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  1. Jan Olsson

    BBF we miss you.

    I miss BBF's posts. All that committed energy and all that knowledge. I'm sure that I'm not alone!
    5 points
  2. Our lovely German host Sarah Sauer takes the 2015 Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid for a spin. The Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid is powered by a 3.0 liter V6 engine making 333 horsepower and than there's an electric-motor that makes 95 horsepower with a total output of 416 horsepower. Together with an 8-speed automatic transmission 0 to 60 mph will come in 5.2 seconds with a top speed of 167 mph. But is it worth the $99,000 price tag? Let's find out! With camera men Jan Gleitsmann and Jens Stratmann of Ausfahrt.tv!
    4 points
  3. Hi! I just wanted to re-introduce myself since it was a long time ago. I'm a male, 46 years old, with wife and a daughter, nine years old. I don't really consider myself to be one of the lucky guys in the world but I'm not a very social kind of person and that goes hand in hand. I have been unemployed the latest two recessions for a couple of years (in Sweden it is the last guy employed who is the first guy who gets sacked when a company needs to shrink their employee force) and have moved around quite a bit (in Sweden) just to keep myself occupied. You know the kind, the guy with few personal connections who has to take the job no one else in their right minds will take. Some organization theorists believe that there are three kinds of people, the guy who just tags along, the guy who likes to be in charge and me, the guy who likes to be the specialist. I'm working as a mechanical engineer (currently on a company producing labels and my department is manufacturing labeling machines with me as the head engineer). I develop all new equipment even if the whole department take credit from my achievements, especially if they weren’t involved in the process at all, like sales people, my boss etc. My wife is a nurse specialized in cancer treatment (half boss too). Anyway we had to commute so the time to do fun things like working on cars, write on forums etc. was limited. We live in a small town because we really don't want to live in a violent and criminal town like Malmoe (where I am working). The Covid-19 outbreak forced me to work from home which by the way suits me just fine since I can't stand half of the people on my department (not to mention being in Malmoe) I've been working as a mechanical engineer in almost 25 years and have NEVER been surrounded by so many freeloaders. I swear that if the management kicked half of the employees we couldn't tell the difference! As an example we had an inventory of the stock the other day, on guy was "sick", a girl aged about 25 complained about that she was not supposed to be there because it wasn't her job, and also complained about her nails being damaged from counting O-rings and washers. I told her to shut up and count how many spring turns there are on the spring and work instead of complaining. 😉 I've been on the Caddy info forum since 2002 and have owned an Eldorado (1988 year model with about 150k miles on in when sold, 50 k miles from my driving) a 1993 STS (with about 150 k on it when sold, 50 k miles from my driving) a 2002 STS (about 210 k miles on in when sold, 190 k from my driving) and am the happy owner of a 2012 CTS-V. The V currently has about 100 k on the odometer (70 k miles from me). Our family (daughter, wife and me) also like Jeeps. We have owned a 1990 Cherokee, a 2004 Wrangler and the latest one was bought last year. A 1999 Grand Cherokee. Of course people think that we are insane when we buy a 20 year old car with almost 200k on the odometer but I saw it as a recreational project. I always try to do as much as possible by myself when I work on our cars. No need to pay someone to damage or mistreat the car, I can do a better work for free. I only have access to a very small garage. Just enough space to change oil, brake pads and other small stuff. On the Jeep I've replaced all cooler lines and hoses, alternator, AC-compressor, radiators, brake pads and discs, brake booster, rear exhaust system, fan coupling, some sensors and electrical motors too. Payed the local shop to do the brake lines and rusted out door sills and some other small stuff. Now we have a 4wd in “daily drive condition” and a car that we use in terrain and all year around costing $0 in financing. Just got to fix the leaking valve gaskets and some minor stuff. We used it on a 3000 mile drive this vacation without the slightest problem. Now I thought it was the time to buy an older car. I bought a 1949 Chevrolet Fleetline in "daily driver" condition and I am planning to keep it in OEM condition. Unfortunately it is hard to get access to garages in Sweden and I'm searching for a garage to store it and work on it. I have the car stored by the seller at the moment and can go there to do minor work on the car but it is always better to have the car in the near vicinity than 30 miles away. I think it is in need of only smaller work. Adjusting valves, ignition and carburetor, get the clock and speedometer to work and other small stuff like that. Great car, but it is not a Cadillac. I figured that I already have a performance driver so it will be fun driving a Chevrolet anyway The car has an inline overhead valve six with about 90 bhp, three on a tree (first gear unsynchronized), no oil filter (option in the day) and an AM-radio, 6 Volt electrical system and vacuum wipers, no servo steering or servo brakes but it is solid running, no mechanical noises and reasonable rust free. I just love it
    3 points
  4. Classic Roadsters Duke Jaguar SS-100 Replica, Epilogue. I don't know if anyone sees or is following this part of the forum any more, but I thought I would post a final report of my Jaguar ownership experience after reviewing my original thread. On May 22, 2019, I helped load my Jaguar onto a transport trailer to be shipped to its new owner in Phoenix. After six years of ownership that featured lots of fun driving, a few breakdowns, quite a bit of maintenance education and work, we decided we had satisfied our Brit roadster yen and wanted the garage space back. A Craigslist ad brought me a willing buyer with cash. As an investment, the Jaguar was a loser, but considering the money we put into it overall, probably equivalent to the depreciation on any vehicle. I documented most of the work that was done to make the Jag a reliable and attractive car in my first thread. At the end, it was in fact very reliable. The last recurring problems turned out to be fuel system issues that were working together to be hard to diagnose--carburetor and fuel pump. The rebuilt carb I installed was not internally calibrated quite right, including wrong jets, so a professional rebuild of the rebuilt solved one part of the equation. But it was still stalling. That turned out to be due to bad fuel pumps. The Duke was built with a non-stock electric fuel pump mounted just below the tank. The original and first replacement pumps were overheating and cutting out. My mechanic finally installed a racing-duty pump which totally solved the stalling problem. Like folks say about boats, it was a happy day when we bought the Jaguar, and a happy day when we sold it. No regrets. Loved the experience and even learning from the problems. And over 4,000 miles of joyriding. And so we move on. I hope folks who own, or think about owning or have interest in replica cars, and the Duke model particularly, find something of interest or encouragement in what I have shared. And to whoever owns our Jaguar now, and wherever they may be, happy driving!
    3 points
  5. Jsblkram

