Jump to content
CaddyInfo Cadillac Forum

spraying water mist into the intake


Recommended Posts

Has anyone ever heard of this? Seems having a spray bottle & manually spraying into the intake directly as the car is idling will break off the stubborn carbon bonding to the rings & cylinders. I also read it's recommended to bypass the cat to prevent it from clogging - although that's not an easy feat.

I have seen first hand that this water/antifreeze leaking into a cylinder does remove the carbon. although I wouldn't want to try this on an aluminum engine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Yes, I've heard of it. In fact, I've actually done it myself about 30 years ago. There were no CC's at the time, so it was a no brainer (and I mean that in a good way) Today, it would be a no-brainer in the wrong way, especially on a Northstar. Don't do it! (There were no oxygen sensors back then either)

Years ago the subject was an old cast iron, low compression Chevy small block, and even though the engine was unharmed, I never could tell if there was any difference in performance. Back then we'd just fill an old beer can with cold water and slowly pour it into the carb while keeping the engine revved up by working the throttle linkage at the same time. It helped to have several empty beer cans ready before you tried it. You know the thought process, "it seemed like a good idea at the time".

Never underestimate the amount of a persons greed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

sucking in or misting in seafoam is proven and no dangers using it. So I know water is cheaper but I would just use seafoam.

* 1966 Deville Convertible

* 2007 Escalade ESV Black on Black

* 1996 Fleetwood Brougham Black on Black V4P -Gone
* 1983 Coupe Deville Street/Show Lowrider -Gone

* 1970 Calais 4dr Hardtop GONE
* 2000 Deville DTS - Silver with Black Leather and SE grille GONE
* 1999 Seville STS - Pearl Red GONE

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I've heard of it. In fact, I've actually done it myself about 30 years ago. There were no CC's at the time, so it was a no brainer (and I mean that in a good way) Today, it would be a no-brainer in the wrong way, especially on a Northstar. Don't do it! (There were no oxygen sensors back then either)

Years ago the subject was an old cast iron, low compression Chevy small block, and even though the engine was unharmed, I never could tell if there was any difference in performance. Back then we'd just fill an old beer can with cold water and slowly pour it into the carb while keeping the engine revved up by working the throttle linkage at the same time. It helped to have several empty beer cans ready before you tried it. You know the thought process, "it seemed like a good idea at the time".

I could have written this post almost word for word.

The dangerous part of doing it on the Northstar (or any engine with a TB like it) is that the water can settle in the manifold before it gets ingested. Unlike the old carbureted engine or even a 4.9, the mist has to go into the manifold horizontally and make many turns. If can settle out and pool. Give it enough throttle and it slugs in a load and hydro-locks. Party over.

That danger still exists with Seafoam as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have you ever noticed the difference in engine performance/response when driving in "high" humidity conditions such as when driving through rain? WOT therapy in the rain could be very beneficial.

But I would never (not ever) spray water directly into the throttle body of a Northstar or any other port injected engine. Never!

If I thought the cooling effect/air density properties would be a benefit, I "might" try holding the engine speed at or above 1,500 RPM while "misting" water across the throttle body opening. But certainly not directly in the throttle body opening.

Jim

Drive your car.

Use your cell phone.

CHOOSE ONE !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

sucking in or misting in seafoam is proven and no dangers using it. So I know water is cheaper but I would just use seafoam.

We had a member use Seafoam and cause major problems.

http://caddyinfo.ipb...h=1entry78631

We had a tech named IAN send us a photo of damage caused by a GM tech that sprayed carb cleaner in the TB, it pooled, and when he revved the engine, the pooled solvent got sucked into a cylinder and caused THIS hydrolock (personally, WOTs and Techron are my choice):

Hydrolock_UEC_into_intake_with_pool.jpg

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

1996 and newer - DTC codes OBD2 >> https://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/gm/obd_codes.htm

How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

Cadillac History & Specifications Year by Year  http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/index.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ouch that is one big hole.

Anything other than clean air in the intake is a big no no. if you ever remove the intake it should explain alot

GM FAN FOREVER

Nice, clean, luxury= fine automobile

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...