Jan Olsson

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Jan Olsson last won the day on September 7

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About Jan Olsson

  • Rank
    CaddyInfo Fan
  • Birthday 02/06/1974

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Sweden
  • Interests
    Cars, engineering and economics

Previous Fields

  • Car Model and Year
    2012 CTS-V (wife has my 2002 STS)
  • Engine
    Supercharged 6.2L (LSA)

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  1. Hi all! I thought I would do a write up on what "problems" I have encountered over the years so far. Being that I drive about 25 k miles a year I have to do regular services more frequently of course, I also encounter problems more frequently than the average car owner will do. Bear in mind that I have owned Cadillacs and relied upon them as daily drivers since 2002 and am quite familiar with them and always do what work needs to be done by myself except from lately. This is because I have access to a very small garage and my rule of thumb is “if I can’t close the garage door after me when I am done wrenching for today, then I leave it to a trusted shop instead”. I also have limited possibilities to raise my car because of the tight space. My previous Cadillacs in order were: 1988 Eldorado (about 150 k miles on it when sold after 50k miles of my usage) 1993 STS (about 150k miles on it when sold after about 50k miles of my usage) 2002 STS (about 200k miles on it when sold after about 180k miles of my usage) Current daily driver 2012 CTS-V (almost 81 k miles on it and 53 k miles of my usage) Trying to rank them in regards of dependability is hard. Propably the Eldo was the best. But I guess it is comparing apples to oranges because of how different I drove that car compared to the others. I never did anything above the ordinary to the Eldo more than regular service but on the other side that car was not exactly a car seeing very high speeds and aggressive driving very often. I drove it fast, just not STS or CTS-V fast J Just a very nice car that by the way still is running with 165k miles on it. Of course there were small things that needed to be repaired, sticking e-brakes, leaking valve cover gaskets etc, but just minor stuff. Second best? I would say my 2002 STS. I drove that car HARD and the only regular thing I had to do was to change the front wheel hubs every 50k miles because they wore out. I also replaced catalytic converter, servo steering pump, crankshaft position sensors, rear brake calipers and the infamous intermediate shaft. Except from that just small things like fixing the driver side door lock. When I sold it it had the half case oil leak but it still ran like a champ. I recall that I have made several pages of notes on what I had done with it (the records followed the car when I sold it) but it was services and repairs for 180 k miles so I expect that list to be quite tall! After that I would say the 1993 STS. I bought it with burned exhaust valves on the no 1 cylinder and fixed that. The dampers for the RSS (road sensing suspension) needed replacement, EGR-valve, alternator and mufflers was replaced but besides that it was great. The “worst” car of them all is my 2012 CTS-V. Understand me right. This is a great car, probably the best of them all especially considered the usage it sees (seeing a lot of WOTs, hard cornering and hard braking) but this one I really want everything to work perfectly on and therefore it equals more fixing. There were things with the other cars that I never bothered to fix. The AC on the Eldo that was out of service when I bought it, the seat heaters on my 1993 STS and interior leather on the passenger seat, the half case oil leak on my 2002 STS for example. Simply because these faults at the time seemed expensive to repair compared to the relative use I would have from the repairs. Now I got a thicker wallet and thus can be more picky about what I accept and not. This list of what is done to the car is from my memory, I’ll have to double check with my notes later on to see if I have missed something. I bought the car with about 28 k miles on it and now it has done almost 81 k miles. Oil and filter changes when the OLM tells me to (with recommended weight and type of oil) goes without saying A new set of tires now and then, Studded winter tires lasts two seasons. Summer tires lasts one. (It is just as I expected. High speed rated tires wear faster than regular tires and my driving style doesn’t exactly prolong life expectancy J Front brake pads lasts a year, rear about two. Front pads wear uneven at winter time because of the amount of dirt from the road quickly gathers on the brake caliper and inhibits brake action on the outer pads. I thought about using less expensive brake pads at winter time but am reluctant to use them because I am afraid they will crack the rotors more easily. Exhange of coolant and rear axle fluid Front discs, a set a year (blame my driving habits, because I do J) And now a list of repairs/services out of the ordinary: Supercharger replacement due to abnormal noise (free of charge) Left catalytic converter replacement. Beats me what could have caused it to fail. Fuel trim values follows left and right cylinder bank very well which in turn does not point to vacuum leaks, exhaust leaks or injector problems. I did however change the plugs just after I bought it because there were a slight miss. I guess that this slight miss caused the problem to begin with. Time will tell. Signal horn replacement Trunk lid gas springs replacement Multi-function lever replacement Alarm modules failed (motion sensor and inclination sensor shortly after) Front wheel hub replacement I also have an annoying sound during warm up also. Can’t hear it when the car is cold or warm, it seems to manifest itself just above 70F or so and goes away when the engine gets warmer. My guess is either the alternator or servo steering pump. Over all I am very happy with it. It has tremendous power and stopping power, excellent road holding abilities, is extremely easy to drive (though it can scare the crap out of you, for instance wheel spin at 100 mph on a rainy road is no problem to achieve) and is fairly easy to work on when it comes to service at least. I don’t trust garages however. I know that I could have done the work better if I only had the space and the right tools. Screws and nuts overtightened, parts mounted the wrong way, shortcuts and wrong parts and fluids is just what you can expect, even at the trusted garages sometimes if you aren’t watching them like a hawk. I had to let the garage change the cat and the wheel hubs. Since we don’t have more than one car in the household I didn’t have time and space to do the converter. I really tried and tried the hubs but had to give up and it was a bit more shameful to me because I have always changed bearing hubs myself. L The shop had to remove the steering knuckle in order to press them out. But I will be prepared the next time. Found a tool called the hub grappler on the internet that I think will do the trick.
  2. The P1372 code and MAP sensor are unrelated. P1106 was the code for the MAP sensor so it makes sence that you still got the P1372 BEFORE the Crankshaft Position Sensors were replaced. Are there still codes precent after the Crankshaft Position Sensors were replaced? If not then there is another problem and it has propably something to do with the MAP connections since it is the only other code you have got. From my own experiences it seems rare that a sensor breaks. Usually bad connections and damaged wiring seems to be the problem. The Crankshaft Position Sensors are located on a tight spot but not that difficult to replace after you remove the oil filter adapter. I've done it myself
  3. I would also pull the MAP-connector (it sits on top of the throttle body), spray it with WD40 and disconnect/connect the connector 10-15 times. This excercise cleans the connector and restores the connectivity. Also try to wiggle the cables with car running and see if you can get it to stall. If you have a problem with a bad connection (apart from the oxides that you cleaned away in the previous step) it can either be the connector itself or the wires. I had a code for the MAP-sensor a couple of years ago and a little love and WD40 solved it
  4. Hi all! I’ve just returned home after a total of 2000 miles of driving. We went to southern Bavaria through Denmark for a week J The temperatures was about 90-95F but the V didn’t mind, until I smelled coolant when I was fueling it up…because of a lousy dealer job. Some of you might remember that I let an authorized dealership change the compressor free of charge (replacement because of abnormal sounds). I almost always do what needs to be done on my own cars but since the compressor isn’t exactly free of charge I had to let a shop do the work to get it for free. I told them that I didn’t mind to wait another hour for them to get finished. I’d rather have them do a proper job than rush things through, but that didn’t help at all obviously... When I bought the car from them I pointed out to them (well actually I wrote a long mail) that they claimed the engine oil was changed (it was not), they used cheap after-market brake pads, they did not inform me that the coolant was due for a change etc. etc. Since I do most of the work myself it wasn’t really a big thing. I expected it and thought I could use it as leverage in order to get free stuff, like navigation DVDs etc. According to various sources you can expect that about 60-80% of the Swedish garages charge you for work that hasn’t been done or that they miss faults that should’ve been corrected. Ok. I popped the hood and saw that a coolant hose was rubbing against an idler wheel. The retards obviously didn’t care too much about proper routing and clamping. Nothing to do because the gas station didn’t have hose clamps, pipes etc. I had to call a towing truck after dealing with my insurance company. So there we were. Me, my wife and my daughter in 95F in the middle of nowhere in former eastern Germany. After a couple of hours the towing truck arrived, I drove the V up on the back of the truck and had to leave my wife, daughter and all luggage behind on the gas station because there wasn’t room for all of us and the guy who collected the car wanted me to drive the car off the truck as well. Now it was early night, he drove about 20 miles to some shady part of an old town in former DDR (the truck didn’t have air-conditioning and the driver was smoking, everyone seems to smoke in Germany don’t they?). We unloaded the V and expected to get a cab back to my family but then the guy started the repair. Some hose clamps, a pipe and some coolant later I was heading back to collect the rest of the family and our stuff. Much delayed we arrived at our first planned stop. I will sort things out with the dealer for sure. The V has performed very well, especially given the conditions it was used in. There are always a lot of construction works going on at the German Autobahns but there are also a lot of places where to put the pedal to the metal and go at whatever ridiculous speed you deem safe. The fastest I drove was 286 km/h (almost 178 mph) after the GPS. I say GPS because European speedometers must show 5% higher than actual speed. For long stretches I drove about 125-155 mph with a fully loaded car at about 95F. I once braked REALLY hard from about 165-170 mph to a full stop because of a sudden traffic jam. Everything seems in order, no leaks, smells or funny noises. The V behaved very well, always power when needed and quite comfortable for a sport sedan. No car could outrun me but several of them could keep up for a little while, at least until they had to break for another car before switching lanes to get up to speed again. Imagine for instance a VW driving at 120 mph in the left lane, switching to the middle lane in order to let my pass by while accelerating up to 150 mph (in case I couldn’t keep up and pass him he could go back to the left lane again), slamming the brakes hard because of a truck in front of it and return back to the left lane again to keep up with me. Many BMWs, Mercedes, Audis and VWs did that but they lacked the acceleration even if the top speed perhaps didn’t differ that much. I have also driven on the steepest grades in my life, 24%! Average fuel consumption for the trip was 14.9 mpg which is impressing given my driving!
  5. I correct myself. It should say "The most powerful narrow gauge steam loco in Germany". The most powerful german steam loco is I believe the series 44 (standard gauge). It would be nice to ride a passenger express train like the series 18. It can manage express trains up to 110 mph!
  6. It has really served me well. I still expect to see it on the parking lot sometimes when I look out the window.
  7. We are going to use the V a lot this summer. I use it as a daily driver, even in wintertime but this will be the first vacation use. First I'm going on a trip with my seven year old daughter (wife has to work) to celebrate my father’s 75th birthday. The celebration will be in a northern part of Sweden so I suppose that trip will be about a thousand miles. The second trip will be with my family down to Germany through Denmark (I'm allergic to ferries or rather against dents and scratches from other cars). We are going to the southern part of Germany (Berchtesgaden) and enjoy the scenery, probably visit the "eagles nest" and of course enjoy the V at speed on the autobahn! Hopefully I can convince my wife to ride on a museum small gage railway in a part called Harz. Very steep grades and tight curves on that railroad and they use ten-coupled steam locomotives, the most powerful in Germany with their 700 bhp. Not a Big-Boy with almost 7000 bhp, but a large power for a narrow gauge railway. After that it is probably time for new tires... I hope that you guys are enjoying your vacations!
  8. We recently sold the STS after almost 180k miles in the family (199 k miles on the odometer). It was still running very good, no rust, interior almost as good as new but the age and miles was starting to show. It has the half-case oil leak and small stuff needed attention. The catalytic converter gave up and needed replacement so I replaced it with an aftermarket. But that unit was to small for a 4.6 liter engine so I replaced it once again but this time with an used OEM unit that recently gave up. The new owner has owned a lot of American cars and has also worked as a mechanic on several Cadillacs and therefore had "the right buyer profile". I am convinced it has come to a good new home although he didn't seem to be as picky about cleaning and keeping the exterior/interior in good trim as I am...
  9. I was speaking of the fuel injection connector. It’s a 2002 year model.
  10. Hi all! I just returned from a test drive. The Time Sert kit for sparkplugs worked like a charm (I used the extended kit for deep spark plug holes). A couple of hours work to remove all stuff, use the insert kit and put it back together. (I had to put everything back together and move the STS after a found out the threads was stripped because I want my V to be in the garage at nights). No mechanical noises and a perfect idle. One funny thing happened though. I had removed the electrical connector for that cylinder in order to move the car safely while I was waiting for the Time Sert kit to arrive. When I first put everything back together it ran avfully. A dead miss on that cylinder. I removed the connector and gave it a dab of WD40 and excercised the connector by connecting and removing it about ten times to remove oxides. Then it ran as it should. I have seen that before. If you pull a connector that has not been moved in many years then contact is likely to fail. I guess it is because the contact surfaces has bonded over the years and if ever so slightly disturbed you loose contact. To exercise the connector is a good way to get contact.
  11. Great tip! I've just recently begun using a dentist type of mirror. I guess I'm old school My theory is that I once overtightened that plug with a faulty torque wrench which in turn eventually made the threads fail. I have just ordered a kit from Time-Sert with a couple of inserts. I can't imagine that there are mechanical issues since it ran fine otherwise. No mechanical sounds and no signs of marks from collisions at the top of the piston. Of course carbon build ups could ruin a plug but that engine has been exercised from day one
  12. I thought about contact too. I tried to see if something was present on the top of the piston but it looked ok. This plug had a bend center electrode and the threads was stripped. Could it be carbon build up damaging the electrode?
  13. Hi all! Finally the spring has arrived over here. That means summer tires, a thorough cleaning and waxing and a general tune up on the cars! I finished my V so I thought it was time to do my wife’s STS, so I started it up and was heading for the garage but suddenly it started to miss. Pulled the plugs today and found out that the threads were gone at one of the cylinders at the rear bank. If you recall, I had a problem about one year ago when I found a plug at that exact location with a destroyed center electrode. That plug was loose then so I figure that the threads were severely weakened when the plug was rocking back and forth. Ironically I used a torque wrench a couple of years ago (in order to go easy on the threads…haha) to install the last set of plugs and I am quite convinced that the wrench was off which in turn caused the stripped threads. About a year later another plug at the exact location was damaged and loose and the threads are all gone. I’m planning on buying a Time-Sert kit for spark plug repairs that supposedly will work with engine in place. I’ll let you know about my findings.
  14. Hi all! Finally the spring has arrived over here. That means summer tires, a thorough cleaning and waxing and a general tune up on the cars! I finished my V so I thought it was time to do my wife’s STS, so I started it up and was heading for the garage but suddenly it started to miss. Pulled the plugs today and found out that the threads were gone at one of the cylinders at the rear bank. If you recall, I had a problem about one year ago when I found a plug at that exact location with a destroyed center electrode. That plug was loose then so I figure that the threads were severely weakened when the plug was rocking back and forth. Ironically I used a torque wrench a couple of years ago (in order to go easy on the threads…haha) to install the last set of plugs and I am quite convinced that the wrench was off which in turn caused the stripped threads. About a year later another plug at the exact location was damaged and loose and the threads are all gone. I’m planning on buying a Time-Sert kit for spark plug repairs that supposedly will work with engine in place. I’ll let you know about my findings.
  15. I agree. The best protection is to get the car rust proof from the factory but if one likes to drive all year around then this is a well working solution ( http://www.dinol.com). Especially since many cars don’t have a very good protection from the factory to start with. Cadillacs don’t rust as easy as other cars but if they are unprotected they will. First they raise the car on a lift and remove the wheels and the plastic panels under it and wash the car with high pressure. I really don't care for high pressure washes for everyday use since the pressure forces water through seals and under coating materials and is hard on the paint. But since they dry the car for a day at raised temperature afterwards it is ok. Then they use a thin wax-based fluid in cavities, doors, beams and sills which also seals the seams between the sheet metal parts. After that they use a thin wax based fluid in the wheel wells and underneath the whole car followed by a thicker coating to prevent abrasive wear from dirt and stones. Best would be to have two Cadillacs. One for wintertime driving and one for summer driving .