    Jsblkram

    Fantastic !!!!!!! Replaced alternator with the AC Delco from RockAuto. Battery is charging just fine. Took some time but with the help from u guys it is now back on the road. Many, many thanks for the info to help me figure this out. Thank u !!!!!!!!
    3 points
  6. Lance, More than likely the cylinder walls and the rings are a little rusty. Is it on an engine stand? Does it move slightly or is it locked solid? Pull the spark-plugs if there were any installed, or the plastic caps and with an oil squirt can, squirt about a spoon full of engine oil in each cylinder and let it sit for about an hour. Try turning/rocking the crankshaft, if it won't move let it sit overnight and try again. If still no movement rotate the engine assembly so that one bank of cylinders is vertical, let it sit for an hour or so and then turn the engine so the other bank is vertical. Rinse & Repeat as needed. Once it starts moving, simply keep working it back and forth until you start getting complete revolutions, then you can go in the direction of normal rotation, CW if IRC
    3 points
  7. Well I have to say I really enjoy this site and hope it does not hook up with any other Caddy sites I have gotten lots of good info from my 1993 DEVILLE and I actually have a service light on with a code I need to address when I get some more time. I especially enjoy the respect given here along with good solid INFO thanks Bruce for a great place foe Caddy owners
    3 points
  8. To some degree I would concur, at least on the heavier viscosities. But not a 10w30? Quiz question: what is the kinematic viscosity at 100c (read that as the operating temperature of the engine) of a 5w30 vs a 10w30? Answer: The same! At operating temperature, 0w30, 5w30, and 10w30 all have the same kinematic viscosity of around 10.5 to 10.9. The only difference between them is the winter cold flow rating, which is what the "w' stands for. And that has more to do with cold starting than running the engine. The "w" is not a oil weight rating but a cold flow rating. Go to the SAE website and they will confirm this. And even then, unless one is dealing with some serious nasty cold at start up, it is not really an issue. Michigan gets cold, but not real nasty cold except in the U.P. (yes, I travel Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, etc frequently year round). A 10w30 full synthetic generally will have a -40F to -45F cold flow pour point along with a rated cold crank start rating of -25F to -30F. So unless one is in Calgary, MT, ND, or Fairbanks, AK type of weather, a 10w30 will be fine. For those like me, that the car resides in a heated garage when not in use, a 10w30 will work just fine year round. It rarely gets below -20F in my area in Central Iowa. I lived outside of Fairbanks, AK for 10 years and used 10w30 conventional with no problems. But then, we were smart up there... we had block heaters, oil pan heaters, and electric battery blankets that all got plugged in when the vehicles were at home. That all being said, everything from my Yamaha portable generator on up thru my class 8 commercial trucks all get 10w30 oil. Different types, but still 10w30. My 2015 2500HD, my 2006 CTS, my JD zero turn mower, my JD 825i Gator, my ag tractor, my 2013 Freightliner semi trucks. 10w30 has a lower volatility rating (NOACK vaporization rate) than either 0w30 or 5w30, it also uses less viscosity improvers which can shear under extreme pressure, and it maintains a more level viscosity rating over the entire oil change interval. Many full synthetic 10w30 oils are actually straight 30w oils, but qualify due to their cold flow rating as 10w30. I have long since become very fond of 10w30 oils for all these reasons. And most full synthetic 10w30 oil will meet GM 4718M and 6094M specs, which are the basis of what dexos1 is built upon. The dexos1 spec just specifies a 5w30 minimum to cover all the bases of what most folks deal with in N. America. In some ways, it is not even as good at ILSAC GF-5 rating, which has a better ethanol emulsification spec than dexos1. Which seems strange, since GM is all over the idea of using ethanol.
    3 points
  9. I am pleased to announce that I, ME, MY, have something to contribute, besides a question.... I went to the local Cadillac dealership (Vic Alfonso- Portland, Or.) that originally sold my baby in 2002 and while ordering some touch-up paint (just in case), I asked the counterman, Gary, if it was possible to have a print out of the original invoice, or what ever they called it, for my records. "Sure, all I need is the VIN number." Gary replied. "DONE!" I responded....and 5 minutes later I left the lot with the read-out. Of course, this might have happened for a couple of reasons, not the least of which was my disarming charm, or my gorgeous wife batting her baby blues, or the fact that it originally was sold on that lot...never-the-less, I've answered my own question. Hope this helps others who would like a copy of their ride for their files.
    3 points
  10. Logan

    2007 DTS

    From the GM DVD manual...2007 DTS... A drain trough encircles the sliding window panel and leads to the drain hoses. The drain hoses are located at each corner of the sunroof module assembly. The two front drain hoses route down the windshield pillars. The two rear drain hoses route down the rear sail and the quarter panels. If you encounter a wet headliner or other water leak, inspect the following areas for the source of the leak: • The windshield • The rear window Verify that the drainage system is not plugged or restricted. Use the following procedure: Using a one pint container, pour water into the drain trough with the sunroof window open. Inspect for water drainage through the drain hoses exiting the wheel house areas. If the water flow is restricted, use a low volume of compressed air in order to clear the drain system. Do not blow the drain hose away from the housing drain spout. Retest the system. If water drips from the headliner above the door, lower the headliner as required in order to inspect for a proper drain tube connection. If necessary, install new tie wraps onto the drain spouts of the sunroof module assembly.
    3 points
  11. First I'd like to thank everybody on this board for the help I received with this problem. I ended up replacing the complete fuel line from tank to engine compartment metal tubing. I also dropped in an AC Delco fuel pump. Car started to run like a champ so I took it out for a test drive. I made it about 15 to 25 yards and the engine died. Checked the fuel pump and I could not hear it running. So I had a friend drive and slowly poured fuel into the carburetor to get it back into the yard. Dropped the tank again and found the new AC Delco pump was bound up. Like a dummy I didn't put a sock on the pickup tube. This forced me to stick my hand down in the tank and see if there was anything in their. To my surprise I found a bunch of rubber particles and black rubber dust in the tank. Then I remembered the first pump I took out had the blackest sock I had ever seen on the fuel pump. So now it's down to taking the tank off and send it out for an acid bath or just buy a new tank. I opted for buying the new tank and be done with it. So what was happening, while driving the fuel was mixing with this rubber type dust and making its way to the throttle body. Bad fuel, bad performance. I'm chalking this one up to experience and thank everybody again for the help.
    3 points
  12. I watched the video a few times and it looks like the freeze out plug in the head is leaking, is that correct? Here are a few close ups. You will notice on one head the cam pulley is removed and in the other head there is no intake cam for locational perspective.
    3 points
  13. Göran W

    I need help.......

