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  1. Jan Olsson

    BBF we miss you.

    I miss BBF's posts. All that committed energy and all that knowledge. I'm sure that I'm not alone!
    5 points
  2. Our lovely German host Sarah Sauer takes the 2015 Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid for a spin. The Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid is powered by a 3.0 liter V6 engine making 333 horsepower and than there's an electric-motor that makes 95 horsepower with a total output of 416 horsepower. Together with an 8-speed automatic transmission 0 to 60 mph will come in 5.2 seconds with a top speed of 167 mph. But is it worth the $99,000 price tag? Let's find out! With camera men Jan Gleitsmann and Jens Stratmann of Ausfahrt.tv!
    4 points
  3. Hi! I just wanted to re-introduce myself since it was a long time ago. I'm a male, 46 years old, with wife and a daughter, nine years old. I don't really consider myself to be one of the lucky guys in the world but I'm not a very social kind of person and that goes hand in hand. I have been unemployed the latest two recessions for a couple of years (in Sweden it is the last guy employed who is the first guy who gets sacked when a company needs to shrink their employee force) and have moved around quite a bit (in Sweden) just to keep myself occupied. You know the kind, the guy with few personal connections who has to take the job no one else in their right minds will take. Some organization theorists believe that there are three kinds of people, the guy who just tags along, the guy who likes to be in charge and me, the guy who likes to be the specialist. I'm working as a mechanical engineer (currently on a company producing labels and my department is manufacturing labeling machines with me as the head engineer). I develop all new equipment even if the whole department take credit from my achievements, especially if they weren’t involved in the process at all, like sales people, my boss etc. My wife is a nurse specialized in cancer treatment (half boss too). Anyway we had to commute so the time to do fun things like working on cars, write on forums etc. was limited. We live in a small town because we really don't want to live in a violent and criminal town like Malmoe (where I am working). The Covid-19 outbreak forced me to work from home which by the way suits me just fine since I can't stand half of the people on my department (not to mention being in Malmoe) I've been working as a mechanical engineer in almost 25 years and have NEVER been surrounded by so many freeloaders. I swear that if the management kicked half of the employees we couldn't tell the difference! As an example we had an inventory of the stock the other day, on guy was "sick", a girl aged about 25 complained about that she was not supposed to be there because it wasn't her job, and also complained about her nails being damaged from counting O-rings and washers. I told her to shut up and count how many spring turns there are on the spring and work instead of complaining. 😉 I've been on the Caddy info forum since 2002 and have owned an Eldorado (1988 year model with about 150k miles on in when sold, 50 k miles from my driving) a 1993 STS (with about 150 k on it when sold, 50 k miles from my driving) a 2002 STS (about 210 k miles on in when sold, 190 k from my driving) and am the happy owner of a 2012 CTS-V. The V currently has about 100 k on the odometer (70 k miles from me). Our family (daughter, wife and me) also like Jeeps. We have owned a 1990 Cherokee, a 2004 Wrangler and the latest one was bought last year. A 1999 Grand Cherokee. Of course people think that we are insane when we buy a 20 year old car with almost 200k on the odometer but I saw it as a recreational project. I always try to do as much as possible by myself when I work on our cars. No need to pay someone to damage or mistreat the car, I can do a better work for free. I only have access to a very small garage. Just enough space to change oil, brake pads and other small stuff. On the Jeep I've replaced all cooler lines and hoses, alternator, AC-compressor, radiators, brake pads and discs, brake booster, rear exhaust system, fan coupling, some sensors and electrical motors too. Payed the local shop to do the brake lines and rusted out door sills and some other small stuff. Now we have a 4wd in “daily drive condition” and a car that we use in terrain and all year around costing $0 in financing. Just got to fix the leaking valve gaskets and some minor stuff. We used it on a 3000 mile drive this vacation without the slightest problem. Now I thought it was the time to buy an older car. I bought a 1949 Chevrolet Fleetline in "daily driver" condition and I am planning to keep it in OEM condition. Unfortunately it is hard to get access to garages in Sweden and I'm searching for a garage to store it and work on it. I have the car stored by the seller at the moment and can go there to do minor work on the car but it is always better to have the car in the near vicinity than 30 miles away. I think it is in need of only smaller work. Adjusting valves, ignition and carburetor, get the clock and speedometer to work and other small stuff like that. Great car, but it is not a Cadillac. I figured that I already have a performance driver so it will be fun driving a Chevrolet anyway The car has an inline overhead valve six with about 90 bhp, three on a tree (first gear unsynchronized), no oil filter (option in the day) and an AM-radio, 6 Volt electrical system and vacuum wipers, no servo steering or servo brakes but it is solid running, no mechanical noises and reasonable rust free. I just love it
    3 points
  4. Classic Roadsters Duke Jaguar SS-100 Replica, Epilogue. I don't know if anyone sees or is following this part of the forum any more, but I thought I would post a final report of my Jaguar ownership experience after reviewing my original thread. On May 22, 2019, I helped load my Jaguar onto a transport trailer to be shipped to its new owner in Phoenix. After six years of ownership that featured lots of fun driving, a few breakdowns, quite a bit of maintenance education and work, we decided we had satisfied our Brit roadster yen and wanted the garage space back. A Craigslist ad brought me a willing buyer with cash. As an investment, the Jaguar was a loser, but considering the money we put into it overall, probably equivalent to the depreciation on any vehicle. I documented most of the work that was done to make the Jag a reliable and attractive car in my first thread. At the end, it was in fact very reliable. The last recurring problems turned out to be fuel system issues that were working together to be hard to diagnose--carburetor and fuel pump. The rebuilt carb I installed was not internally calibrated quite right, including wrong jets, so a professional rebuild of the rebuilt solved one part of the equation. But it was still stalling. That turned out to be due to bad fuel pumps. The Duke was built with a non-stock electric fuel pump mounted just below the tank. The original and first replacement pumps were overheating and cutting out. My mechanic finally installed a racing-duty pump which totally solved the stalling problem. Like folks say about boats, it was a happy day when we bought the Jaguar, and a happy day when we sold it. No regrets. Loved the experience and even learning from the problems. And over 4,000 miles of joyriding. And so we move on. I hope folks who own, or think about owning or have interest in replica cars, and the Duke model particularly, find something of interest or encouragement in what I have shared. And to whoever owns our Jaguar now, and wherever they may be, happy driving!
    3 points
  5. Jsblkram

