Barry94

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About Barry94

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    Enthusiast (250+ posts)

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia

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  • Car Model and Year
    STS 2008 1SE
  • Engine
    NORTHSTAR 4.6L V8 VVT (LH2)
  1. If I did it correctly, the diagram should appear here in this post. Crude hand drawn, however gets the job done.
  2. Thanks BodybyFisher for the notification. I sent Terrence the circuit diagram. Barry
  3. Hi Vince, just happened to check in and saw your post. Here is the text of the information. I don't see any way to attach the diagram, send me a message (IM) with your email address and I will forward the .jpg. (Can you still do an IM in this site?) Thanks, Barry ==================================================================================== There are SEVERAL things that can cause the "Service Ride Control" message to be displayed. You first need to be absolutely sure what component is causing the fault. Error S060 & S061 have nothing to do with the struts. It only involves the position sensor. These position sensors fail frequently. They are expensive to replace. Both my front position sensors failed on my '94. I could not give GM $500.00 each for $25.00 worth of sensors. So I "bypassed" the sensor to keep the computer "happy".. If you check out the wiring and also see if the actuator arm is still connected, and it still sets a code, then likely your sensor has failed. The following is a procedure to bypass a failed position sensor. There are three wires to the sensor. Each sensor has a "supply" voltage, usually 8V DC. Each sensor has a ground wire. Each sensor has a "signal" output back to the computer. When the signal goes outside of it's operating range (Operating Range 0 - 5V), the computer will report a fault with that sensor. The front position sensors work on an output signal of 0 - 5V, where 2.5V is the "normal" output for the sensor when you are driving normal on a flat road. What you need to do is to provide a constant 2.5v voltage to the "signal" line of the sensor. The computer will think you're driving on flat level road. (forever) You do this by removing the sensor from the car and removing the clear "filler" that covers the circuit card in the sensor. I used a sharpened popsicle stick. (Didn't want to destroy anything by using a metal object) Expose the three wires entering the sensor.(On the front Position sensors, Purple=8V, Black=Ground, Orange=Signal back to the computer. Cut them from the circuit card. Attach one end of a 220 Ohm 1/4 watt resistor to the Purple=8V wire. Attach the other end of the resistor to the Orange=Signal wire. Also attach a Zener Diode (2.5V rating) to the Orange=Signal wire, and the other end to Black=ground. (Resistor & Zener Diode available from a electronics store, eg. Radio Shack) This will provide a constant 2.5V reference to the computer. (After you have tested it.) Seal up the sensor with lots of RTV to provide a water/weather tight area of the repair. The computer will never complain again about the sensor. If you are looking for an "easy" fix, then perhaps this is not it. It is however a very inexpensive fix. You do need a little understanding of soldering wires.
  4. I assume you are referring to the front position sensors. If so it would appear that the '94 Eldorado wiring is different than the '94 STS. I sold my '94 a few years ago and the servive manuals went with it as well. I do find it odd that it is different, however, I'm sure the circuitary and sensor for the Eldorado would be the same. If you can get access to an Eldorado service manual, and cross reference the signals in my diagram to the color of your wires, you should be able to build the circuit. Barry
  5. Years ago I replaced the evaporator on my '94 STS. I disconnected the two top engine mounts (dogbones) and loosened the front frame bolts. I think there were about four bolts on each side. I loosened the front pair to almost al the way out, then the second pair not quite so much, then the third pair about half, then the last pair just a few turns loose. This caused the frame/engine cradle/engine to tilt forward and down. It provided 2-3" inches more space between the rear head and the firewall. No problem then to remove the evaporator. The manual said to remove the engine. Don't know if yours would be the same. Barry
  6. Sorry, I have no knowledge of the 2002 DTS sensors. You would need to check out the function of the sensor in a GM service manual. If the circuit description reads the same, then likely the circuit may work as well. You need to know voltage "in", voltage(signal) "out" of the DTS sensor. One circuit per sensor would be the best. You could have a central "feed" (Voltage/signal out) and feed that to all four sensors at the same time. (Would require several long runs of wire, not too practical. "do I need to disconnect the sensor or cut the wires going to it". Post #7 addresses that. I believe that all Cadillac models/years use different color wires. You would need a service manual for your Model/year to know what wires/colors to use. Barry
  7. Great review. A CTS was my first choice to replace the '94 STS, however last year a '08 STS (V8) came along at a great deal. I did have a CTS (3.6 DI) out for a test ride, not as a lengthy a ride as you, and it worked very well. I'm very pleased with the STS, and would have been happy with a CTS as well. Barry
  8. Hi Ken, I sent you the information. If you have any questions, please ask. Barry