    Ok. Like this?
    3 points
  14. Link; https://plus.google.com/113969460069344266731/posts/i4WipmeZqrf
    3 points
  15. mjkubba

    STS

    As I promised first patch of my Cadillacs photos: More to come...
    3 points
  16. I'm pretty much talking about the body, paint and interior. Although a lot of the mechanical parts are too. Even the shocks and struts.. They do need changing though.. It took me 10 years to do it, but this is my 400th post!! WOO HOO!!
    3 points
  17. Problem: Parking brake does not release automatically Car in question: Seville 1998 – 2004 Symptom: Parking brake applied. Engine running, transmission lever set in gear. Parking brake does not release by itself, but when parking brake pedal is pushed slightly further and then released, parking brake will release. How the mechanism works: The parking brake pedal is held down by friction of a spring wound around a cylinder. This cylinder has a toothed wheel on top of it, which engages with a toothed wheel segment connected to the parking brake pedal. If one applies the parking brake, the pedal moves and turns the cylinder against the windings of the spring which gives no friction thus no locking force. Once the pedal is no longer pushed (you take your foot away) it tries to return. The cylinder tries to spin in the opposite direction with the windings of the spring, resulting in pulling down the spring and thus locking the cylinder, the pedal is held in position. When the solenoid engages to release the parking brake (or the emergency release lever is used), the windings of the spring are pushed open. The cylinder is set free, rotetes and the pedal returns to the normal position. Reason for malfunction: The springs sticks to the cylinder, even when the tension is released. A little metal lever inside the mechanism is slightly out of shape. Remedy: Remove complete parking brake mechanism. To do this, separate the front section of the parking brake cable under the car, below the drivers seat, near the sill. Unhook parking brake cable from plastic brackets (two). Remove sound insulation panel (two screws) and knee bolster (pull down after sound insulation panel is removed). Remove sill molding (pull up carefully). Remove footrest, start with the black plastic insert (pry with a screwdriver from the top), then undo two screws. Undo three 13mm nuts holding the parking brake mechanism to the body. Pry back carpet, remove rubber grommet where parking brake cable enters the body. Move parking brake mechanism downwards until you can reach the electrical connector on top of the solenoid, seperate the connector. From under the car, depress the springs where the parking brake cable enters the body, push cable in and remove complete parking brake assembly including cable. Study mechanism, look from the pedal side into the apparatus. Locate little tin lever which operates spring (second pic). Check how much slack is evident when you operate the emergency lever. Carefully bend lever with a screwdriver or similar tool until free play is nearly gone. Test release operation by applying the pedal and using emergency release lever. Can pedal be moved back easily? See linked pictures: Put everything back together in reverse order. Time needed: 2 hours (relaxed working) Tools needed: Set of screwdrivers Pliers 1/2“ ratchet set 1/4“ ratchet set Shop lamp Some patience Hoist helpful, but not mandatory. Parking brake cable can be worked on lying on the ground by the drivers side of the car. Please bear in mind that I'm no native english speaker, in case there are spelling mistakes.
    3 points
  18. Hi Bruce and others I notice your in Plano, Tx I just moved from Oregon to Greenville, Tx which is just east of you I used to work for GM at the Tech center in Warren, Mi back in mid 1980s to early 1990s Frankly you need to find a better dealer or shop as their diagnostics game plan is lacking So just doing some thinking 1. PCM uses a 5 volt ref to several engin sensors such as CAM, Crank, TPS, APP, MAF, AIR, etc. So if the fuse for 5 volt (of PCM) or the PCM itself was faulty there would be a lot more problems and DTCs tripped so to me that leaves it is not a PCM issue 2. You did not mention if the engine goes into limp mode, if it does I would go right to diag APP (gas pedal and TPS) as 2 of your DTCs are drive by wire issues. Depending on model year APP consists of 2 or 3 pots, the TAC (DBW controller) is doing multi checks to assure APP is not faulty and would cause a run away vehicle and cause a crash. Simply with a good OBD-II scanner (as I show below ) even with just key on, engine off APP and TPS can be seen if APP and TPS agree or not. 3. Also, can use the scanner to see if 5 volt ref is functional 4. Should be checking for TSBs for that vehicle as many times the problems are weak crimps of wiring pins or the wiring loom has no slack such as to APP and causes stress to wiring pins connections As example : SUBJECT:Service Update for Inventory and Customer Vehicles Main Engine Harness Wire Chafe Expires with Base Warranty MODELS:2016 Cadillac ATS-V This service update includes vehicles in dealer inventory and customer vehicles that return to the dealership for any reason. This bulletin will expire at the end of the involved vehicle's New Vehicle Limited Warranty period. PURPOSE This bulletin provides a service procedure to inspect and, if necessary, reposition the main engine-wiring harness on certain2016 model year Cadillac ATS-V vehicles. In some of these vehicles, the orientation of the main-engine wiring harness could cause the wires to contact and chafe against the right-front valve cover bolt and washer. If the engine-wiring harness insulation is compromised, the vehicle’s tachometer, powertrain, and automatic-braking systems could be effected. While this condition could—if uncorrected—cause a loss of propulsion or the activation of the automatic braking system, GM has no reports indicating that either event has occurred on a vehicle in the field. This service procedure should be completed as soon as possible on involved vehicles currently in dealer inventory and customer vehicles that return to the dealer for any type of service during the New Vehicle Limited Warranty coverage period. So check for other TSBs such as VEHICLES INVOLVED 16 ATS-V TSBS Check for how the DTCs are defined will help zoom into the areas to look at first such as : Symptoms of a P2135 code can range from stalling when you come to a stop, total lack of power, no acceleration, sudden loss of power at cruise speeds or stuck throttle at current rpm. Additionally, the check engine light will illuminate and the code will be set. Potential Causes of P2135 DTC It's been my experience that the wiring connector or "pig tail" on the throttle body gives problems in the form of a poor connection.The female terminals on the pigtail corrode or pull out of the connector. Possible bare wire on pigtail shorting to ground. The top cover on the throttle body distorted preventing the gears from turning properly. The electronic throttle body is faulty. The accelerator pedal sensor or its wiring failed. The engine management computer has failed. The TPS sensors were not correlating for a few seconds and the computer needs to be cycled through its relearn phase to restore active response to the throttle body, or the computer needs reprogramming at the dealer. Diagnostic / Repair Steps A few points about the electronically controlled throttle. This system is incredibly sensitive and vulnerable to damage, more than any other system. Handle it and its components