    Jsblkram

    Fantastic !!!!!!! Replaced alternator with the AC Delco from RockAuto. Battery is charging just fine. Took some time but with the help from u guys it is now back on the road. Many, many thanks for the info to help me figure this out. Thank u !!!!!!!!
    3 points
  6. Lance, More than likely the cylinder walls and the rings are a little rusty. Is it on an engine stand? Does it move slightly or is it locked solid? Pull the spark-plugs if there were any installed, or the plastic caps and with an oil squirt can, squirt about a spoon full of engine oil in each cylinder and let it sit for about an hour. Try turning/rocking the crankshaft, if it won't move let it sit overnight and try again. If still no movement rotate the engine assembly so that one bank of cylinders is vertical, let it sit for an hour or so and then turn the engine so the other bank is vertical. Rinse & Repeat as needed. Once it starts moving, simply keep working it back and forth until you start getting complete revolutions, then you can go in the direction of normal rotation, CW if IRC
    3 points
  7. Well I have to say I really enjoy this site and hope it does not hook up with any other Caddy sites I have gotten lots of good info from my 1993 DEVILLE and I actually have a service light on with a code I need to address when I get some more time. I especially enjoy the respect given here along with good solid INFO thanks Bruce for a great place foe Caddy owners
    3 points
  8. To some degree I would concur, at least on the heavier viscosities. But not a 10w30? Quiz question: what is the kinematic viscosity at 100c (read that as the operating temperature of the engine) of a 5w30 vs a 10w30? Answer: The same! At operating temperature, 0w30, 5w30, and 10w30 all have the same kinematic viscosity of around 10.5 to 10.9. The only difference between them is the winter cold flow rating, which is what the "w' stands for. And that has more to do with cold starting than running the engine. The "w" is not a oil weight rating but a cold flow rating. Go to the SAE website and they will confirm this. And even then, unless one is dealing with some serious nasty cold at start up, it is not really an issue. Michigan gets cold, but not real nasty cold except in the U.P. (yes, I travel Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, etc frequently year round). A 10w30 full synthetic generally will have a -40F to -45F cold flow pour point along with a rated cold crank start rating of -25F to -30F. So unless one is in Calgary, MT, ND, or Fairbanks, AK type of weather, a 10w30 will be fine. For those like me, that the car resides in a heated garage when not in use, a 10w30 will work just fine year round. It rarely gets below -20F in my area in Central Iowa. I lived outside of Fairbanks, AK for 10 years and used 10w30 conventional with no problems. But then, we were smart up there... we had block heaters, oil pan heaters, and electric battery blankets that all got plugged in when the vehicles were at home. That all being said, everything from my Yamaha portable generator on up thru my class 8 commercial trucks all get 10w30 oil. Different types, but still 10w30. My 2015 2500HD, my 2006 CTS, my JD zero turn mower, my JD 825i Gator, my ag tractor, my 2013 Freightliner semi trucks. 10w30 has a lower volatility rating (NOACK vaporization rate) than either 0w30 or 5w30, it also uses less viscosity improvers which can shear under extreme pressure, and it maintains a more level viscosity rating over the entire oil change interval. Many full synthetic 10w30 oils are actually straight 30w oils, but qualify due to their cold flow rating as 10w30. I have long since become very fond of 10w30 oils for all these reasons. And most full synthetic 10w30 oil will meet GM 4718M and 6094M specs, which are the basis of what dexos1 is built upon. The dexos1 spec just specifies a 5w30 minimum to cover all the bases of what most folks deal with in N. America. In some ways, it is not even as good at ILSAC GF-5 rating, which has a better ethanol emulsification spec than dexos1. Which seems strange, since GM is all over the idea of using ethanol.
    3 points
  9. I am pleased to announce that I, ME, MY, have something to contribute, besides a question.... I went to the local Cadillac dealership (Vic Alfonso- Portland, Or.) that originally sold my baby in 2002 and while ordering some touch-up paint (just in case), I asked the counterman, Gary, if it was possible to have a print out of the original invoice, or what ever they called it, for my records. "Sure, all I need is the VIN number." Gary replied. "DONE!" I responded....and 5 minutes later I left the lot with the read-out. Of course, this might have happened for a couple of reasons, not the least of which was my disarming charm, or my gorgeous wife batting her baby blues, or the fact that it originally was sold on that lot...never-the-less, I've answered my own question. Hope this helps others who would like a copy of their ride for their files.
    3 points
  10. Logan

