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5thCat

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  • Car Model and Year
    1994 Seville STS
  • Engine
    Northstar 4.6L V8 (LD8/L37)

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  1. The connector on my 94 Eldorado is right on the top of the fuel pump. The pictures I have attached were taken from underneath the car looking back toward the rear. Notice that there is a blue plastic piece in one of the pix. This is a safety of sorts and makes it difficult to disconnect the plug. Hope this helps. http://i1233.photobucket.com/albums/ff383/1CarXpert/94%20Eldorado/P6160016.jpg http://i1233.photobucket.com/albums/ff383/1CarXpert/94%20Eldorado/P6160018.jpg http://i1233.photobucket.com/albums/ff383/1CarXpert/94%20Eldorado/P6160017.jpg
  2. Let us know if your 98 model does indeed have the trunk pulldown feature. If so does it look like the pix I posted in the "how to".
  3. Great color combination. I had a blue 92 model a while back. They are really put together well and as you know, pretty rare (at least decent examples). http://i1233.photobucket.com/albums/ff383/1CarXpert/92%20Riviera/Finalview.jpg I just posted a how to on disabling the pulldown feature. I like the feature well enough, but if it fails it leaves the trunk partially open for rain and who knows what else to get in. When you get another unit at the salvage yard I would make sure it is clean and greased well. eBay is another source as well, but you will need to be sure and get the correct unit (number of wires, etc.) I had a 90 Mark VII with a sluggish trunk pulldown motor and upon investigation I found that the unit was full of birdseed—go figure. I suspect the previous owner snagged a bag of it putting it in the trunk and some of it wound up in the trunk pulldown assembly. I took it apart, cleaned it, greased it, and put it back together. It worked perfectly afterwards.
  4. Love the sound and pull of these Northstars!

  5. Here is one with photo bucket links. Your model might not have this type of set up. Hope it helps. Temporary Fix for Inoperative Trunk Pulldown Motor I’ve done this on a couple of 80s and 90s GM and Ford vehicles and it works perfectly. The pulldown motor will no longer function, but the trunk lid will close completely. The trunk release feature is a separate function and will still work. I recently had to do this for my father-in-law’s 94 Deville just before a huge storm that would have allowed a lot of water to enter his his trunk since the failure of this item leaves the trunk lid partially open. To top it off, all I had was a crescent wrench; thankfully he had the correct size Allen wrench. Tools needed: 1. T10 star wrench or 3/32 Allen wrench (aka hex key) 2. 11 mm socket wrench (7/16 will also work) Remove trim to gain access to the trunk pulldown assembly. Remove two bolts holding pulldown assembly to metal bracket inside the trunk. Use star wrench (or allen wrench/hex key) to remove the 1 screw that holds the black electrical portion to the clear part of the pulldown assembly. http://i1233.photobucket.com/albums/ff383/1CarXpert/Trunk%20pull%20down%20shots/1stscrewtoremoveone.jpg Then use your fingernail or a small screw driver and lift up on the locking tab that holds the black electrical portion to the motor. http://i1233.photobucket.com/albums/ff383/1CarXpert/Trunk%20pull%20down%20shots/lockingtabtwo.jpg Now pull the black piece straight up and lay aside. http://i1233.photobucket.com/albums/ff383/1CarXpert/Trunk%20pull%20down%20shots/electricalconnectorremovedthree.jpg Next remove the two 11 mm bolts that hold the metal plate and latch to the clear plastic part of the trunk pulldown assembly. http://i1233.photobucket.com/albums/ff383/1CarXpert/Trunk%20pull%20down%20shots/twoboltstoberemovedfour.jpg Then pull the metal plate and latch straight up. http://i1233.photobucket.com/albums/ff383/1CarXpert/Trunk%20pull%20down%20shots/pullstraightupfive.jpg Now hold the gear (it is greasy) and turn the latch clockwise several turns. This will make the latch piece that holds the trunk closed to lower itself into the assembly like it did when it was working properly. http://i1233.photobucket.com/albums/ff383/1CarXpert/Trunk%20pull%20down%20shots/geartoholdsix.jpg It has to be a complete turn so that the latch slides back into the grove of the clear plastic part of the assembly when you reattach it with the two bolts. The side with the tab has to be in the correct position (facing the correct way) in order to fit back into the clear plastic part of the assembly. http://i1233.photobucket.com/albums/ff383/1CarXpert/Trunk%20pull%20down%20shots/tabonlatchseven.jpg I cannot remember how many complete turns it takes to position the latch correctly so that it will catch the trunk lid lock—you just have to play with it and see. I want to say it is two complete turns. Put the assembly back together (the two bolts that hold the plate and latch to the clear plastic part of the assembly). It is not necessary to put the black electrical portion of the assembly back on to see if the trunk latches. In fact, this part may be left off altogether. You will see what I mean when you perform this procedure. Reattach the assembly to the bracket in the trunk and test the trunk lid for proper closure. If it does not catch, take it apart again and turn the latch counterclockwise as needed. Finally, use a box top or towel under your work so you can see where all the pieces end up. Nothing flies apart, but you don’t want to lose anything during the process.
  6. Temporary Fix for Inoperative Trunk Pulldown Motor I’ve done this on a couple of 80s and 90s GM and Ford vehicles and it works perfectly. The pulldown motor will no longer function, but the trunk lid will close completely. The trunk release feature is a separate function and will still work. I recently had to do this for my father-in-law’s 94 Deville just before a huge storm that would have allowed a lot of water to enter his his trunk since the failure of this item leaves the trunk lid partially open. To top it off, all I had was a crescent wrench; thankfully he had the correct size Allen wrench. Tools needed: 1. T10 star wrench or 3/32 Allen wrench (aka hex key) 2. 11 mm socket wrench (7/16 will also work) Remove trim to gain access to the trunk pulldown assembly. Remove two bolts holding pulldown assembly to metal bracket inside the trunk. Use star wrench (or allen wrench/hex key) to remove the 1 screw that holds the black electrical portion to the clear part of the pulldown assembly. Then use your fingernail or a small screw driver and lift up on the locking tab that holds the black electrical portion to the motor. Now pull the black piece straight up and lay aside. Next remove the two 11 mm bolts that hold the metal plate and latch to the clear plastic part of the trunk pulldown assembly. Then pull the metal plate and latch straight up. Now hold the gear (it is greasy) and turn the latch clockwise several turns. This will make the latch piece that holds the trunk closed to lower itself into the assembly like it did when it was working properly. It has to be a complete turn so that the latch slides back into the grove of the clear plastic part of the assembly when you reattach it with the two bolts. The side with the tab has to be in the correct position (facing the correct way) in order to fit back into the clear plastic part of the assembly. I cannot remember how many complete turns it takes to position the latch correctly so that it will catch the trunk lid lock—you just have to play with it and see. I want to say it is two complete turns. Put the assembly back together (the two bolts that hold the plate and latch to the clear plastic part of the assembly). It is not necessary to put the black electrical portion of the assembly back on to see if the trunk latches. In fact, this part may be left off altogether. You will see what I mean when you perform this procedure. Reattach the assembly to the bracket in the trunk and test the trunk lid for proper closure. If it does not catch, take it apart again and turn the latch counterclockwise as needed. Finally, use a box top or towel under your work so you can see where all the pieces end up. Nothing flies apart, but you don’t want to lose anything during the process.
  7. I'm going to try to post a how-to on this (with pix). I might have to run it by the moderators. We'll see.
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