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Frustration turns to panic


caddypete

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The other day I decided I would pull my plugs and see what they looked like. I thought maybe I could track down my random misfire and plugs are usually the best indicator. I go to the first plug on the front bank with a 3/8 drive socket and it won't break lose, I usaully use 3/8 drive on these projects less chance of doing any damage. I go get a 1/2 drive rachet and socket and it seems to break lose easiely. After several turns I start to wonder why is this plug not out yet? I pull the socket out to check and the extension comes put the socket stays, I try to get the socket off but no luck. I start to think I stripped the plug because tightning it did nothing. Now I'm panic stricken, there is no way to even put the coil pack on with that socket in there. I tried needle nose vice grips but the plug well is so tight I can't get a good grip, tried other extensions with a better clip ball on them, nothing. put a butterfly impact on it hopeing I could get enough speed to get the socket lose with a few quick turns no luck. I disconnect the battery and get the wire feed welder figuring I would weld an extension to the socket and get it out, after dragging it out I realize the socket sits to deep to get a good weld on it. I'm very aggravated and flustrated by now. I go get a large blade screwdriver that will go in the socket corner to corner and turn it to the flats of the socket where it gets wedged and give it a yank, nothing. I try it a few more times and wiggle it side to side. Finally the socket comes out, I'M half relieved by now. Now to deal with a stripped plug or a stripped head. I get the 3/8 drive socket and the plug is tight as can be, now I'm bewildered. I pick up the 1/2 drive socket and look at it and discover the outside bottom edge is scraped clean, yhen I realize the socket wasn't even on the plug, the socket was to thick and wider than the plug well walls and was stuck. I was relieved and irratated because I just spent 2 hours for nothing and had all sorts of tools out in the driveway because I didn't feel like moving the motorcycle to pull in the garage for a 1/2 hr job. Well that was my day how was yours?

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lol; this is how some of my mechanic adventures go also. Other times things go well. It is better to remember the other times and sign this off to an inexpensive lesson on socket usage.

Bruce

2016 Cadillac ATS-V gray/black

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"the socket was to thick and wider than the plug well walls and was stuck"

Wow! I believe I have a specially designed spark plug socket with inserted plastic part, which is supposed to hold an unscrewed plug firmly and help to pull it out of the block. You probably used just a standard socket. Is Northstar plug well diameter smaller than the diameter of a spark plug socket?

I am impressed with your determination to pull out a stuck socket by welding it to an extension! I would try an epoxy first. :)

The saddest thing in life is wasted talent

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One of my favorite "mechanic adventures" involved a 90 Cavalier, my first car. I put brakes on it front and rear. A job that I had never done before. I started on the rear drums first. After happily disassembling the brake lining I discovered that I didnt pay as close attention as I should have when taking them apart and couldnt get it back together again. After several hours of foul language and thrown tools, I bit the bullet and called my dad for advice. I was dumbfounded by the advice he gave me. He told me, "son, just remove the other wheel and use it as a reference!" I felt really foolish, because in my frustration, I hadnt thought of doing that. To make a long story short, it took me nearly all day to do the job. But I learned a valuable lesson!

2001 Deville, Sterling Silver exterior with Dark Gray leather, 93k miles

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One of my favorite "mechanic adventures" involved a 90 Cavalier, my first car. I put brakes on it front and rear. A job that I had never done before. I started on the rear drums first. After happily disassembling the brake lining I discovered that I didnt pay as close attention as I should have when taking them apart and couldnt get it back together again. After several hours of foul language and thrown tools, I bit the bullet and called my dad for advice. I was dumbfounded by the advice he gave me. He told me, "son, just remove the other wheel and use it as a reference!" I felt really foolish, because in my frustration, I hadnt thought of doing that. To make a long story short, it took me nearly all day to do the job. But I learned a valuable lesson!

That's the way we all learn. Unfortunately, you cannot apply your dad's advice to the steering wheel. :)

The saddest thing in life is wasted talent

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OK, Here's one of mine,

My buddy and I were both about 17 and replacing the rear differential gear cluster in his '65 GTO dark blue convertable with white interior. A * FINE * car it was.

Apparently a few too many hard starts and "speed shifting" between gears had taken their toll.

Well, we confidently removed the axles and then the gear cluster from his car and later on, from a junked GTO.

With even more confidence, we installed the good gear cluster in his GTO, used shim stock, plastigauge. Yep, we done did the whole mechanic bit just like the Pros...this stuff ain't so hard...

We fired it up and THUNK! It would NOT MOVE!! We dang near went through the clutch pack and a six pack.

After a lot of WTF, during a brief moment of clarity - we finally counted the teeth from the old gear cluster main ring and the new one...

You may have already guessed that we "assumend" the gear clusters were the same, DUH...not so lucky.

We went back the junk yard and took quite a while to get the pinion gear and even more time to install it.

Our young egos were severly bruised, but more importantly the GTO ran again...

Later

Add power to leave problems behind. Most braking is just - poor planning.
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