cheaper, but then we are back to the time issue.

My wallet is still a little sore, but it is supposed to be in the mid eighties this weekend and with a black on black Caddy, I will not be suffering. I am satisfied.

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