    2007 DTS

    From the GM DVD manual...2007 DTS... A drain trough encircles the sliding window panel and leads to the drain hoses. The drain hoses are located at each corner of the sunroof module assembly. The two front drain hoses route down the windshield pillars. The two rear drain hoses route down the rear sail and the quarter panels. If you encounter a wet headliner or other water leak, inspect the following areas for the source of the leak: • The windshield • The rear window Verify that the drainage system is not plugged or restricted. Use the following procedure: Using a one pint container, pour water into the drain trough with the sunroof window open. Inspect for water drainage through the drain hoses exiting the wheel house areas. If the water flow is restricted, use a low volume of compressed air in order to clear the drain system. Do not blow the drain hose away from the housing drain spout. Retest the system. If water drips from the headliner above the door, lower the headliner as required in order to inspect for a proper drain tube connection. If necessary, install new tie wraps onto the drain spouts of the sunroof module assembly.
    3 points
  11. First I'd like to thank everybody on this board for the help I received with this problem. I ended up replacing the complete fuel line from tank to engine compartment metal tubing. I also dropped in an AC Delco fuel pump. Car started to run like a champ so I took it out for a test drive. I made it about 15 to 25 yards and the engine died. Checked the fuel pump and I could not hear it running. So I had a friend drive and slowly poured fuel into the carburetor to get it back into the yard. Dropped the tank again and found the new AC Delco pump was bound up. Like a dummy I didn't put a sock on the pickup tube. This forced me to stick my hand down in the tank and see if there was anything in their. To my surprise I found a bunch of rubber particles and black rubber dust in the tank. Then I remembered the first pump I took out had the blackest sock I had ever seen on the fuel pump. So now it's down to taking the tank off and send it out for an acid bath or just buy a new tank. I opted for buying the new tank and be done with it. So what was happening, while driving the fuel was mixing with this rubber type dust and making its way to the throttle body. Bad fuel, bad performance. I'm chalking this one up to experience and thank everybody again for the help.
    3 points
  12. I watched the video a few times and it looks like the freeze out plug in the head is leaking, is that correct? Here are a few close ups. You will notice on one head the cam pulley is removed and in the other head there is no intake cam for locational perspective.
    3 points
  13. Göran W

    I need help.......

    Ok. Like this?
    3 points
  14. Link; https://plus.google.com/113969460069344266731/posts/i4WipmeZqrf
    3 points
  15. mjkubba