with extreme care. One drop or rough handling and it's history. Apart from the accelerator pedal sensor, the remainder of the components is in the throttle body. On inspection, you will notice a flat plastic cover on the top of the throttle body. This houses the gears to actuate the throttle plate. The motor has a small metal gear protruding up through the housing under the cover. It drives a large "plastic" gear attached to the throttle plate. The pin that centers and supports the gear fits into the throttle body housing and the top pin fits into the "thin" plastic cover. If the cover is distorted in any way, the gear will be compromised requiring total replacement of the throttle body. Pull the electrical connector out of the throttle body. Inspect it closely for missing or bent female terminals. Look for corrosion. Clean any corrosion using a small pocket screwdriver. Place a small amount of electrical grease on the terminals and reconnect it. If the terminal connector has bent or missing pins you can pick up a new "pigtail" at most auto parts stores or from the dealer. Inspect the top cover on the throttle body for cracks or warping. If any are present, call the dealer and ask if they sell just the top cover. If not, replace the throttle body. With a voltmeter, probe the accelerator pedal sensor. It will have 5 volts for reference and next to it a varying signal. Turn the key on and slowly depress the pedal. The voltage should climb from .5 to 5.0 smoothly. Replace it if the voltage spikes or it has no voltage at the signal wire. Look online for wire terminal identification on the throttle body of your vehicle. Probe the throttle body connector for power to the throttle motor. Have a helper turn the key on and slightly depress the pedal. If no power is present, the computer is at fault. If there is power the throttle body is malfunctioning. -------------------------------------- If problem is resolved, problems still might happen but it could be now that APP and TPS are NOT rezoned to PCM Some GM makes to rezone TPS as to angle of TB butterfly is with key on, engine off, disconnect the wiring connector of TPS PCM will trip a TPS DTC and set TPS angle at zero angle, go key off, plug TPS connector back in, turn key back on and PCM will rezone TPS angle to zero, Clear any DTCs JR _ Team ZR-1 Corvette Racing - Custom GM PCM and TCM Tuning
    2 points
  19. Hi guys sorry for not noticing this post before tonight. I have the unique privilege of having built a custom Art car from a retired police car. The B -Body and G body are essentially the same chassis with and extra 10inches of length added behind the drivers seat. I used a complete harness and all amenities from the Fleetwood in the Caprice. So I have run through the entire harness and merged. That power drain of 5mA is the delayed accessory buss controller pull the module and check again. However it never caused a battery drop below 11 volts for me so I always started. I was using a Optima Red that is kind of like a battery backup battery in it's discharge curve. If you had 8VAC on the battery during running there was probably a drain through the same bad diode module not measured. The cop cars came with a larger 138A alternator and a different drivers side bracket to support the big alternator with the heated front windshield option for the L91 caprice this bracket and alternator can be had from dealer as recent as monday a week ago. It uses a longer belt as well I installed one on my suburban. Also that noise in the AC is called slugging I worked for PRO at that time and we had hundreds of complaints but just replaced the compressors during the warranty rather than issue a bulletin. What the issue is , there are two versions of the R4/R11 compressor the R11 has about 50% more displacement but physically the same size. The larger evaporator on the Fleetwood and second Rear AC on Escalade and Suburban causes liquid to be present on the suction side of the compressor when using a R4 in place of an R11. Hense slugging and compressor failure. If you have the noise then you have a couple of options On g-Body you can swap out the evaporator with a B-body on the GMT400 Escalade and Suburban they went to a Sankyo compressor in 1996 junk yarding can find the complete bracket set , hoses and pulleys for about $150 the Compressor for 60 on amazon
    2 points
  20. This is my 92 Seville. Yes, it is a Seville and not an STS. I bought all STS body panels and bumpers from a salvage, painted them, and installed. It has been my daily driver for about a year and a half. I recently changed jobs and needed to drive 35 miles each way for 3 months of training. I was getting about 17 mpg so, I bought a 2017 Jaguar XF 20d. 42 mpg. BUT, that doesn’t mean I am getting rid of my Cadillacs. I have 5. The Seville has been very slowly losing coolant for a year or more. I’ve tested for head gasket leaks several times and nothing. Time for intake gaskets. Anyone who has been around long enough to remember “the guru”, may remember talk about some factory test cars with the 4.9 that had some interesting modifications. There were quite a few back then who wanted to try this but to my knowledge, it was never done. Photo of the project in comments.
    2 points
  21. I do it every year. At least 1 every year, occasionally 2. Best tips. Fill gas tank full. Will keep tank clean and prevent moisture. Non ethanol, high octane is all I run period Put fuel treatment in the tank for how many gallons it takes. I do not disconnect the battery. I put a trickle tender on them all winter. Keeps battery warm and maintained. Leave the car sitting normally. Not on jacks, ramps, etc... I highly recommend running it to temp at least once a month. Helps to keep the oil from completely running down, keep things lubricated and moving. Running up to temp also helps to prevent moisture in the exhaust after shutdown. I get Irish Spring bar soap. 2 in trunk, one on each floor mat, 2 under hood. I open the boxes on both sides, and set. Smells great, and have not had a critter in almost 20 years. If garage is used and subject to water in certain areas I recommend keeping around the car as dry as possible. I personally do not like covers. Have dealt with and without. Still have to wash it either way in the spring. I recommend washing, waxing, vacuuming , and possibly shampooing before storage. Nothing like a clean car in the spring. Better for the finish as well. I pull all 4 mats and put them in the trunk. I realize I am very picky. I leave a temporary mat on drivers floor for when I have to start or move it A commonly missed one is coolant. Check your coolant condition. If coolant condition is not good and or acidic you will likely run into more issues after storage. Acidic coolant seems to cause more damage when sitting than driven. I have stored my Seville for the last 10 years and it is just as clean as when I bought it. Good luck
    2 points
  22. @BodybyFisher got the new alternator, pulled the old one out and there was something rattling around int it. Was able to get some of it out it was very brittle plastic. also there was a bracket that is used to tension the belt for the alternator that was turned and wasn't putting tension on the belt. I got everything back together and it is running great, checked the battery and alternator volts with my dvom and it is charging at 14.6. so I think I got her going. thanks for your replies @BodybyFisher if you see anybody having a similar problem send them my way. and I can add pictures of the tensioner.
    2 points
  23. Logan

