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Gasoline pump


adallak

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Here is a link on the subject:

http://auto.howstuffworks.com/question25.htm

I filled up the tank twice since the gas tank was replaced. In both cases the nozzle did not flip off automatically and the tank was overfilled... Coinsidence, or it has somethinf to do with tank replacement? Thanks.

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it really shouldn't be affected by your tank as all it does it shut off when the air return pulls in fuel. Was this the same station and nozzle? If not I would just try getting the nozzle at a differant angle and see what happens. As I say it shouldn't be affected but your tank.

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I agree with E, I used to have a 65 Scout and at one station had to do frikin aerobics to get gas in but had no problem at other stations

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Thanks for the replies. It did not happen at the same station, and that made me suspicious. But after reading the link I have provided I came to conclusion it was just a weired coincidence.

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If the angle or routing of the fuel filler tube to the tank changed during the swap that could effect this I suppose.

Bruce

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If the angle or routing of the fuel filler tube to the tank changed during the swap that could effect this I suppose.

Bruce, neither angle nor routing could be altered. Let's wait till I get the third fill up. :lol:

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ONCE is aberrant . . . . .

TWICE is not a coincidence.

Until you know better, don't fuel without a fire extinguisher at hand and don't overfill. Just one person's opinion.

Been there . . . .

Regards,

Warren

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Speaking of which, the other day some guy was filling his chevy and went to do something. The nozzle didn't shut off and started pumping gas EVERYWHERE. It probably dumped 10 gallons on the ground before I saw him come running out. And that is why you stay by the pump when your filling.

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Interesting. But the air tube is actually a vapor recovery tube. Before it's inception gas stations were losing gas when the temps were above 78 degrees. Gas vaporises at that point. The tube sucks the vapors back into the tank which then turn back to liquid gas. Not sure who actually "lost" the gas but that tube is designed as a vapor recovery system.

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Interesting. But the air tube is actually a vapor recovery tube. Before it's inception gas stations were losing gas when the temps were above 78 degrees. Gas vaporises at that point. The tube sucks the vapors back into the tank which then turn back to liquid gas. Not sure who actually "lost" the gas but that tube is designed as a vapor recovery system.

This is not exactly true. In some locales, vapor recovery is mandantory, and yes the vapors that normally would have been dispersed into the atmosphere to create smog and such, are collected and returned to the loading terminal. This system is totally seperate from the automatic shut off, which continues to operate as described in "How Stuff Works".

The answer to the other part of your question, about who loses the gasoline, is the station of course. And unless they have a special condesing unit on top of the canopy or building, they still only recover a small portion of the vapors due to normal condesation. The simpler and most generally prevelant system nationwide only requires that the tanker truck delivering a load of gasoline, collect the vapors and return them to the terminal. At that point, special equipment is USAULLY installed (it depends on sales volumes sometimes) which costs a great deal of money to install and maintain (thanks EPA). There the vapors are collected into beds of activated charcoal, and recondensed into gasoline under vacuum. So the terminal is usually the place that "gains" the product. And under ideal circumstances, as much as 10% of the loaded liquid volume can be recovered from the rich vapors.

On a side note, gasoline vaporizes at ALL temperatures above about -225°F, but vaporization occurs more readily as temperature rises.

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On a side note, gasoline vaporizes at ALL temperatures above about -225°F, but vaporization occurs more readily as temperature rises.

Gasoline is pretty much the definition of a Volatile Organic Compound! :blink:

Jason(2001 STS, White Diamond)

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