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deville p1350, p1377, p1370, p1371


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Can anyone please help me.....im at my wits end..... my car has been in shop for 3weeks awhile the p1370, p1371,codes first the shop said that it was my crankshaft and cam sensor and they changed them at that moment they told me to pick up my car i drove down the street car cut off codes were back but this time i had p1350, p1370, p1371 took it back they then said it was my ignition control module since they just put a new cam and crankshaft sensors in so they said its fixed drove i up te street same thing happened cut off light came back on with same three codes they said its not the parts their new your having a wiring problem they claim they got a loose g26 wire and fixed it but when i made it up the street car cut off and now i have the codes of p1377, p1350, p1370, p1371 does anyone know please wht they are not doing right or didnt do???????

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:welcomesmiley:

P1377 IC Cam Pulse To 4X Reference Pulse
P1350 Ignition Control System
P1370 IC 4X Reference Circuit Too Many Pulses
P1371 IC 4X Reference Circuit Too Few Pulses

For what it's worth, the 4X signal is on the fuel control circuit (this drives the fuel injectors to add fuel only during each cylinder's intake stroke) and is used by the ignition control (IC) module for checking to make sure that everything is going as planned. It's a signal between the PCM and the IC module.

The 1997 FSM troubleshooting chart for P1370 (pages 6-526 and 527) says to check for a plug wire improperly run next to the ignition module or wiring under the beauty cover, outside things like a two-way radio in the car or a radar across the street, a flaky battery charger on the car, etc. Except for the possibility of a mis-routed plug wire (which I would look at!), this isn't your problem. Then the FSM says to check the connections of the PPL/WHT wire in the harness between the ignition control module and the PCM and make sure that the connection is good on both ends. If that doesn't fix it, they say to change the ignition module. Never does this DTC write-up mention the cam or crank sensors.

The FSM write-up on P1371 is on the next page and the troubleshooting chart is very similar, except that it says that if P0322 (IC Module 4X Reference Circuit No Frequency) or P1320 (IC 4X Reference Circuit Intermittent) are set, fix that first and come back if that doesn't fix the problem.

Now we come to the FSM for the technician-installed DTCs. The write-up for P1350 is on pages 6-522 though 525. P1350 is thrown when no ignition pulses are received by the PCM when the engine is running - the crank and cam sensors stopped getting through to the PCM. Interestingly enough, the first thing in the troubleshooting guide is to run the codes and look for P0322, P0372, P1323, P1371, P1375 or P1376 and fix them first, but, then clear the codes (you can do this from the A/C buttons; see the link in my signature block for instructions) and see if everything is OK; if so, you're done.

For P1350, the FSM says to remove the connector for *all* the wires that go between the IC and PCM (BLK, BLU/BLK, PPL/WHT,TAN/BLK, WHT, and RED/BLK) and check *all* the terminals in both connectors and check *all* the wires with an Ohmmeter. If the problem persists when that's all good, change the IC module. If that doesn't do it, change the PCM. Nowhere does it mention crank or cam sensors.

For the Bonus DTC, P1377, pages 6-537 and 538 pretty much start out with a summary of the write-up for P1370, then say to check the ignition control module ground connections and the connections to the cam sensors. If that doesn't do it, change the cam sensor.

Now that we have the background on what *should* have been done, and to answer your question, the techs thought that they knew what the codes meant and didn't read the manual, and fixed the wrong thing, and did that wrong, and now you have some minor wiring problems on top of your original problem, which they have not yet touched.

At this point I would not take the car back where it was. I hope it wasn't a dealer; no Goodwrench training is reflected in what they did as you tell it. If you are at all inclined to fix it yourself, nothing is that hard or complicated. If you are mystified by wires and electricity, though, I would have it fixed or get a friend who is good with electricity to help you or do it for you.

First, look at the invoice (or call the people who worked on your car) and find out the manufacturer and part number of the cam and crank sensors that they put on your car. If the are not AC/Delco, get them from a dealer before you start the job. They aren't too expensive, AC/Delco parts are $35 each (you have two) for the crank sensors and $22 for the cam sensor from RockAuto.com; keep these numbers handy and negotiate if the dealer parts counter wants too much markup, or just order them from Rock Auto if you can wait a few days for shipment.

Secondly, make sure that all the connections to the cam and crank sensors are good. The terminals inside the connectors should not be pushed back, should be clean and tight, and the connectors should make a good, tight, weather-proof connection. If you need to replace questionable-quality crank and cam sensors, do it when you pull off the connector; it's quick and simple then. The crank sensors are sealed with an O-ring ($10 at Rock Auto) and if the old ones are not *perfect* then replace them.

Then, now that the technician-installed problems are done with, we can get to the problem that you are having. Check the harness connection between the IC and the PCM. If it's never been off, then you can go right to checking the grounds and clearing the codes. If there is any doubt, pull off the connector on both ends of that cable and make sure that the terminals are not pushed back, are clean and tight, and before you put it back on either module, use an Ohmmeter to check every wire to make sure that there are no broken wires in the harness somewhere. Especially the PPL/WHT wire, which carries the 4X signal that is not right. When you are sure that the connectors are good and well-placed on both modules and all the grounds are good, clear the codes and see if you are good. If not, replace the IC module.

If you are NOT ready for a DIY job, find someone who can do this for you. Look for the ASE certification, etc. Feel free to print out this post and take it to him. If he is intimidated by this post, go elsewhere.

CTS-V_LateralGs_6-2018_tiny.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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Hey, thank all of us when it's fixed!

CTS-V_LateralGs_6-2018_tiny.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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k so now i have codes P0405, P1404, P0507....?? car is getting hot cause my window is fogged up.

P0405 - Exhaust Gas recirculation position sensor - low voltage.

P0507 - Idle speed high...

This one may be caused by the code P0405... When P0405 is fixed, P0507 will probably go away on it's own.

P1404 is the EGR Pintle Position...

You may be able to take the EGR valve off and clean it real good and fix all the codes at one time, since they are all related to the EGR valve.

Worst case, the EGR valve will need replacing.

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405 EGR position sensor low voltage.

507 Idle speed high.

1404 EGR closed position performance.

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It sounds like the solved the big problem and now you are down to cleaning up the little things that have been there a long time.

CTS-V_LateralGs_6-2018_tiny.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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From what Texas Jim and Logan say, you need to have your EGR valve and EGR lines cleaned out and checked. If the EGR is bad, it will be replaced as part of that operation. Then you are done.

CTS-V_LateralGs_6-2018_tiny.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Not all EGR valves can be saved by cleaning. You may need to replace the EGR. But it's always worth a try.

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