    95 Deville - AC ISSUES

    Sudden no AC? Could be a bad compressor clutch coil. The pull in coil can sometimes fail and there will be no way to pull the clutch in. Or....sometimes the air gap wears into excessive gap....and the coil can't pull the clutch in....or it only happens when the engine parts are hot and expand. Both the AC coil and clutch plate can be swapped with the compressor in the car. No need to pull out the Freon. Most AC shops will simply recommend a complete new AC compressor assembly. They make more money that way. The actual style of the assemblies varies based on what brand of compressor etc you have....but the principal is the same. The brand can vary depending on year and engine etc. Some cars may have 2-3 different brands of compressors used on the same engine and year. I had one go out recently on a non-GM product...of course it happened on the hottest day....taking daughter to airport in rush hour....just as we were getting on highway.. Typically around $50 in parts.
    2 points
  24. check the main ground near the starter, make sure clean and tight along with battery connections.
    2 points
  25. First off Longest title ever😁 Have someone remove the gas cap and listen as you turn the key on. Pump should prime for 3 seconds. It was very common in this era for the fuel pump plug to burn atop the fuel pump unit. Fails unexpectedly when you least expect it. Not sure if yours has a access under the back seat for it. Post results first and We can go farther with diag Welcome to CaddyInfo
    2 points
  26. Logan

    Eldo engine swap

    This pretty much covers it... http://www.northstarperformance.com/interchange.php Dogbones were not used after 2000 except for Eldos....but the holes are there for the brackets. Buried in the details.....a different crankshaft in 2000....."A new crankshaft with a different reluctor wheel (crank position wheel) is used"
    2 points
  27. Service Manager at the dealership forwarded me this email today: He says the warranty on the repairs has now been bumped up from the regular 12 months to 24 months (36,000 miles). I should get a packet in the mail soon. GM rep called me back and apologized, she didn't realize that the extended warranty trumped he offer of OnStar (apparently they are not allowed to do both), so her request for free OnStar was declined. Oh well, I'd rather have the warranty and call the tow truck myself anyway. I guess when it all boils down, they really did try to make it right. Car is still running perfect.
    2 points
  28. winterset