    STS

    As I promised first patch of my Cadillacs photos: More to come...
    3 points
  16. I'm pretty much talking about the body, paint and interior. Although a lot of the mechanical parts are too. Even the shocks and struts.. They do need changing though.. It took me 10 years to do it, but this is my 400th post!! WOO HOO!!
    3 points
  17. Problem: Parking brake does not release automatically Car in question: Seville 1998 – 2004 Symptom: Parking brake applied. Engine running, transmission lever set in gear. Parking brake does not release by itself, but when parking brake pedal is pushed slightly further and then released, parking brake will release. How the mechanism works: The parking brake pedal is held down by friction of a spring wound around a cylinder. This cylinder has a toothed wheel on top of it, which engages with a toothed wheel segment connected to the parking brake pedal. If one applies the parking brake, the pedal moves and turns the cylinder against the windings of the spring which gives no friction thus no locking force. Once the pedal is no longer pushed (you take your foot away) it tries to return. The cylinder tries to spin in the opposite direction with the windings of the spring, resulting in pulling down the spring and thus locking the cylinder, the pedal is held in position. When the solenoid engages to release the parking brake (or the emergency release lever is used), the windings of the spring are pushed open. The cylinder is set free, rotetes and the pedal returns to the normal position. Reason for malfunction: The springs sticks to the cylinder, even when the tension is released. A little metal lever inside the mechanism is slightly out of shape. Remedy: Remove complete parking brake mechanism. To do this, separate the front section of the parking brake cable under the car, below the drivers seat, near the sill. Unhook parking brake cable from plastic brackets (two). Remove sound insulation panel (two screws) and knee bolster (pull down after sound insulation panel is removed). Remove sill molding (pull up carefully). Remove footrest, start with the black plastic insert (pry with a screwdriver from the top), then undo two screws. Undo three 13mm nuts holding the parking brake mechanism to the body. Pry back carpet, remove rubber grommet where parking brake cable enters the body. Move parking brake mechanism downwards until you can reach the electrical connector on top of the solenoid, seperate the connector. From under the car, depress the springs where the parking brake cable enters the body, push cable in and remove complete parking brake assembly including cable. Study mechanism, look from the pedal side into the apparatus. Locate little tin lever which operates spring (second pic). Check how much slack is evident when you operate the emergency lever. Carefully bend lever with a screwdriver or similar tool until free play is nearly gone. Test release operation by applying the pedal and using emergency release lever. Can pedal be moved back easily? See linked pictures: Put everything back together in reverse order. Time needed: 2 hours (relaxed working) Tools needed: Set of screwdrivers Pliers 1/2“ ratchet set 1/4“ ratchet set Shop lamp Some patience Hoist helpful, but not mandatory. Parking brake cable can be worked on lying on the ground by the drivers side of the car. Please bear in mind that I'm no native english speaker, in case there are spelling mistakes.
    3 points
  18. Hi Bruce and others I notice your in Plano, Tx I just moved from Oregon to Greenville, Tx which is just east of you I used to work for GM at the Tech center in Warren, Mi back in mid 1980s to early 1990s Frankly you need to find a better dealer or shop as their diagnostics game plan is lacking So just doing some thinking 1. PCM uses a 5 volt ref to several engin sensors such as CAM, Crank, TPS, APP, MAF, AIR, etc. So if the fuse for 5 volt (of PCM) or the PCM itself was faulty there would be a lot more problems and DTCs tripped so to me that leaves it is not a PCM issue 2. You did not mention if the engine goes into limp mode, if it does I would go right to diag APP (gas pedal and TPS) as 2 of your DTCs are drive by wire issues. Depending on model year APP consists of 2 or 3 pots, the TAC (DBW controller) is doing multi checks to assure APP is not faulty and would cause a run away vehicle and cause a crash. Simply with a good OBD-II scanner (as I show below ) even with just key on, engine off APP and TPS can be seen if APP and TPS agree or not. 3. Also, can use the scanner to see if 5 volt ref is functional 4. Should be checking for TSBs for that vehicle as many times the problems are weak crimps of wiring pins or the wiring loom has no slack such as to APP and causes stress to wiring pins connections As example : SUBJECT:Service Update for Inventory and Customer Vehicles Main Engine Harness Wire Chafe Expires with Base Warranty MODELS:2016 Cadillac ATS-V This service update includes vehicles in dealer inventory and customer vehicles that return to the dealership for any reason. This bulletin will expire at the end of the involved vehicle's New Vehicle Limited Warranty period. PURPOSE This bulletin provides a service procedure to inspect and, if necessary, reposition the main engine-wiring harness on certain2016 model year Cadillac ATS-V vehicles. In some of these vehicles, the orientation of the main-engine wiring harness could cause the wires to contact and chafe against the right-front valve cover bolt and washer. If the engine-wiring harness insulation is compromised, the vehicle’s tachometer, powertrain, and automatic-braking systems could be effected. While this condition could—if uncorrected—cause a loss of propulsion or the activation of the automatic braking system, GM has no reports indicating that either event has occurred on a vehicle in the field. This service procedure should be completed as soon as possible on involved vehicles currently in dealer inventory and customer vehicles that return to the dealer for any type of service during the New Vehicle Limited Warranty coverage period. So check for other TSBs such as VEHICLES INVOLVED 16 ATS-V TSBS Check for how the DTCs are defined will help zoom into the areas to look at first such as : Symptoms of a P2135 code can range from stalling when you come to a stop, total lack of power, no acceleration, sudden loss of power at cruise speeds or stuck throttle at current rpm. Additionally, the check engine light will illuminate and the code will be set. Potential Causes of P2135 DTC It's been my experience that the wiring connector or "pig tail" on the throttle body gives problems in the form of a poor connection.The female terminals on the pigtail corrode or pull out of the connector. Possible bare wire on pigtail shorting to ground. The top cover on the throttle body distorted preventing the gears from turning properly. The electronic throttle body is faulty. The accelerator pedal sensor or its wiring failed. The engine management computer has failed. The TPS sensors were not correlating for a few seconds and the computer needs to be cycled through its relearn phase to restore active response to the throttle body, or the computer needs reprogramming at the dealer. Diagnostic / Repair Steps A few points about the electronically controlled throttle. This system is incredibly sensitive and vulnerable to damage, more than any other system. Handle it and its components with extreme care. One drop or rough handling and it's history. Apart from the accelerator pedal sensor, the remainder of the components is in the throttle body. On inspection, you will notice a flat plastic cover on the top of the throttle body. This houses the gears to actuate the throttle plate. The motor has a small metal gear protruding up through the housing under the cover. It drives a large "plastic" gear attached to the throttle plate. The pin that centers and supports the gear fits into the throttle body housing and the top pin fits into the "thin" plastic cover. If the cover is distorted in any way, the gear will be compromised requiring total replacement of the throttle body. Pull the electrical connector out of the throttle body. Inspect it closely for missing or bent female terminals. Look for corrosion. Clean any corrosion using a small pocket screwdriver. Place a small amount of electrical grease on the terminals and reconnect it. If the terminal connector has bent or missing pins you can pick up a new "pigtail" at most auto parts stores or from the dealer. Inspect the top cover on the throttle body for cracks or warping. If any are present, call the dealer and ask if they sell just the top cover. If not, replace the throttle body. With a voltmeter, probe the accelerator pedal sensor. It will have 5 volts for reference and next to it a varying signal. Turn the key on and slowly depress the pedal. The voltage should climb from .5 to 5.0 smoothly. Replace it if the voltage spikes or it has no voltage at the signal wire. Look online for wire terminal identification on the throttle body of your vehicle. Probe the throttle body connector for power to the throttle motor. Have a helper turn the key on and slightly depress the pedal. If no power is present, the computer is at fault. If there is power the throttle body is malfunctioning. -------------------------------------- If problem is resolved, problems still might happen but it could be now that APP and TPS are NOT rezoned to PCM Some GM makes to rezone TPS as to angle of TB butterfly is with key on, engine off, disconnect the wiring connector of TPS PCM will trip a TPS DTC and set TPS angle at zero angle, go key off, plug TPS connector back in, turn key back on and PCM will rezone TPS angle to zero, Clear any DTCs JR _ Team ZR-1 Corvette Racing - Custom GM PCM and TCM Tuning
    2 points
  19. @BodybyFisher got the new alternator, pulled the old one out and there was something rattling around int it. Was able to get some of it out it was very brittle plastic. also there was a bracket that is used to tension the belt for the alternator that was turned and wasn't putting tension on the belt. I got everything back together and it is running great, checked the battery and alternator volts with my dvom and it is charging at 14.6. so I think I got her going. thanks for your replies @BodybyFisher if you see anybody having a similar problem send them my way. and I can add pictures of the tensioner.
    2 points
  20. For a halo car, sales were surprisingly strong. Cars were in dealerships by the spring of 1930, and in the first two months of sale the V-16 cars accounted for some 20 percent of Cadillac's sales, far more than GM expected. But the Great Depression was taking hold, and the introduction of the 135-hp V-12 engine in 1931, fitted to a smaller chassis, impacted V-16 sales. Cadillac sold 2,887 V-16 cars for 1930, but only 750 in 1931, more than half of which were leftover 1930s—only 364 V-16s were produced in 1931. Read more: https://www.automobilemag.com/news/cadillac-v-16-engine-history-photos-specifications/
    2 points
  21. Terrance, I'm not sure if it is still working - I sold the '96 SLS in the Fall of 2010. Hopefully it's still working. Further experimentation on a '97 STS showed a 4700 ohm resistor did the trick but that was an STS, not an STS and the systems are different. The '97 STS went to the junkyard in early 2017 (at 225,000 miles on the clock) due to a cracked water jacket on the engine block. My current fleet is a '05 and '04 Deville plus the '93 Fleetwood Brougham that I have owned since it had 15 miles on the odometer. The Fleetwood Brougham has always been reliable as are the Devilles - probably one of the reasons I've been absent from this discussion board for awhile.
    2 points
  22. @rockfangd watch this video on voltage drop, this is where I would start.
    2 points
  23. Logan

