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Blower Motor


Vince P

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1994 Seville

Blower Motor

Two Questions

My blower motor died. It was probably due to the fact that two spark plug wires were touching the casing.

I got a replacement motor from a salvage yard. Do not know what year or model it came from. I gave, the salvage yard, a list of all the cars that used the same blower motor.

I have a 30 day guarantee. So far the blower motor has been running about 20 hours. No problems.

Question 1

The replacement blower motor did not have the 2 lb steel plate on the rear. With this exception the motors, old and replacement, look exactly alike. The part number label is on the side of the replacement rather than on the steel back.

IS THIS STEEL PLATE NECESSARY? WHAT DOES IT DO? SHOULD I TAKE TO STEEL BACK PLATE FROM THE OLD AND PUT IT ON THE REPLACEMENT?

Question 2

The newest replacement version of the blower motor has what looks like an aluminum cover that is insulated on the inside. I am guessing is that this cover is grounded, protecting the blower motor from electro-magnetic radiation from sparkplug wires.

WOULD IT BE WORTH WHILE TO MAKE A GROUNDED METAL COVER TO PROTECT THE BLOWER MOTOR?

Vince P

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Regarding transplanting the steel plate, I would look at the instructions that come in the box with the new motor. If there is any change from what the FSM says, it will be there.

My 1997 FSM, page 1B-35, says to remove an "inertial plate" from the blower motor before removing it from the car, and to keep it for the new blower motor. I suspect that this is the large metal plate that you are referring to.

The manual says several times that the blower motor is very sensitive to balance, and that handling of the blower motor should be minimized. In the instructions for changing the blower motor, they say "Important -- leave blower motor in box to reduce the amount of handling of the blower motor." They seem to say to put the inertial plate on the blower motor after you bolt it in. There is no diagram.

I would venture that the inertial plate keeps the motor quieter and more stable in operation. I would definitely use it. Apparently you can put it on without removing the replacement blower motor.

The addition of a shielding cover in the latest design is good news, should any of us get a new one. Rather than making one for a blower motor that doesn't have one, I would think that your effort would be better spent on adding restraints to the ignition wiring to keep it off the existing blower motor. This will be simple and easier, and it will have the same effect of protecting the blower motor from the ignition wiring. And, making a new shielding cover for the motor is going to involve lots of handling of the blower motor, which probably isn't a good idea.

CTS-V_LateralGs_6-2018_tiny.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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It is possible you got one of the newer style motors which do not have the inertia plate and they did not include the fiberglass/foil cover. The original motors with the inertial plates had longer bolts to accomodate the inertial plate and would be very loose if assembled without the inertial plate.

The fiberglass and foil shield that comes with a new blower motor acts like a heat shield as well as an EMI shield.

Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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One sure way to tell which motor you have is by the mounting bolts. The factory blower (with the inertial plate) had 5 mounting bolts. The redesigned one (with the aluminum sheild) uses only 3.

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Thank you for all the information. I am impressed.

1. The, junk, yard replacement blower does not have 3 mounting bolts. It has five. It looks exactly like the original with the exception of the inertial plate.

2. The three rear bolts (that go through the inertial place) on the old unit are 5/16” too long at the point that they bottom without the inertial plate.

3. KDE – Kevin, are you saying that there was a later version of the blower motor with shorter bolts, which looked exactly like the original version, less inertial plate???

4. The only part of the blower brushless motor that can wear is the center shaft. ANY THOUGHTS ABOUT PUTTING A LITTLE GREASE ON THE SHAFT BEFORE ESSEMBLY?

Thanks Again

Vince P

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1. The, junk, yard replacement blower does not have 3 mounting bolts. It has five. It looks exactly like the original with the exception of the inertial plate.

Maybe the inertial plate is missing?

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The 1997 FSM says to use the old Inertial Plate when changing the blower motor.

CTS-V_LateralGs_6-2018_tiny.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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It's possible that someone removed the inertial plate but they'd need to use different bolts as the bolts that retain the inertial plate would need to be longer. The purpose of the inertial plate is to reduce vibrations in the motor. When the service manuals were written, the new style blower wasn't out yet so the inertial plate was transfered to the replacement blower. Be careful in applying grease - apply it sparingly as it can attract all sorts of dirt.

The service replacement blower mounts with three screws, has a foil & fiberglass heat shield and does not use an inertial plate.

Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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I wouldn't touch the blower motor more than absolutely necessary, as per the warnings in the FSM. Most bearings are permanently lubricated in newer parts, partciularly premium long-life parts like Cadillac HVAC blower motors, and adding lubricant can't help.

CTS-V_LateralGs_6-2018_tiny.jpg
-- Click Here for CaddyInfo page on "How To" Read Your OBD Codes
-- Click Here for my personal page to download my OBD code list as an Excel file, plus other Cadillac data
-- See my CaddyInfo car blogs: 2011 CTS-V, 1997 ETC
Yes, I was Jims_97_ETC before I changed cars.

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