    My DeVille Got Hit

    Sorry this happened to your car. you might have to put your boxing mitts on to fight with the insurance company, but believe me when I tell you that paint technology, and color matching and blending has come a long way. Your initial check from the insurance will be a lowball figure. bringing it to the right restoration/ custom paint shop will help. The shop will dictate how to properly repair the vehicle. Google around to see a local shop that specializes in custom paint, and see how they can help. GOOD LUCK
    2 points
  29. Hustle Hard, Help Others, Rinse, Repeat.
    2 points
  30. Yep, it sure does make sense. The A/C clutch fuse is eventually spliced into the relay power or "hot" side. Eventually, to the PCM for control of the fan speed. Good job, Gotta love a story with a happy ending.
    2 points
  31. Ok....looking at the GM service manual....there are some differences between factory LHD and RHD. That explains why these cars have a center style HVAC case. (center oriented heater core for example). Are you checking the correct actuator? More to come...it appears there may be a different HVAC case depending on LHD and RHD. Anyway....couple of tidbits seen in the service manual.... #1 is car has to be running for proper calibration.. #2 is a service bulletin #3 shows center mounted HVAC case.
    2 points
  32. When Timeserts are used, the proper installation is to install the inserts in all 20 head bolt holes in the block. The Timesert kit comes with all the necessary tools to install the inserts. You will need to purchase the additional inserts - I think 10 are included in the kit. Regardless of the method you use, you're not going to have to remove the heads again - it's stronger then when it left the factory. Even if you did have to remove a head for some reason, the head bolt would spin in the insert - the inserts are swaged and Loctited to the block.
    2 points
  33. OK I am calling this problem fixed (been a week with no issues). It was the Vacuum controller (also called vacuum control valve/manifold) mentioned in an earlier post by I believe rockfangd and also BBF (Thanks for that). My vacuum has gone from a very erratic 10-20hg to a steady 23 hg. Its interesting at startup and idle it is only about 13-15 hg other then that it is a pretty solid 22-23 hg (at stop lights and what not). This tells me the vacuum canister must be doing its job. Here is a link to rockauto of the part I replaced http://www.rockauto.com/en/parts/acd...rol+valve,7036 . Once you do your basic troubleshooting to verify Vacuum lines are OK and if you are still having a problem I would strongly suggest replacing this valve as it seems to be somewhat common problem, doesn't cost too much and is very easy to replace. To replace it all you have to do is take the passenger hush panel down, reach up and unlatch the valve, remove the vacuum line assembly (unplug it), reverse for the install (had no idea it was so simple until I did it as it sounded like a horrible job to replace :-). I did remove the glove box (also easy) and would probably suggest you do that just so you can see better, I also borrowed the wife's hand mirror (with a base and swivel) so I didn't have to stand on my head to see under the dash. The hardest part was getting the little spring clips off that holds the vacuum block on to the valve (still no big deal). If you do have this problem and you want to troubleshoot I would strongly suggest you get a mighty vac, they run under 50 bucks and it can double as a vacuum gauge. I put my mighty vac in line with the vacuum actuator that controls the flow between the face vents and defroster (also easy to do, the line is under the driver side hush panel) and ran it that way for a few weeks, every time I had the problem the vacuum would drop to 0, then after a few minutes it would bounce back until the next time it failed. If you decide to use a mighty vac this way be sure it is not in direct sun as I laid mine on the dash (in July heat in Austin TX) and I think it blew a gasket as it kind of jammed up, I did get it warranted though. I can't believe I have been living with this problem so long with such an easy fix. Anyone else like me and rely way too much on these forums for answers :-) . Before the net I use to just go after problems until they were fixed, now it seems I have to find the problem on the net first and get answers before I tackle them. I guess I figure if I can't find the answer in the forums it must more work then I want to complete. LOL The interesting thing is I found a lot of post with this problem but very few that provided definite answers and hardly any that pointed to this vacuum valve. Hope this helps others. Thanks again!
    2 points
  34. MMMmmm....hang on.....pretty sure it was GM that had the huge fire in 1953. http://www.autotran.us/TheGreatHydraMaticFire.html There are one or two current transmissions that GM and Ford developed together for cost savings. Would have to go look it up.
    2 points
  35. I am in the process of getting my 98 Concours with over 180000 miles on it back in descent condition (mostly because it is still my favorite vehicle), some of you have helped me with my front Struts and AC vents recently via other post. I have put less then 1000 miles on it in the last year or so and probably less then 5000 in the last 5 years. Anyway it is finally in good enough shape I can trust it to take small road trips and over the weekend we went from Austin to San Antonio via a fairly new toll road called 130 that has a speed limit of 85 MPH. I am not really a fan of toll roads or these speeds really and this one cost way to much just to drive 45 miles or so but I sure had fun setting the cruise at about 87 MPH and just cruised in style for about 30 minutes with virtually no traffic. I think this is what this car was built to do, lope along at these speeds with plenty more left . I could be wrong but I suspect this speed is something unique to just a few states so thought I would share and maybe brag just a little about legally doing 85+ in a vehicle that still gets over 20 MPG while doing this. Have fun!
    2 points
  36. Ok, I spoke to Samuel by phone. He lives in DC. It was helpful to speak to him to get the details on what is going on His DIC lights up briefly when the key is turned on then goes blank. It seems to be intermittent, he said that after he checked the fuse, it lit for 5 minutes then blacked out again. The digital gas gauge - works The digital odometer - does not work The digital trip mileage - does not work The digital vehicle speed indicator - does not work When he attempts to go into the diagnostic mode (warmer / off buttons), the DIC does NOT light up, but he can tell its in the diagnostic mode because other things on the dash light up like ABS, etc, but the DIC does not light up. The lights at the TOP of the center instrument panel work, ABS, SECURITY, CEL, Seatbelts, etc but nothing digital except for the fuel gauge. My observation without checking the schematic, it is odd that the digital gas gauge works but nothing else digital works unless that is by design, and on a separate circuit. He has checked fuses, and cleaned some grounds. I am not sure if he cleaned the correct grounds, I think Samuel implied that he cleaned grounds in the trunk. The car does not get wet inside, no leaks, no dampness. This problem happened suddenly. I would check the following We are unable to extract the codes, this car should be taken to a dealer to extract ALL powertrain, body, IPC, Chassis and Network codes to start with. IGN 0 Body 10 Amp Fuse, it is HOT in RUN or OFF, check for corrosion and continuity Check for Ignition power at A4/C1, see fuse block details, Page 8A-11-0, depending upon console / column shift Check for Ignition power at A3/C1 Check 20 Amp Cluster fuse for continuity and corrosion, including the socket. Check ground at S201 and G203, I included the location of these 2 grounds below. Here is S201 Here is G203 It is possible that this digital cluster may need to be repaired at an authorized GM repair center. To find one I would call or visit the local Cadillac dealer and speak to the service manager and see if they have any places that they recommend for digital instrument panels. I had a place I used but they are no longer in business.
    2 points
  37. Intermittant problems are harder to solve, but more rewarding once you do figure it out
    2 points
  38. rockfangd