    95 Deville - AC ISSUES

    Sudden no AC? Could be a bad compressor clutch coil. The pull in coil can sometimes fail and there will be no way to pull the clutch in. Or....sometimes the air gap wears into excessive gap....and the coil can't pull the clutch in....or it only happens when the engine parts are hot and expand. Both the AC coil and clutch plate can be swapped with the compressor in the car. No need to pull out the Freon. Most AC shops will simply recommend a complete new AC compressor assembly. They make more money that way. The actual style of the assemblies varies based on what brand of compressor etc you have....but the principal is the same. The brand can vary depending on year and engine etc. Some cars may have 2-3 different brands of compressors used on the same engine and year. I had one go out recently on a non-GM product...of course it happened on the hottest day....taking daughter to airport in rush hour....just as we were getting on highway.. Typically around $50 in parts.
    2 points
  24. check the main ground near the starter, make sure clean and tight along with battery connections.
    2 points
  25. Check the basic stuff first , fuel pressure There is a ground under the air filter housing on the drivers frame rail . It was there in 1998 and early 1999. It’s held in by a 10mm bolt .. the bolt is rusted on the bottom side and will break . I relocate it the ground on the bottom stud of the expansion tank . This will cause issues with phantom no starts or stall.
    2 points
  26. Service Manager at the dealership forwarded me this email today: He says the warranty on the repairs has now been bumped up from the regular 12 months to 24 months (36,000 miles). I should get a packet in the mail soon. GM rep called me back and apologized, she didn't realize that the extended warranty trumped he offer of OnStar (apparently they are not allowed to do both), so her request for free OnStar was declined. Oh well, I'd rather have the warranty and call the tow truck myself anyway. I guess when it all boils down, they really did try to make it right. Car is still running perfect.
    2 points
  27. I was going to ask if this was a direct injected engine the other day. Watch this video.
    2 points
  28. winterset