  9. Mark, Any method to arrive at 2.5v would work. Even a battery pack with a pair of rechargeable AA would work.(2.6v) The object is to keep the voltage stable around 2.5 volts. A voltage divider would work if you can maintain a constant 2.5 v. Voltage dividers output will depend on the "load", however, the load should not vary as this is a signal input to the computer. I can't verify that, just assuming. The reason to keep the voltage stable is that if it varies too much, then the struts will constantly be switching ride positions. Barry
  10. Mark, The suspension control is not too sophisticated. The struts only have three positions, soft, medium, firm. Soft is set automatically when under approx 30 mph (forget exact number). Medium is the next setting, to approx 30 to 50. Firm setting is around 50-60 mph. The position sensors are there to "over ride" the strut's normal settings. Example -- In a sharp turn, a compressed or extended sensor will switch the strut to the "firm" setting, aiding in controlling the vehicle. As the sensors are compressed or extended, they will change the strut firmness. Both my front position sensors were "modified". I never noticed any difference in handling or ride. Adjusting the struts manually, through the sensor settings is possible, however, it's not a variable result. Note... When a position sensor fails, the automatic setting for the struts is the "firm" setting, all the time. Creates a bit of harsh ride when driving slow. Barry
  11. My corvette is a 1970 LT-1 coupe. I purchased it new in 1970. It's almost all original, including the paint. A couple of years ago I upgraded the transmission to a 5 speed. The overdrive 5th is great on the highway. A fun car, I still enjoy driving it. Barry
  12. In my '94, the AC plugs were junk, in less than 50k mi., the platinum pads were gone, along with part of the electrodes. I then tried the Bosch platinum plug, and they didn't last very well either. I then tried NGK and they were excellent. Worked exceptionally well and lasted a very long time. GM have used NGK in some of the new vehicles. My neighbor had a "shortstar" in his Olds, and the factory plug was NGK. I think Corvettes came with NGK as well. NGK are a quality plug. Not Cadillac, however a few years ago I bought new plugs for my Corvette, Delco, and they were terrible. The quality of manufacture was the worst I had ever seen. The electrodes were all a different length, and welded on the plug at weird angles. I took them back to the Delco dealer, and we went thru about 80 plugs to find 8 that were some what normal looking. These plugs were all made in Mexico. I now have NGK in the Corvette and they work great. Barry
  13. I finally found the diagram I made when I bypassed the sensors. This should help as well. Barry
  14. Sorry, I couldn't find any pictures of the sensor. It's a black (approx) 1.5" x 4" x 1" "thing", attached to the front strut, with a wire attached. There is also a "plastic rod" attached to the sensor that is attached to the lower control arm. It's very obvious when you look in that area. (It's not part of the strut, just attached to it) I didn't think a '93 had these position sensor ??? Barry
  15. There are SEVERAL things that can cause the "Service Ride Control" message to be displayed. You first need to be absolutely sure what component is causing the fault. Error S061 has nothing to do with the struts. It only involves the position sensor. These position sensors fail frequently. They are expensive to replace. Both my front position sensors failed on my '94. I could not give GM $500.00 each for $25.00 worth of sensors. So I "bypassed" the sensor to keep the computer "happy".. If you check out the wiring and also see if the actuator arm is still connected, and it still sets a code, then likely your sensor has failed. The following is a procedure to bypass a failed position sensor. There are three wires to the sensor. Each sensor has a "supply" voltage, usually 8V DC. Each sensor has a ground wire. Each sensor has a "signal" output back to the computer. When the signal goes outside of it's operating range (Operating Range 0 - 5V), the computer will report a fault with that sensor. The front position sensors work on an output signal of 0 - 5V, where 2.5V is the "normal" output for the sensor when you are driving normal on a flat road. What you need to do is to provide a constant 2.5v voltage to the "signal" line of the sensor. The computer will think you're driving on flat level road. (forever) You do this by removing the sensor from the car and removing the clear "filler" that covers the circuit card in the sensor. I used a sharpened popsicle stick. (Didn't want to destroy anything by using a metal object) Expose the three wires entering the sensor.(On the front Position sensors, Purple=8V, Black=Ground, Orange=Signal back to the computer. Cut them from the circuit card. Attach one end of a 220 Ohm 1/4 watt resistor to the Purple=8V wire. Attach the other end of the resistor to the Orange=Signal wire. Also attach a Zener Diode (2.5V rating) to the Orange=Signal wire, and the other end to Black=ground. (Resistor & Zener Diode available from a electronics store, eg. Radio Shack) This will provide a constant 2.5V reference to the computer. (After you have tested it.) Seal up the sensor with lots of RTV to provide a water/weather tight area of the repair. The computer will never complain again about the sensor. If you are looking for an "easy" fix, then perhaps this is not it. It is however a very inexpensive fix. You do need a little understanding of soldering wires. The ideal thing would be to acquire the male/female connectors that are on the sensor and build the circuit in those. Then you simply could unplug the faulty sensor and plug this between the existing harness and the faulty sensor. You should be able to use this method to "fool" the computer on almost any of the RSS sensors. Good Luck. If you have questions, just let me know.