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CV Joint boot replacement


cdndeville

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I have read just about everything here but never anyone ever replacing a CV joint boot. Is it because its a difficult job or because no one here has had a boot split on them.

Anyways the left outer boot has split on the (inside, towards trans.) with about 60% of the grease spewed out already. I think I must have driven it for about a week or 2 max before actually realizing this had happened. Do you think this has done damage to the joint that might show up in the future? I checked it right now its not making any noise on driving it with end-to-end steering turns.

I have looked at the FSM for this and it says to leave the knuckle bolts in place and just remove the balljoint and tie-rod end and to remove the hub main nut. They also suggest doing the work on car and not pulling the entire drive shaft out from the tranny end. There reason being that if not pulled correctly the inner joint will separate when it should not. Any suggestions? Has someone done this before?

Also the boot clamps require a special tool to clamp it down to 136 ft lbs. Is there a workaround to this tool? Would a pair of vise-grips and brute-force work equally well? Where do I find a tool like this to begin with? The boot itself with grease and clamps is cheap about CAD $25.

Thanks in advance for you help.

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As long as the joint is not clicking on sharp turns, you are probably OK just replacing the boot. If you are going to replace the boot, I would highly recommend buying the boot clamp crimping tool.

If it were my car, I would pull the half shaft and flush all of the old grease from the joint with solvent or a parts washer and then repack the CV joint with the new grease. Be sure to buy replacement boots that are a comparable durometer (hardness) as the OEM.

Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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I have replaced two of them. Actually, if the truth be known, My neighbor was a mechanic and I helped him. There is a special tool to crimp the band that hold it on. Fortunately he brought one home from work. I seem to recall once using a large hose clamp and never had a problem with it. I think when we did it (years ago) we removed everything right up to the trans. You also need a very large set of retaining ring pliers as I recall. Parts are cheap, labor is another story. It is a dirty, up to your elbows in grease job. If I never do another one it'll be too soon.

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I've done a few boots on other GM vehicles.

KHE and Ranger have given great advice.

I just wanted to clarify on the point about removing the axle from the transmission.

You mentioned about not pulling the axle due to a possible inner joint problem.

You cannot "pull" the axle from the transmission, or you will cause a problem with the inner joint.

You simply use a large pry bar and pry the axle out in the gap between the inner joint and the transmission case.

As KHE says, wash the old joint before installing the new boot/grease.

Grit and grime from the road will be mixed with the old grease and will rapidly wear out your joint.

I have never had any success at installing the clamps without the proper tool.

Barry

2008 STS V8
2016 Colorado Z71
1970 Corvette LT-1 Coupe

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Well I am able to rent the tool from our Canadian equivalent [CanadianTire] of AutoZone (or Idiot zone as some have referred to it). So that is good news I guess but these crimping pliers dont have a torque spec. on them. I would think that torquing something like this really isnt necessary... tight is tight. I agree that it is necessary to wash off the old grease before packing the joint with new grease.

Now the boot kit (boot, 2 clamps and grease) at any parts store other than a GM Dealer is about $25-30, while the dealer quotes about $85. With that price differential I am thinking there must be a huge difference in quality and am leaning towards the dealer because I really do NOT want to be doing the same job a year from now. What do you guys think is the dealership ripping me off? Do you think the aftermarket part can be that poor in quality?

Now the challenge is doing this in 0-5 C weather here in Toronto. The garage isnt big enough to park it inside, close the door and still have room to work. To avoid damage to the joint I have parked the car for the last week, so I really need to get this done soon. Hopefully this weekend lets see.

thanks for the great advice.

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Many of the aftermarket boots are very soft - too soft that they don't hold up for long. The OEM boots are a molded thermplastic material that holds up much longer.

$85 for a CV boot is pricey.....if the part store boot is the same type of material and hardness as the OEM, you should be OK using it.

Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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