    My DeVille Got Hit

    Sorry this happened to your car. you might have to put your boxing mitts on to fight with the insurance company, but believe me when I tell you that paint technology, and color matching and blending has come a long way. Your initial check from the insurance will be a lowball figure. bringing it to the right restoration/ custom paint shop will help. The shop will dictate how to properly repair the vehicle. Google around to see a local shop that specializes in custom paint, and see how they can help. GOOD LUCK
    2 points
  29. I got maxed out on pic upload size, and I'm NOT paying photobuket a dime,,,,, Be sure to check the crank bearings, or simply plan on replacing them. I haven't taken one apart with "mileage" that didn't need new crank bearings. Cylinder Bore Taper - 0.100mm Max Cylinder Bore Out of round - 0.100mm Max Piston Clearance @ 41mm below Deck Face - 0.020-0.051mm
    2 points
  30. Trying to sort out the service manual......I think even the service manual guys got confused with the different ones...'left side (RHD)' for example. Kind of scrambled in with passenger and drivers side repair descriptions. The instructions seem to be incorrect on a couple of them. Update...I think the service manual may have a misprint.....anyway....I attached pics of each one GM ESI shows.
    2 points
  31. When Timeserts are used, the proper installation is to install the inserts in all 20 head bolt holes in the block. The Timesert kit comes with all the necessary tools to install the inserts. You will need to purchase the additional inserts - I think 10 are included in the kit. Regardless of the method you use, you're not going to have to remove the heads again - it's stronger then when it left the factory. Even if you did have to remove a head for some reason, the head bolt would spin in the insert - the inserts are swaged and Loctited to the block.
    2 points
  32. I know this is a very old Thread, but I figured I could add this video for anyone still trying to remedy this issue
    2 points
  33. I'm not sure what the problem is with the original radio but here is a link to a short discussion about the 2008 CTS radio and one possible fix. It seems the best way to deal with this situation is to fix the radio.
    2 points
  34. Jan Olsson

