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Sirius and XM want to marry


JimD

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You could have the ability to cherry pick programming from a combined company by the end of 2007 if the FCC and the DoJ will get out of the way.

Jim

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You could have the ability to cherry pick programming from a combined company by the end of 2007 if the FCC and the DoJ will get out of the way.

And you could have the opportunity to pay whatever fee they want, since there would no longer be any competition.

As far as cherry picking what programs you want, it doesn't work that way on satellite TV, so why do you think it would work that way on satellite radio? Doesn't work that way on Sirius right now.

I hope they shoot it down, as it is an idea that doesn't have the consumer's best interests in mind, just an idea to eliminate all competition.

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[attachmentid=3091]

There is no attempt to eliminate the competition in the form of terrestial AM and FM broadcast; or IPods, or fill in the blank.

Perhaps a single company can stay in business instead have having both of them fail?

It matters not to me what the satellite TV vendors offer; included above is the announcement with a paragraph that addresses "Greater Programming and Content Choices".

Jim

Drive your car.

Use your cell phone.

CHOOSE ONE !

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I listen to XM radio almost exclusively, but I will be glad if Sirius and XM merge, as there are some selections that are only on Sirius.

Bruce

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I listen to XM radio almost exclusively, but I will be glad if Sirius and XM merge, as there are some selections that are only on Sirius.

I've had Sirius for quite some time now - long before Howard Stern and won't be without it.

I chose Sirius "as there are some selections that are only on Sirius." I don't care if they merge as long as the "new" company doesn't screw with my tunes. :angry:

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Together they will survice, separate they will not, for the rest of us, who don't like to pay for radio, HD radio sounds like it will be pretty good...even if its full of commercials :P

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Well,

We bought a lifetime membership to Sirius some years ago for $500 and no monthly fees ever, which also included unlimited website playing. Neither of which were available on XM at the time (or perhaps even now). I would hope that ageement stands, or there will be yet another class action suit..

It does seem odd that the FCC or whomever, did not demand that the sat receivers be compatible way back then. As sorta noted in a recent article "... the technology migration path will be difficult". Its a bit like Beta vs VHS and consumers get screwed again - because nobody took a stand.

Maybe I'll just take up the accordian again... :huh:

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I don't understand how this will work if it goes though. XM and Sirius radios are not compatible with one another, so unless they continue to stream to both types of radios some people are going to have radios that will no longer work! This would really suck for the people like me who have the factory XM radio! I DO NOT want some add on radio stuck to my dash connected via a crappy FM modulator! I don't see how they will make this work... :blink:

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I hope the merger is either denied or the shareholders vote it down.

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  • 1 year later...

OK, it will be more like the end of 2008 and the road block was the FCC and not the Department of Justice.

Government bureaucrats managed to delay the inevitable merger for a year. At what cost to share holders of both companies?

Let the government-approved cherry picking progress! Key words are "consumers" and "more choices".

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

FCC Approves Merger of XM-Sirius Satellite Radio Firms - washingtonpost.com

By Kim Hart

Washington Post Staff Writer

Friday, July 25, 2008; 8:56 PM

XM Satellite Radio won final approval to merge with Sirius Satellite Radio after

the deciding vote in the Federal Communications Commission was cast tonight,

putting an end to a contentious and drawn-out bid to join the companies.

The decision was delayed Friday by a last-minute stalemate between two

Republican commissioners. Commissioner Deborah Taylor Tate refused to cast her

tie-breaking vote to approve the merger until FCC Chairman Kevin J. Martin cast

his own deciding vote to penalize the companies for violating some technical

rules. The hold-up was resolved when Tate formally voted in favor of the deal.

The deal was largely sealed Thursday when the FCC fined the nation's two major

satellite radio companies $20 million for breaking federal rules. The

enforcement of the technical offenses was a sticking point for Tate, the last of

the five-member commission to cast her vote on the deal.

The FCC's approval means XM and Sirius have passed the final regulatory hurdle

associated with the $13 billion merger, which was proposed almost a year and a

half ago. It also means satellite radio consumers will have access to both

companies' programming and, eventually, more choices in terms of channel

packages.

The merger has been heavily critized by the broadcasting industry, consumer

groups and dozens of lawmakers and state attorneys general who argue the merger

would create a monopoly satellite radio provider that could lead to higher

prices and fewer programming options. But the deal passed antitrust scrutiny by

the Justice Department in March and has been under the FCC's review for more

than 16 months.

Under conditions imposed by the FCC, the companies have promised to let

consumers pick only the channels they want and pay less for certain packages of

channels. Radios that allow a-la-carte channel selections will also eventually

be available for car dashboards -- the largest area of growth for the companies.

Jim

Drive your car.

Use your cell phone.

CHOOSE ONE !

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