Z15

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Z15 last won the day on January 22 2014

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About Z15

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    http://www.synthetic-oil.com

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    Male
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    Michigan

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  • Car Model and Year
    2009 CTS4
  • Engine
    3.6L V6 VVT (LY7)

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  1. My recommendations were based on the owners manual for the car and 5W-30 is what it calls for. At the time of the post no 10w-30 met GM4718M (superseded w/dexos1). only 0W-xx and 5W-xx do.
  2. Anytime there is odor from the AC, its mold and or mildew causing it and you have to disenfect it to rid of the odor. Mold can make you very sick.
  3. The accepted rate of oil consumption for engines used in the vehicles referenced is 0.946 liter (1 qt) in 3200 km (2000 mi). Important: This rate only applies to personal use vehicles, under warranty, that are driven in a non-aggressive manner and maintained in accordance with the appropriate maintenance schedule, with less than 58,000 km (36,000 mi), or driven at legal speeds in an unloaded (for trucks) condition. Important: This rate does not apply to vehicles that are driven in an aggressive manner, at high RPM, high speeds, or in a loaded condition (for trucks). Oil consumption for vehicles driven under these conditions will be more. Many factors can affect a customer's concern with oil consumption. Driving habits and vehicle maintenance vary from owner to owner. Thoroughly evaluate each case before deciding whether the vehicle in question has abnormal engine oil consumption. Gasket and External Leaks Inspect the oil pan and engine covers for leakage due to over-tightened, damaged, or out of place gaskets. Inspect oil lines and fittings for signs of leakage. Improper Reading of the Oil Level Indicator (Dipstick) Verify that the dipstick tube is fully seated in the block. When checking the oil level, make sure the dipstick is wiped clean before taking an oil level reading and fully depress the dipstick until the shoulder bottoms out on the dipstick tube. The dipstick should be the proper part number for the engine/vehicle that is being checked. Notice: Operating your vehicle with an oil level that is below the minimum level indicated on the engine oil dipstick can result in severe engine damage. Repairs resulting from operating an engine with insufficient oil are not covered under the terms of the New Vehicle Warranty. