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  1. 1 point
    Well for starters check your oil level. Is the engine noisy? You might just have an oil pressure switch saturated with oil internally. (common problem.)
  2. 1 point
    Logan

    TPS and ICM Question

    They are the same thing. The IAC is just a computer controlled vacuum leak. There are several different ones used over the years. The rest of GM has been using these since the mid 80s. Only Cadillac was using the throttle control motor one. When OBDII came along Cadillac finally started using IACs. Has the intake ever been off? Could be cracked or leaking intake or intake gasket. Or leaking blow off relief valve. Bad gasket on either side of the "crossover" part. Leaking fuel injector O ring. Broken return spring on throttle body shaft or sticking cable. *The leak can be on the underside the intake....which you could never find by spraying around up top. Spraying around.....keep the spray liquid rather than vapor. If you find the leak the high idle will drop momentarily when you hit it with the brake/carb cleaner. ....and you should be able to repeat it every time you hit the leak. As mentioned.....starting fluid is a little too wild for finding intake leaks. I think you will have better luck with brake or carb cleaner.
  3. 1 point
    Logan

    TPS and ICM Question

    The high idle issue is likely related to the the TBI being removed. Maybe wrong gaskets. ....Personally I use brake cleaner or carb cleaner to find vacuum leaks....IMO starting fluid is a little too dicey for spraying around. Some codes will not set if other codes are present. Its possible there are additional chewed wires. Or maybe a broken coil return spring on the throttle body shaft. Being a '96....the car will be using a IAC speed motor. Lacking a scan tool....There is a Kent Moore tool used to diagnose idle speed problems. J-37027-A. With the tool...you unplug the IAC....the tool works as a IAC driver. You can cycle the IAC open and closed independent of the PCM.....very easy to change engine speed with the tool. So if the IAC is cycled all the way closed (low)....and there is still high idle speed....there is a vacuum leak. There is also a noid light that plugs into the vehicle side harness. The noid LEDs will blink green and red all the time to verify the PCM IAC drivers are ok and are trying to control idle speed. The tool comes with 2 noid lights depending on which type of IAC you have....the square 4 plug version or the flat plug in version. Most of the time I use the tool to pulse the IAC apart to clean the shaft.
  4. 1 point
    BodybyFisher

    TPS and ICM Question

    Yes definately pursue that. I found a nice illustration of the area.
  5. 1 point
    rockfangd

    TPS and ICM Question

    Sorry for the delay with my posts. Work too much. Great to hear you found the 1634 problem. I hope you closely inspected the rest of those wires in that plug. As soon as I saw the 0 on that pin that nailed it. You are doing very well. We will get this. Long shot I know but it bears to mention that vacuum leaks do not always cause a lean code. That issue you resolved could cause all kinds of goofy issues. I highly suggest that you go over every vacuum hose, electrical connector, and bolt or nut that was touched throughout the process. If you had a high idle problem that was IAC related it should throw a code also. Be patient as you are making progress
  6. 1 point
    BodybyFisher

    TPS and ICM Question

    Glad to help, I love this stuff! Let me know how it works out, I am very curious as to whether this fixes your problem or whether this is a redundant connection. Remember rosin core solder for electric not acid core (just a reminder).
  7. 1 point
    Thanks Mike, i'm looking forward to posting that all is under control I hope i will soon! The shop is actually in a greenhouse so yeah, lightwise it's amazing, but the downside is when it's a hot summer like we had this year, than one really understands the greenhouse-effect haha.. It absolutely is haha..
  8. 1 point
  9. 1 point
    rockfangd

    TPS and ICM Question

    Yes. Check the voltages at the fuses first before you tear it all apart again. If you find that while running all the fuses show the same voltage or at least within .5 volts of each other then go farther. To ohm the pink wire you would first pull the fuse and verify which side is the input side. It will have 12v with ignition on. You will want to ohm from the other one to the pin at the pcm. Without fuse installed
  10. 1 point
    Sorry I disappeared I work nights, but everything going on with the car is encouraging we going to get back at it this weekend, and I'll keep you posted on how it goes.
  11. 1 point
    Recheck the firing order Check for spark Check plug gap, I believe .035 (wow out of the cob webs) Check that the coil is powered correctly Did you check that the timing chain marks on the cam gear lined up? Fuel pressure, (using OEM pump?) Pull top of carb over check fuel level and that the float is free Choke slightly open, not tight closed Spray starting fluid in carb, does it start? Hold foot to the floor, see if it starts Check compression, add table spoon of oil to each cylinder if low. (I think you did this) Never stand in front of engine when cranking (your hair will get singed off don't ask how I know that lol)
  12. 1 point
    I was thinking if you were nearby, I would try to get to you. That would be fun to watch and bring me back.
  13. 1 point
    We're going to get at it again today. Thanks for that info, we're going to try it and see what happens. I'll keep you posted Dolton Illinois, south of Chicago
  14. 1 point
    rockfangd

    TPS and ICM Question

    last one I had was a freightliner and the Transmission module kept dropping out. All fuses tested good. When plug to TCM was unplugged wire tested good. When plugged in it lacked about 4 volts. So rather than 12 it had 8. That fuse caused a tow bill because when the Transmission module goes down the bus goes nowhere.
  15. 1 point
    I don't want to reinvent the wheel here, or assume you have not done this but its pretty easy. Just bring the engine to TDC, #1 on the compression stroke, ZERO on the timing mark, install the distributor so that the pointer on the rotor is EXACTLY at the #1 terminal on the cap. That should be enough to get you started. Where are you located? Mike
  16. 1 point
    milansky

    Tranny oil leak through main plug

    Has anyone experienced transmission oil leak through its main plug? Connector is full of fuid after disconnecting. No other spot seems to make sense. Thx. Milan
  17. 1 point
    BodybyFisher

    TPS and ICM Question

    Ok, I have done some research. There may be a misprint in the FSM, I am going to try secondary sources. There is a confusion in CKT (circuit) 639 and CKT 539, with a possible misprint I am looking into it further In the print below, they show CKT 639 feeding the ICM directly using a 20 amp fuse (I believe this fuse is called DISTR not PCM (IGN)) I am thinking that they have this circuit mis-labled as 639 and it should be 539. If you look above you notice CKT 639 feeding the PCM at 2 locations (C1-37 & C2-19). This may or may not be an issue but we need to proceed like it is an issue. Besides testing for voltage at the 2 points I spoke about in my prior posting, test for power at the DISTR fuse, with the engine idling. As you can see, if this circuit has problems, it feeds the ignition circuit. I still need to find out what the wire that breaks out at S124 and connects at C2-19 on the PCM controls, I need a scan like the one below showing the PCM circuitry off C2-19. High resistance at S124 may be hurting the voltage supply to C2-19 driving the PCM crazy. When you test for voltage at the PCM (IGN) fuse we will know more. I am going to the library to get into Alldata and see what they have Let me know what you find. Have patience
  18. 1 point
    BodybyFisher

    TPS and ICM Question

    Analysis: Ignition 1 and Ignition Supplement are powered any time the key is in the CRANK, RUN or ACC positions. Ignition 0 is powered in ALL key positions except LOCK and CRANK So, Ignition 0 and Ignition 1, are powered when the key is in RUN, that is when the test is run to determine that the voltage is within 2 volts OR....P1634 is set. Tasks > 1) determine where Ignition 0 and Ignition 1 obtain their voltage (they get it from 2 different fuses), 2) test the voltage on Ignition 0 (terminal 18) verses the voltage on Ignition 1 (terminal 19). Obviously without testing for voltage we know that it is different because the P1634 is set. >>>>>>>>>Test the voltage at the fuses at IGN 0 (ENG) and PCM (IGN) and report back <<<<<<<< Once you tell us the voltages we will know more. (my guess is.... that you will find the same voltage at the fuses, but lets see) I have read elsewhere that P1634 is like a 'safe mode' of the PCM Rock's advice of replacing the fuse is good but test voltages at the fuses first. You can use your volt meter when the engine is running to test the voltage (put the voltmeter on the lowest scale that covers 12 volts) by touching the contact points on the fuse. Report back what you find in voltage when the engine is running.. I would do these tests BEFORE messing with intake gaskets and cracked or leaking intakes, P codes MUST be eliminated first.
  19. 1 point
    BodybyFisher

    TPS and ICM Question

    P1634 CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION The PCM is powered with 5 power feeds. Two of these feeds are from the battery, the other three are from the ignition switch and are called Ignition 1, Ignition Supplement and Ignition 0. Ignition 1 and Ignition Supplement are powered any time the key is in the CRANK, RUN or ACC positions. Ignition 0 is powered in ALL key positions except LOCK and CRANK. This diagnostic test is used to monitor the voltages received by the PCM at connector C1 terminals 18 and 19. When the engine is running, the PCM will compare the Ignition 1 voltage it receives at connector C1 terminal 19 to the Ignition 0 voltage it receives at connector C1 terminal 18. If the Ignition 1 and Ignition 0 voltages are more than 2 volts different for 5 seconds, DTC P1634 will set. CONDITIONS FOR RUNNING THE DTC Engine running CONDITIONS FOR SETTING THE DTC Voltage difference between Ignition 1 (PCM C1-19) and Ignition 0 (PCM C1-18) inputs greater than 2 volts for 5 seconds. ACTION TAKEN WHEN THE DTC SETS The PCM will illuminate the Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) when the diagnostic runs and fails. The PCM will record operating conditions at the time the diagnostic fails. This information will be stored in the Freeze Frame and Failure Records. CONDITIONS FOR CLEARING THE MIL/DTC The PCM will turn the MIL OFF after three consecutive drive trips that the diagnostic runs and does not fail. A Last Test Failed (current) DTC will clear when the diagnostic runs and does not fail. A History DTC will clear after forty consecutive warm-up cycles with no failures of any emission retated diagnostic test. PCM battery voltage is interrupted. Using a Scan tool. DIAGNOSTIC AIDS If this DTC is intermittent check terminal contact at the PCM and the condition of the CKT 639 splice for an intermittent open condition. A short to unswitched battery voltage on the Ignition 11 Ignition Supplement circuit will set this DTC. Symptoms associated with this condition include the inability to shut the engine OFF using the ignition switch. If the Ignition 0 to the PCM is lost the vehicle will still run but some outputs may not function, if the Ignition 1 voltage is lost or goes below 5.5 volts the vehicle will not run but DTC P1634 should set. ******************* I am doing more research, will come back today
  20. 1 point
  21. 1 point
    Replace all 3 transmission lines. Hope for the best. SOmetimes the damage is already done but there is a good chance that it will be ok. as long as it was not revved too much while low on fluid
  22. 1 point
    rockfangd

    TPS and ICM Question

    The RS 0061 is the left rear height position sensor. IIRC. I also think if you had intake leaks on both sides you would for sure have lean codes. So I am skeptical there. If the intake was cracked it may vary the leak as it may open as the engine gets warmed up. Let me do some more research on that 1634 code. I would not have them touch anything unless you know for sure that they have a proper diagnosis. Otherwise it is just wasting money and opening up more can of worms. Do you have a multimeter? Need to find the pinouts that pertain to that and verify if it is a wire or a pcm issue. Ok so just off the top. Pin 19(PINK) at PCM goes to the underhood fuse panel. 10 amp fuse. labeled ign 1. Start easy. 1. Replace the fuse. Dont care if it is blown or not. Check and report condition of pins. 2. If there is any corrosion that box needs to be pulled and closely inspected. 3. Disconnect battery. Pull fuse, ohm the pink wire from the fuse to the pcm plug pin 19. Report 4. For a good reference touch the 2 leads together on the multimeter and that number would be your 0. If you are not comfortable with this then you need to have someone experienced do this
  23. 1 point
    Glad to hear you finally received it. Let us know how we can help. PS, love the shop you are in, very bright, I need a shop like that!
  24. 1 point
    rockfangd

    Northstar slow coolant leak.

    welcome to the forum. What a great forum it is. If the coolant is coming from the area of the waterpump it is likely caused from the o-ring that seals it in the housing, or the pump itself. If it is a crossover leak I would suggest popping a few crushed up bars leak tabs into the lower radiator hose and run it for awhile and see if it goes away.
  25. 1 point
    Just did a 99 deville in my driveway without dropping the engine with timeserts-can be done but I will not do it again-car runs great and no issues and have put about 3000 Miles on since-have a 99 eldo to do also and will definitely drop engine this time-bought both of these cars for 300$ a piece because people are afraid to work on them-may buy more if I find ones as nice as these-don’t be afraid and take your time-it’s a learning experience!