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2000 Deville, How to replace crank shaft position sensors.


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Gentlemen:

In May 2012, I had my indy replace both crankcase position sensors; dealer advised this was not covered under warranty on my new engine. (Code Po386). Seventeen months later, I have since put about 7,000 mile on the car. Now have the same same code showing and hope to have indy lined up to do another install.

Question #1. When doing 2012 install of these parts, "someone" on this list provided me, or directed me to a video of installation procedure and tools required. I recall very long socket extensions were necessary, but can't recall details? I also "think" it called for a 10mm socket? I'd like to get access to that video again. Can anyone proved assistance with this instruction video?

Question #2. This time around, should I use OEM, rather than OEM "Replacement" part that I purchased from local Auto Zone store?

Response to email address is welcome.

Steve in MD.

SMihaly137@aol.com

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The P0386 code is for "sensor B" but I would replace both of them. They are low in the front of the engine, one above the other.

For something like a crank sensor, I would always use AC/Delco parts. They are very critical, are known problems on that model year, and aren't that expensive. Rock Auto lists the upper crankshaft position sensor for $47 and the lower crankshaft position sensor for $50, AC/Delco parts, less for aftermarket. I would be leery of the aftermarket economy line parts if I wanted to keep the car trouble-free for a long time.

The problem with with the first "buy" of these parts by GM. You can tell if someone has some old parts from that buy by looking at where they were made. I forget the country of origin of the bad parts, but I would hope that all of them are out of the supply chain by now.

This is a simple DIY job. I would do it myself this time.

CTS-V_LateralGs_6-2018_tiny.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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Hey Jim

Good to see you on here, and a big Thank You for the response. I recall that it took my indy less than an hour to do the job. After I observed, I felt the job was well within my range of knowledge; just not sure about getting up and down these days, then paying the price of body pains for the next several days! And, I did suspect that the after-market parts could be part of the problem. I'll start searching NAPA and others for OEM only parts. As you suggested, price wasn't that much more, and perhaps I can avoid doing this job again in the future.

I did find it odd that having owned the 2000 DeVille since 2004, I never had the crank shaft sensors go bad. The problem then occured after the dealer installed the new engine. New engine was installed as a result of oil leak. Inserts didn't correct the problem, and the leak ws not considered a manufacture defect, as was 'suggested' by my after-mrket extended warranty. I had to bite the bullet for the new engine!

I mentioned the "extra" socket extenssions required to reach the parts. My indy did the job in my garage, didn't bring all his tools and I had to borrow additional extensions from my friendly neighbor last time.

Thanks again for the response.

Steve M.

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There are people here who have done this job that will chip in. I believe that these sensors can be reached either from above or below but I don't know which is preferred for a DIY job. Only someone who has done the job themselves can speak knowledgeably about the specifics for the tools to use.

CTS-V_LateralGs_6-2018_tiny.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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Hey Jim,

I just "may" try this install myself, (with one of my sons standing by)! My indy can't get to my home until the weekend and I don't want to take a chance of driving the car and have it stall on me while out somewhere. I've read that this could very well happen. Also, I'm very impatient - - - according to the Mrs. But, if it's broke, I want it fixed!

I plan to go to a local Harbor Freight Outlet later today and purchase some inexpensive extensions for my sockets. It's a long reach, (about 20 + inches) up to these parts from underneath the vehicle. If I recall I'll also need a 10 mm, 3/8 socket and swivel to do the job. Question: Do you know if it's necessary to disconnect the battery before I attempt the install myself? Probably not a bad idea any time electrical components are involved. The only inconvenience is that I may lose any pre-programmed settings, i.e. radio, seat positions, etc.

When my indy did this job in May 2012, he worked from under the car, so I don't think it's a job than can be accomplished from above.

Later,

Steve M.

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Always disconnect the ground at the battery before you do *any* work on the car. The battery is dangerous to you as well as the car. Shorting to your wedding ring could cause an arc that could cost you a finger. A watchband short can be even worse. Then, there's what happens to the car when something shorts out, even if it's a small enough short that you don't notice it.

