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Replacing rear brake lines.


PAUL T

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I am about to tackle the rear brake line that goes from across the rear suspension on my 97 Deville. The connections are located above the frame on each side. There is very little room to work from the bottom. For anyone who has done this, can you get to the connections easier with the tires off and through the fender wells? From the bottom it looks like you need a fairly long tube wrench to get to the connection and very little room to turn them. Getting a hand up to them looks almost impossible. I am hoping that through the fender well works better. Anybody done this?

Edited by PAUL T
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Hi Paul!

I replaced all the brakelines from the abs unit and all the way back on my STS 1995 this summer and i must say that it wasnt easy regarding the very little space you have to work around! When i replaced the line that goes along the rear axle i began with loosen the clip on the right side with a long screwdriver and a hammer...finally it came off! Then i pulled it in from the bracket so it was loose, on the left side you have to also with a hammer and a long screwdriver undo the clip located at the other end of the line...then the line are loose from its mounts!

After that you need to undo the mountingbracket located on the top of the left wheelhouse, next to the shockabsorber.

Loosen the rubber hose that is connected to the line that goes along the rear axle and you can remove the entire brakeline in one piece.

Its very tight to get access to the clips but it can be done..

It took me and my father 2 days outside to replace all brakelines from the abs unit out to the wheels accept right front wheel.

Roger Martinsen

Sweden

Roger Martinsen

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I replaced the lines from the master cylinder back to the rear drivers tire.

Now I have to do from that tire across the car to the other tire.

This post is very useful to me, thank you, Roger.

WARNING: I'm a total car newbie, don't be surprised if I ask a stupid question! Just trying to learn.

Cheers!

5% discount code at RockAuto.com - click here for your discount!

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You are welcome Lothos!

It seems like its impossible at first but it can be done..

Inspect espacially the rubber hose that connects the rear line to the mounting bracket in the left rear wheel house, mine i had to replace, not with a GM home but a VW hose!

There werent any GM dealer at the location where i worked on the car,only a VW dealer that had a similar hose with the right threads!

Roger Martinsen

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Well thanks for all the responses guys. I took the wheel off and checked it out, took the upper bracket off then back on and put the tire back on, then called my mechanic. I soaked everything with penetrating oil while I was in there. There was another short line that attached to the upper bracket that will probably need replaced also. The only question I have is if you remove the retainer clip on top of the frame, does this allow the line going across the rear suspension drop down enough to get to the connection? If it does then I may tackle it again tomorrow. Getting the retainer clip off doesn't look bad but getting it back on maybe fun. My 250 pound frame does not allow me to crawl under as easily as I did when I weighed 185. <_<:P

Edited by PAUL T
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I need to do the same line between the rear wheels, I need to do it before it gets cold. Not that I can drive the car too far because of the head gasket but I need to get this done. I dont want to create additional problems with moisture rusting the other tubing.

I have been putting this job off, and I am not looking forward to it

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

1996 and newer - DTC codes OBD2 >> https://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/gm/obd_codes.htm

How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

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I need to do the same line between the rear wheels, I need to do it before it gets cold. Not that I can drive the car too far because of the head gasket but I need to get this done. I dont want to create additional problems with moisture rusting the other tubing.

I have been putting this job off, and I am not looking forward to it

I understand not looking forward to it. With the rear wheel off you can see the line connection and can get to the upper bracket mounted to the inner fender, but you can not get your hands in there. The retainer will come off fairly easy with a long screw driver and hammer from underneath as Roger suggested. Getting it back on maybe tricky though. I might be able to remove the rubber line from the upper bracket then if the clip allows the lines to come free of the mount, the whole line might come out so you can get to the connections. I might go back out since the weather's good and try it again this afternoon. I will let you know how it goes.

Edited by PAUL T
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Thanks

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

1996 and newer - DTC codes OBD2 >> https://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/gm/obd_codes.htm

How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

Cadillac History & Specifications Year by Year  http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/index.htm

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If you loosen the rubberhose at the mounting bracket in the wheelhouse and then loosen the line from its plastic clips on the axle, u can disconnect the whole line with the rubberhose attached to the line..getting the clip back on with the new hose are a bit tricky..

Roger Martinsen

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I have not gotten in there yet, but I was thinking of cutting the tubing at the the HEX nut and then using a socket to get a good grip, is that possible? An in-line wrench is nice but a six point socket is better. What to you guys think?, possible?

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

1996 and newer - DTC codes OBD2 >> https://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/gm/obd_codes.htm

How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

Cadillac History & Specifications Year by Year  http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/index.htm

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O.K. I have been defeated. Even if you take the retaining clip off you still can not get the line out of the mounting tab until you unbolt the metal line from the rubber line. The picture in my shop manual shows a left and right proportioning valve for the lines coming back from the front of the car. Those connections would be the easiest to remove. That would let you pull the upper bracket in the fender well out far enough to remove those connections that would clear up a space to get to the mounting tab of the line that goes across the rear. My problem is that there is only a left proportioning valve that will let you free up one line but there is not a valve on the right line and it connects directly to the fender well mounting bracket. This does not allow the mounting bracket to move out away from the frame and body to get to those connections. That is hindering me from getting to the connection of the line I need to replace. If I had a hoist to put the car on and was able to work from underneath the car I might be able to get better access to the line needing to be changed. BBF you might be able to get a socket on the connection in question if the ratchet had a swivel head. You will definatly need long line wrenches. Roger I commend you for being able to fix the line yourself, but I am not able to crawl under the car as easy as I used to in my younger days.