    Battery no charge

    Lol. I though curse words were only common with ford products, Oh wait it is all of them. Isnt it funny that even changing a light bulb can cause cursing
    2 points
  39. Jim, Wishing your copilot a spedy recovery so she can return to her seat as vehicle navigator.
    2 points
  40. Huge inventory of pre-owned, low-mileage vehicles available online Features easy-to-compare suggested pricing using Kelley Blue Book® Fair Market Range Extension of GM’s Shop-Click-Drive online shopping service DETROIT – Online shoppers in the U.S. looking for a used Chevrolet, Buick, GMC or Cadillac will soon have access to a national inventory of low-mileage former General Motors lease, daily rental and company-owned vehicles never before available to the public in one easy-to-navigate place. GM Chairman and CEO Mary Barra today announced the company is launching the Factory Pre-Owned Collection as another example of GM’s efforts to earn customers for life. “We know that many of our customers who are shopping for a used car want to complete more of the process online, and that number is growing,” Barra said. “GM is already a leader in online new car shopping with our Shop-Click-Drive service, and we are expanding it with the Factory Pre-Owned Collection, making GM the first automaker to offer this choice to consumers.” GM’s Factory Pre-Owned Collection will feature a nationwide inventory of more than 30,000 vehicles, all with fewer than 37,000 miles, and including an extended factory bumper-to-bumper limited warranty. Consumers can easily compare suggested prices on the site to what others in their area have paid using the Kelley Blue Book Fair Market Range, which is based in part on what others in the vehicle’s area have paid for the same or similar vehicles. Customers can also get a Carfax Vehicle History Report on the vehicles displayed on the site. The Factory Pre-Owned Collection site (www.factorypreownedcollection.com) will be available to consumers in February. “Kelley Blue Book’s mission is to provide this type of trusted valuation and car shopping information to help consumers make the best possible purchase decision,” said Jared Rowe, president of Cox Automotive Media Division, which includes Kelley Blue Book. Online shoppers who use the Factory Pre-Owned Collection will follow three simple steps: Browse the inventory to find the vehicle of their choice. Choose a participating GM dealer and reserve their vehicle using the Shop-Click-Drive experience. Finalize their purchase and take delivery of their vehicle from their selected dealer. The Factory Pre-Owned Collection also features a three-day/150-mile exchange program, a three-month trial of the OnStar Guidance Plan and the Sirius/XM Satellite Radio All-Access Package and more. Vehicles also come with roadside assistance and courtesy transportation during the warranty period. “Technology and consumer demands are disrupting the used car marketplace, and GM is leading the way in transforming the way used cars are sold,” said Alan Batey, president, GM North America. “The Factory Pre-Owned Collection creates a simpler, easier experience for our customers and offers them more choices, less hassle and greater peace of mind. It’s also great for our dealers and GM because it introduces new buyers to our brands and increases residual values. Everybody wins.”
    2 points
  41. Yes I remember that. I blamed a WOT for blowi ng my head gasket. Let me say that that WOT went to about 90 well beyond where I drove the engine before I actually abused the engine that day. But I will say this, if it happened that day, it was bound to happen any day at that point, it was a matter of time. A sound Northstar can be driven all day like that. My engine at that point had about 130K. You can see the push back in that thread I cant say we have ever seen anyone cause engine damage or blown head gasket doing a WOT and if it does happen the engine was on its last leg
    2 points
  42. This is definitely a job requiring a Tech 2 to diagnose and/or correct. Unfortunately, you need a certified XLR tech at a dealership to work on it unless you have your own Tech 2 and a set of Service manuals. XLR Folding Top switches are fairly reliable, it's the potentiometers that determine moving component locations that aren't. The pots-potentiometers for my fellow geeks, (or position sensors) are responsible for 90% of the problems associated with the Folding Top. The position sensors (there are three) change their resistance when a component they're attached to moves. Each component has a retracted and extended position and corresponding resistance value (converted to counts by the Tech 2) depending on it's position. The Folding Top Control (FTC) module stores these values. Over time, it's very common for the values to drift as the sensors age, temperatures change, or they become loose -they're only held in place with one fastener. Once the expected (learned) sensor values don't match those stored in the FTC module, a Folding Top movement cycle (extend/retract) will stop. In many cases, when it stopped is an indicator of why it stopped. The Folding Top follows a pre-programmed sequence. When retracting, first, the windows lower. If they aren't indexed, (so they know where their lowered position is, the top will not move.) Nada. Zip. Nothing. If the windows are properly indexed, the front tonneau (three flaps behind the seats) raises, the rear deck lid raises, and the top retracts into the trunk. After that, the rear tonneau extends, and the rear deck lid lowers. To raise the roof, the opposite sequence occurs. Say for example, the folding top doesn't retract after the rear deck lid raises. (This assumes the hydraulic pump is good and the cantilever scissors mechanism that operates the rear deck lid is working properly too.) The front tonneau position sensor may be out of tolerance. Not enough to inhibit operation, but just enough to make the FTC module paranoid that it didn't raise, so it stops the cycle. It takes more time to contort one's body to connect the Tech 2 than it does to run a full diagnostic on the XLR. One of the diagnostic subroutines deals specifically with the Folding Top. It displays the component values (counts) the FTC expects, and shows the actual counts it reads during a movement cycle. By recording the stored values, it's easy to determine which sensor is out of tolerance when it doesn't match up. If they don't match, a Relearn is performed. This procedure records the sensor position counts and over-writes the prior values. In many cases, a Relearn will fix a sensor problem. If the sensor is going (or is) bad, it's just a temporary fix, and the sensor will require replacement. Again, a Relearn is required. This isn't meant to be a complete explanation of the Folding Top's operation, just a quick explanation of the most common problem most owners experience with it. 2004-2005 XLRs appear to be the most trouble-prone, and some changes (with retroactive mods) were made to the sensors in later years. But like anything else, as these vehicles age, they're going to need increasing amounts of TLC. CC
    2 points
  43. I have been hunting down a wicked electrical problem for the last few months, and finally resolved it last night. I want to document my experiences, symptoms, and solutions so that if anybody else encounters this problem in the future, they can save themselves a lot of money, and a LOT of frustration. Problem Background and Symptoms After finishing my timsert job and putting the car back together, I was getting the ABS and Traction Control lights on the dash illuminated. Also, seemingly unrelated, my turn signals did not work. This problem would be intermittent. Once in a while, the ABS/Traction lights would go out while driving, and 1st gear would return. Sometimes the turn signals would work, other times they wouldn't. When things were working right, I noticed a very weird correlation between when I would flick the turn signal stalk, that this would immediately cause the ABS/Traction lights to come on. This relation was very key to solving the problem, something I wish I would have noticed earlier. I did lots of searching on the forums, and even found one other member with this exact turn signal EBTCM issue, but unfortunately he seemed to have never resolved it. I learned that many people had EBTCM issues, and they they tend to go bad on these cars. Scanning the codes on my car (1996 Seville SLS, OBDII), I was getting a current P1602, "loss of serial data from EBTCM". I got out my FSM, and meticulously followed the diagnostics tree in the manual to diagnose the problem. This involves a bunch of steps, which basically probes almost every connector pin on the EBTCM connector to check for continuity, shorts to ground, shorts to voltage, and opens. I ran this full diagnostic tree with my multimeter several times, and always came to the same conclusion at the end of the tree "Bad EBTCM, replace unit". Come to find out, these are $650 from the dealer brand new, so I scoured for one from junk yards and on