    20W-50 Oil

    I would feel comfortable with a 15W-40 oil in a Northstar engine since the Guru once told me it wouldn't harm anything if I found it hard to find a 10W-30 to my 1993 STS. (I would on the other hand not gain anything). If you look closer in your user manual they also mention other viscosities for other cases/temperatures but 5W-30 or 10W-30 is the best all-round solution. Cadillac specifically states "do not use heavy weight oils such as 20W-50". Next time I change oil I'll switch to 15W-40 because my baby has developed an oil addiction too. I understand what you are saying MAC, after almost 300k the car has probably greater play between many bearing surfaces and thus can handle a heavy weight oil. But there will probably be bearings with larger play and there will be bearings which still have factory specs in your engine and the possibility is that they will suffer from oil starvation on cold starts. If 15W-40 won't harm a "normal" Northstar then I would stick with that to be on the safe side. If the oil burning comes from stuck rings, leaking valve guides or the crankcase ventilation the heavier oil will probably cure the symptoms but the rest of the engine may suffer. Just my two cents.
    2 points
  35. MMMmmm....hang on.....pretty sure it was GM that had the huge fire in 1953. http://www.autotran.us/TheGreatHydraMaticFire.html There are one or two current transmissions that GM and Ford developed together for cost savings. Would have to go look it up.
    2 points
  36. @SAMUEL reports that on investigation he found that one of the fuse sockets in the trunk was not grounded properly.
    2 points
  37. patients are a virtue I just enjoy the site and respect the help
    2 points
  38. Hmmmm, I think I heard that somewhere before.......... Head - Bolts - Expansion - Contraction ...... Thanks BBF for bringing the point to life
    2 points
  39. Thank you for the words, I believe you are a true technician and I mean that as a sincere compliment. A little history first: I started working at a Cadillac only dealership in '84 fresh out of tech school as a "test driver", my job was to test drive the vehicles to make sure the vehicle was fixed before it was returned to the customer. I hated the job, it was boring. I made it known to the service manager that I wanted to be a line tech. After a few months I was offered a position on the line as an A/C & "heavy line" tech, of course I took it. The 4.1 had just come out but we were busy with the 350 conversion diesel doing head gaskets and injection pumps. This was a very busy dealership and time management was a critical issue as "dispatch" would have repair orders stacked up and if you were asked to help you would. I had a rack and 2 flat stalls and they were almost always full, sometimes stacked one behind the other. So the "time is money" issue plays a big role, but I never put quantity above quality. Having the "test driver" bring a vehicle back to me was NOT going to happen. I do think shops that specialize in certain repairs can be more successful. As an example; If I had all the parts to replace the engine in an '85 Deville at 8am, I would have the new engine running by 2pm, and back to the customer at 5pm, including test drive. That kind of speed is from repetition, I did hundreds of them. That kind of repetition is nearly impossible to do in an independent repair shop. My number 1 priority ( or goal if you will ) on every engine job was to make it look like the engine had just rolled off the assembly line, all the way down to the wire loom retainers locked and secured in the brackets. That engine swap pays 12 or 13 hrs factory time so yes it is possible to do the job, do it right and still make money. If I was doing a Hyundai engine swap I would get my @## kicked on flat rate on the first one, break even on the second one and make money on the third one. There also would not be any of the problems you experienced.That same goal carried over to all the jobs, brakes, rear axle overhauls etc Troubleshooting was one of my favorite jobs, i loved the A/C and electrical diagnostics. Later I worked drivability and electrical but that was another dealership. I have the diagnostic flow chart ingrained into memory and I'm pretty sure it is still stuck to the side of my tool box. It is a methodology that works. The Cadillac dealership was a factory repair facility which meant the factory would bring vehicles there that other dealerships could not repair, they were assigned on a random basis depending on the problem. I have a few TSB's that were mine. Foremost was '86 - '87 E & K dash lights flicker ( I think that was the years, I've slept since then ) took me 4 days to find it was a faulty trunk pull down diode. it took me another full day to put the car back together. I got 6hrs flat rate for that including "other hours" authorized by the factory rep, but the point is, I still felt I had won I even did a time study for Cadillac on an oil filter adapter seal replace that prompted them to lower the factory repair time on it, I was not very popular for a while. The service manager asked me to NOT do any more time studies. There were a lot of good techs working at that dealership and there probably still is. I was there for 11 years, worked at other Cadillac/GM dealerships then started writing service for a few years. Eventually I was service manager for a Cadillac/GM dealership but high blood pressure forced me into a career change in 2002. There are good technicians working at independent repair shops too and I take my hat off to them. To be able to do quality work on a myriad of different vehicle types is truly an art form. i have worked in an independent facility but only for about a year, it's a different world. Training is a big issue, ( a thorough understanding of the basics is an absolute must ) along with the reluctance by some to use the proper tools for the job even when the tools are readily available. BUT by far the BIGGEST problem is, and you stated it yourself - ATTENTION TO DETAIL - without it, you end up with nothing more than a hack-job. Pride in your work shows in the final product that you deliver back to the customer. I'd love to do a NorthStar case half reseal with you and you could show me how to do the Time-Serts. So, what do you think? We could make a fortune! You would not believe the things the factory tried on the 4.1 & 4.5 to try and salvage the engine in an attempt to avoid the engine swap under warranty, we all know how that turned out.... My introduction to the NorthStar was with the Allante. I think i did the first case half reseal but I have no proof of that, I did the first one for that dealership though. I bet I can still beat flat rate on it, on any platform :) A saying that has stuck with me and I don't even remember where I heard it. THERE IS ALWAYS TIME TO DO THE JOB RIGHT - THERE IS NEVER ENOUGH TIME TO DO THE JOB AGAIN !!! I hope I answered your questions and didn't ramble on too much. John
    2 points
  40. MAC

    Donald Trump!

    Need I say more? I notice very rarely is there political discussion at Caddyinfo. We all know politics is a divisive topic and no doubt we tend to shy away from political discussion in order to keep the peace. However, I have to chime in about Trump. He is a breath of fresh air, as far as his candor and no nonsene approach. Many feel he will bow out, but I don't think so. Unless he falls way behind in the polls, he's in it to win it. People are fed up with the status quo politicians on both sides of the isle. As far as I'm concerned, if a community organizer can become president, then a multi-billionaire businessman can become president. I'm tired of being lied to by politicians. For the first time in my lifetime a candidate (Donald Trump) is not affraid to tell it like it is.
    2 points
  41. This is definitely a job requiring a Tech 2 to diagnose and/or correct. Unfortunately, you need a certified XLR tech at a dealership to work on it unless you have your own Tech 2 and a set of Service manuals. XLR Folding Top switches are fairly reliable, it's the potentiometers that determine moving component locations that aren't. The pots-potentiometers for my fellow geeks, (or position sensors) are responsible for 90% of the problems associated with the Folding Top. The position sensors (there are three) change their resistance when a component they're attached to moves. Each component has a retracted and extended position and corresponding resistance value (converted to counts by the Tech 2) depending on it's position. The Folding Top Control (FTC) module stores these values. Over time, it's very common for the values to drift as the sensors age, temperatures change, or they become loose -they're only held in place with one fastener. Once the expected (learned) sensor values don't match those stored in the FTC module, a Folding Top movement cycle (extend/retract) will stop. In many cases, when it stopped is an indicator of why it stopped. The Folding Top follows a pre-programmed sequence. When retracting, first, the windows lower. If they aren't indexed, (so they know where their lowered position is, the top will not move.) Nada. Zip. Nothing. If the windows are properly indexed, the front tonneau (three flaps behind the seats) raises, the rear deck lid raises, and the top retracts into the trunk. After that, the rear tonneau extends, and the rear deck lid lowers. To raise the roof, the opposite sequence occurs. Say for example, the folding top doesn't retract after the rear deck lid raises. (This assumes the hydraulic pump is good and the cantilever scissors mechanism that operates the rear deck lid is working properly too.) The front tonneau position sensor may be out of tolerance. Not enough to inhibit operation, but just enough to make the FTC module paranoid that it didn't raise, so it stops the cycle. It takes more time to contort one's body to connect the Tech 2 than it does to run a full diagnostic on the XLR. One of the diagnostic subroutines deals specifically with the Folding Top. It displays the component values (counts) the FTC expects, and shows the actual counts it reads during a movement cycle. By recording the stored values, it's easy to determine which sensor is out of tolerance when it doesn't match up. If they don't match, a Relearn is performed. This procedure records the sensor position counts and over-writes the prior values. In many cases, a Relearn will fix a sensor problem. If the sensor is going (or is) bad, it's just a temporary fix, and the sensor will require replacement. Again, a Relearn is required. This isn't meant to be a complete explanation of the Folding Top's operation, just a quick explanation of the most common problem most owners experience with it. 2004-2005 XLRs appear to be the most trouble-prone, and some changes (with retroactive mods) were made to the sensors in later years. But like anything else, as these vehicles age, they're going to need increasing amounts of TLC. CC
    2 points
  42. From Craig's List Zero Mile Cadillac Flathead V8 and Trans still in crate since November of 1944. Have the original shipping docs for it. The Stuart and Chaffee Tanks in WW2 took twin cad motors as well as some other applications. This particular motor was originally destined for England for the Oxford Carrier, a tracked vehicle developed in 1944 but was held up for testing by Dec. because of waiting on Cadillac to ship motors, like his one. Read more http://losangeles.craigslist.org/sfv/cto/5145842581.html
    2 points
  43. Hi all. thought I would share. I took My 97 Seville out of winter storage today. It has been parked since october. I checked the oil, unhooked the battery tender, fired it up, and off I went. This car still runs and drives like new. clearly the reason why I stick with this generation Cadillac. There is definate differences between the 97 Seville and my 01 Eldo. Which makes me wonder what else Cadillac changed after 2000. Examples The Seville has instant snap, the eldorado has the snap but it is not like the Seville. the engine is very throaty and begs for more on the Seville, the eldo is not as throaty and does not sound as good. I also like not having the air pump setup on the Seville. My eldo has horrible torque steer, The Seville does not. My Seville has RSS, the eldo does not. (wish it did) And to top it off my Seville does not have the nagging front end shimmy that I still cannot cure on my eldo. My Seville thrilled me today. To go from storage to driving it like I stole it and it begged for more. It felt great. I might add that my 96 Deville rode just as good as the 97 Seville and had over 200k miles. What else did Cadillac do away with after year 2000?
    2 points
  44. Speaking of conversions Read More: http://dallas.craigslist.org/dal/cto/4922967144.html
    2 points
  45. This part of CaddyInfo is for Cadillac specific Builds, Project cars, and Mods. To get your own subforum, please start a new topic with the title: "Project: " + the name of your project. I will then create a subforum for your project with that name, and move the topic into that subforum here. The advantage of a subforum just on your build as opposed to a single topic is you can have multiple threads -- one about wheels, one about engine, one about paint for example but all grouped about your project via that subforum. Let me know if you need assistance. Please note that "Leave it stock, don't change it" is considered off-topic in "Cadillac Builds and Project Cars"! This is the place for people to talk about mods, full builds, and projects.
    2 points
  46. Nice I won the heavily worn assembly manual auction http://www.ebay.com/itm/Duke-Assembly-Manual-Classic-Roadsters-1939-Jaguar-/201066915532?nma=true&si=rbDNjdAkJN2cj4edpd5bN1MkOIE%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557 So soon we will have more info on several build topics
    2 points
  47. Thank you Bruce; I'm proud to be a contributor whenever I'm able. Not currently a Cadillac owner. My search for a "reasonably priced" CTS Coupe continues.
    2 points
  48. If you like it now, wait until it has all eight cylinders at full compression! Be careful with those tailgaters. Some of them are police. I do find the handling much more effective at losing tailgaters than the engine because at this late date on the East Coast no one expects an old Cadillac to handle like that. I've found that I can easily lose a Lexus with a brisk right turn without my wife noticing anything. And, it's perfectly legal as well as being safe and prudent, so long as you can see what's around the curve before you enter it. If you use the engine they can catch you later by simply ignoring the speed limit indefinitely and I have found that anyone who will tailgate like that will ignore the speed limit. Another tactic is effective if you do see a police car; drive next to it and a little ahead or wherever you can safely place yourself to minimize the distance between the tailgater and the driver of the police car. The last resort is dialing #77; the police are really a good friend on the road if you need one. I had several people track my CTS-V for a bit while on the trip back and successfully ignored all of them, in no small part because I look the part of the fuddy-duddy feather-foot, and I saw one of them pulled over by the Bears. Those guys give the Bears something to do.
    2 points


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