All the brake lines in the rear of the car are needing changed. My mechanic will not be in until Monday so I will just have to wait. It will probably cost me double what it cost to replace the fuel pump. Thanks for the info.

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Im sorry to hear that Paul! But you must do it from underneath the car as i explained, my father who is 67 years old could not get his fingers up there either but my fingers are still thin.. i am 32 years old!

Look on the bright side, if you change thi lines now you probably never will have to do it again!

Roger

Roger Martinsen

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Oh boy, I am not looking forward to this, this is the reason I have delayed doing this job....

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

1996 and newer - DTC codes OBD2 >> https://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/gm/obd_codes.htm

How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

Cadillac History & Specifications Year by Year  http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/index.htm

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The pain in the a.. are where the line are connected to the rubber hose at the rear left on top of the axle. But if you cut the old line as much as possible and loosen the clip at the mounting bracket on top of the axle, then you can get it out.

Then with the new line, first pull it through the "ear" on top of the axle and draw it out in the left wheel house and screw the rubber hose back on,then pull it back again in to the "ear" and fasten it with the clip,then go on from there!

Like i said, its almost hopeless but it can be done!!

Roger

Roger Martinsen

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This may sound totally wacked, but how hard is it to drop the rear suspension from the body?, anyone thought about it?

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

1996 and newer - DTC codes OBD2 >> https://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/gm/obd_codes.htm

How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

Cadillac History & Specifications Year by Year  http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/index.htm

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I considered dropping the axle, but time was against me. Getting the lines out was not my concern. I knew getting my hands back in there to tighten them up was going to be the real problem and I did not want to get to that point and not get it back together. I was really humbled because I have never not been able to change a brake line, but there comes a time when you have to walk away and so I did. Good luck BBF.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Update, I got the my 97 Deville back from the mechanic today with the rear brake lines fixed. Cost was $80 which is $10 more than changing the fuel pump, I was expecting more. This was for the line across the rear axle and the small line on the drivers side to the rubber line. For comparison, changing the fuel pump in the tank was cheaper or easier than changing the rear brake lines. Who would have known.

Edited by PAUL T
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Update, I got the my 97 Deville back from the mechanic today with the rear brake lines fixed. Cost was $80 which is $10 more than changing the fuel pump, I was expecting more. This was for the line across the rear axle and the small line on the drivers side to the rubber line. For comparison, changing the fuel pump in the tank was cheaper or easier than changing the rear brake lines. Who would have known.

Have the mechanic inspected the rest of brake lines?

The saddest thing in life is wasted talent

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Have the mechanic inspected the rest of brake lines?

No, I inspected them, the rest were still good. The rear ones get all the road crud and winter salt thrown at them so that takes a toll on 12 year old lines. Like I said earlier, I usually do my own lines but these did me in.

Edited by PAUL T
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Update, I got the my 97 Deville back from the mechanic today with the rear brake lines fixed. Cost was $80 which is $10 more than changing the fuel pump, I was expecting more. This was for the line across the rear axle and the small line on the drivers side to the rubber line. For comparison, changing the fuel pump in the tank was cheaper or easier than changing the rear brake lines. Who would have known.

That sounds like a bargain given the difficulty of this job. This was just the labor correct?

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

1996 and newer - DTC codes OBD2 >> https://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/gm/obd_codes.htm

How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

Cadillac History & Specifications Year by Year  http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/index.htm

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Update, I got the my 97 Deville back from the mechanic today with the rear brake lines fixed. Cost was $80 which is $10 more than changing the fuel pump, I was expecting more. This was for the line across the rear axle and the small line on the drivers side to the rubber line. For comparison, changing the fuel pump in the tank was cheaper or easier than changing the rear brake lines. Who would have known.

That sounds like a bargain given the difficulty of this job. This was just the labor correct?

Yes, it was just labor. They only charge $35 per hour, so I assume it took a little over 2 hours with a lift and the right tools. I pay him cash too so they give me a better break.

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Whatta deal that was! Glad you got it fixed, did you ask the mechanic about the job, difficulty, tips, etc?

Pre-1995 - DTC codes OBD1  >>

1996 and newer - DTC codes OBD2 >> https://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/gm/obd_codes.htm

How to check for codes Caddyinfo How To Technical Archive >> http://www.caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-how-to-faq/

Cadillac History & Specifications Year by Year  http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/index.htm

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Update, I got the my 97 Deville back from the mechanic today with the rear brake lines fixed. Cost was $80 which is $10 more than changing the fuel pump, I was expecting more. This was for the line across the rear axle and the small line on the drivers side to the rubber line. For comparison, changing the fuel pump in the tank was cheaper or easier than changing the rear brake lines. Who would have known.

That sounds like a bargain given the difficulty of this job. This was just the labor correct?

Yes, it was just labor. They only charge $35 per hour, so I assume it took a little over 2 hours with a lift and the right tools. I pay him cash too so they give me a better break.

That's a good deal. The tubing is not expensive though. Watch the level of DOT3 in the master cylinder reservoir for a while. Some fittings may need retightening.

The saddest thing in life is wasted talent

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