ebay. I found a used on on ebay, but they guy wanted $299 which I felt was too much for a used one. He is a forum member here, and he agreed to bargain down to a reasonable price (thank you!). I received the used EBTCM, assuming this would alleviate all my problems, installed it, and NO GO. Still not working. I assumed I had just gotten a bad unit. I shipped it back to him, and he tested it in his car, and confirmed it was bad. So, he sent me a new one that he had tried out in his own car to make sure it worked before he sent it to me. Imagine my surprise when I installed it in my car and it still didn't work! At this point, I threw in the towel and gave up. I was planning to sell the car anyways, and would just take my losses selling it with a bad ABS/traction system. But, the turn signal issue was really bothering me, so I decided to try and trouble shoot that system. First things first, I got all new bulbs, and new flasher. Still nothing worked. I took apart the steering column and replaced the turn signal switch. Kind of a pain, and it still didn't fix the issue. Then I decided to follow the FSM's "electronics diagnosis" section. It starts by saying to probe the 3 wires going to the flasher module, check for shorts to ground, shorts to voltage, grounds, opens, AND reference voltage. This is KEY! My multimeter found no shorts, no opens, but I found something very weird in that my brown wire, which was supposed to be system voltage (12v), was only reading 2.3v. So I went in the trunk to access the rear fuse panel, and sure enough found only 2.3v back there as well. While I was back there, I checked all the other fuses since I had things apart, and found all of the other circuits with 12v, except for the turn signal fuse, and the console fuse, both with 2.3v. In the FSM, the electrical diagram for the turn signal wiring shows power for the circuit originating from one of the big Maxi-fuses (30amp) in the front fuse box under the hood. Probing up there, I found the same thing, just 2.3v. Now that's weird, because that is coming RIGHT off the battery (almost), and that was fine at 12v. So, I pulled the fuse, and found a very slight green corrosive haze on the terminal contacts. I wire brushed this clean, re-installed the Maxi-fuse, and checked the voltage - it was now 12v, as it should be. Tried out the turn signals, and they work! But OH MY GOD... so was the EBTCM!! The ABS/TCS lights were off, and I could drive totally normal, no ABS/Traction lights, and use my turn signals. And it worked continously, with no intermittent failures like before. I couldn't figure out why this EBTCM issue all of a sudden became corrected, until I found THIS diagram in the FSM: It shows that the "Batt 3" 30amp Maxi-fuse actually feeds both the turn signal circuit, and the EBTCM main power, through circuit #300. Corrosion on the Maxi-fuse terminals must have been causing a high resistance and therefore voltage drop on this line. All of the wires were intact, with no shorts, which is why when I was doing the EBTCM diagnostic tree, everything checked out. In my opinion, a MAJOR flaw in that diagnostic tree, is that it never asks you to verify +12v on that pin feeding the EBTCM! It has you check for shorts to ground, continuity, and opens, but never queries adequate voltage. Now that my EBTCM is getting 12v, it runs. Of course the module would not operate properly on 2.3v!! I'm surprise it even operated intermitently at that low voltage, but when it DID, flicking the turn signal stalk drew enough additional voltage on that #300 circuit, to cause the EBTCM to turn off, and thus illuminate the ABS/traction lights. Who would have guess that the EBTCM and turn signals were so closely integrated power-wise. The moral of the story... if you have an EBTCM problem AND turn signal problem... CHECK OUT CIRCUIT #300! Check the voltage at the small ABS fuse and Batt3 maxi-fuse under the hood, and the turn-signal fuse in the trunk. If they don't have 12v, you need to trace down where the high resistance in the circuit is. Corrosion on the maxi-fuse was my problem. I pulled my hair out over this issue, and hope to save someone else the hassle in the future.
    2 points
  44. Since the engine 'may' be 'toast', and wait for others to chime in, you may want to perform the 'Italian tune-up' (in case your compression loss is due to extensive carbon build-up in and around rings/valves/etc. Some full throttle (in a safe place) in the lower gears with decelerations in the same lower gears might dislodge carbon deposits accrued. With #1 so low I'm thinking it might not just be carbon but, not a lot to lose, (at this point). Certainly wait for Texas Jim or one of the others with Northstar experience to confirm or refute my advice.
    2 points
  45. I don't like the way he's looking at The Lady in White.
    2 points
  46. Losing about a quart a week sounds like steam pockets in the head. I believe a flo-vent radiator cap is one with a lever on top that can release the pressure; I don't think that they come as the right type for a Northstar because they take a screw-type radiator cap. The whole point of screwing on and off is to release the pressure before the cap comes off, so you don't need a flo-vent lever on a screw-type radiator cap. If the bypass isn't flowing, the radiator pressure isn't 15 psi, or the coolant isn't at least 50% antifreeze, steam pockets will form in the head, accumulate at the thermostat and keep it from seeing the hot water for a short time so that more steam forms, and the steam will force water out the overflow. That can cause your quart of coolant loss a week. Another thing that hasn't been mentioned yet is the water pump belt. The water pump is on the rear of a transverse Northstar, on the front head over on the driver's side by the transmission, and is driven by a big pulley on a camshaft. It has it's own V-belt and tensioner under a cover. Check the belt and make sure that the tensioner is good.
    2 points
  47. Ran by Linear Automotive at lunch after Joel sent an email identifying the part I put in the Roadster as the roll bar end links instead of the a-arm strut bushings. Took the roll bar in and we added that to the repair (repair/replace 2 bushing bolts, reattach roll bar). This shows the right rear leaf springs with the spacer block removed and re-assembled. In hind sight I should have asked the shop to repaint the springs, but task for another day. Work in progress, I just popped in and we were talking about the Roadster while I dropped off parts, and so I snapped some pics of it on the lift. This shows the left rear with the spacers still in the leaf, and the old shock. New right rear shock with concentric helper spring Duke Roadster is at alignment shop this evening, and I am sked to pick up tomorrow at 10 am at Linear.
    2 points
  48. Yeah, I don't drive to far.. Plus, we live close to every thing so you don't have to go far. I was taking care of my mother so I did have a lot of doctors appointments to take her to the last few years. She passed away in Jan, so I'll be driving it even less now.. I couldn't put any in the car. That smell would get my asthma all worked up.. Looks like the spray worked, no trace of anything this AM.. Anywho, I went out and got some lunch and went to the park to eat. While I was sitting there I let it idle and it got as hot as 222 and then went back down to 212 when the fans kicked in. The A/C wasn't on because it's cold out today, In the 50's, with a pretty good breeze. I took some pics there by the lake.. Only a few because it was cold with the wind. Had to be a windchill in the 40's.. It's not super cleaned up, but looks good in the pics, and not bad for 127K..
    2 points
  49. If you like it now, wait until it has all eight cylinders at full compression! Be careful with those tailgaters. Some of them are police. I do find the handling much more effective at losing tailgaters than the engine because at this late date on the East Coast no one expects an old Cadillac to handle like that. I've found that I can easily lose a Lexus with a brisk right turn without my wife noticing anything. And, it's perfectly legal as well as being safe and prudent, so long as you can see what's around the curve before you enter it. If you use the engine they can catch you later by simply ignoring the speed limit indefinitely and I have found that anyone who will tailgate like that will ignore the speed limit. Another tactic is effective if you do see a police car; drive next to it and a little ahead or wherever you can safely place yourself to minimize the distance between the tailgater and the driver of the police car. The last resort is dialing #77; the police are really a good friend on the road if you need one. I had several people track my CTS-V for a bit while on the trip back and successfully ignored all of them, in no small part because I look the part of the fuddy-duddy feather-foot, and I saw one of them pulled over by the Bears. Those guys give the Bears something to do.
    2 points


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