The next time you can look into a dealer service area or any other shop that uses qualified mechanics, see if any of the techs are wearing watches or rings. If any of the guys that are in the process of doing hands-on work under the hood, under the dash, or under the car (pulling wheels doesn't count) are wearing watches or rings, go elsewhere.

I once was dumb enough to try to check a tired car battery that had been sitting on the garage floor for a year after I replaced it with a fresh battery - by shorting it with a wrench. It may have been tired and not charged for a year, but the arc threw a massive flash and explosion of smoke that turned out to be vaporized manganese steel from a huge notch in the side of the wrench. Always respect a car, motorcycle, ATV, lawn motor, security system, or any other lead-acid battery. They are capable of massive currents when shorted and are dangerous.

I do believe that the job *can* be done from above, based on what I remember from my 1997 Eldorado (gone since March). The 1997 FSM, which I still have, says to raise the vehicle, so clearly they expect the car to be on a lift. The process in the FSM is simple, remove the connector and retaining bolt for each sensor, pull them off, then put the new ones on, torque the retaining bolt to 89 in-lb (only 7.4 lb-ft) and put the connector back on. Then, lower the vehicle.

The only things that I would watch for would be to keep track of which sensor is the upper and which is the lower, and don't mix up the connectors, either. Also, inspect the O-ring oil seal on each sensor and get a new one if it doesn't look like new.

CTS-V_LateralGs_6-2018_tiny.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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Hey Listers,

My Indy replaced both Crankcase Position Sensors yesterday. Used OEM parts this time from Rock Auto as suggested by Texas Jim and new parts came with new "O" rings! Cost: approx. $90.00. I'm hoping the OEM parts last longer than the after-market parts lasted that my Indy installed back in May 2012!

Work needed to be done from underneath the car, took about an hour and the job went well. It's necessary to remove the dust cover under the engine before doing the repair. My Indy did have trouble getting the wires loose from the old sensors, and he emphazised that it's very difficult to reach the parts unless you have small hands!!!! Tools required a 10 MM socket and about 18 inches of 3/8 extensions plus a swivel attachment to the socket. I did need to take the car back to the local Auto Zone to have the Fault Code erased after the replacement sensors were installed; no charge for this service.

Hope this is of some help to Listers in the future.

Thanks so much for all the help and advice.

Steve M. in Maryland

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Jim,

Thanks for the info re. reading the codes myself vs. driving to Auto Zone. I'll Google that and see what I can learn. In addition to

the 2000, Deville I also own a 2007 DTS so every bit of knowledge will be helpful.

Regards,

Steve M. in Maryland

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Jim,

Thanks for the info re. reading the codes myself vs. driving to Auto Zone. I'll Google that and see what I can learn. In addition to

the 2000, Deville I also own a 2007 DTS so every bit of knowledge will be helpful.

Regards,

Steve M. in Maryland

Look on the main page of this site for direction on reading the codes yourself on the 2000.

You CAN NOT read the codes the same way on the 2007 DTS. For it, you will need a GOOD code reader that is CAN BUS compatible.

I have a 2006 DTS... if you have any questions about your 2007... I will try to help.

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  • 2 months later...

My 2000 Deville has been stalling and I'm getting the crak shaft position sensor code So I'm replacing it. I just ad motor mounts, CV joints and wheel bearings replaced, should have done the sensors then since we are going back in is there anything else in that area I should check out or go ahead and replace? thanks'

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My 2000 Deville has been stalling and I'm getting the crak shaft position sensor code So I'm replacing it. I just ad motor mounts, CV joints and wheel bearings replaced, should have done the sensors then since we are going back in is there anything else in that area I should check out or go ahead and replace? thanks'

Check the CONNECTIONS to the crankshaft position sensors... the mechanic may have knocked a wire loose.

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If you were getting the codes before the work on the motor mounts etc., I would replace the senors.

CTS-V_LateralGs_6-2018_tiny.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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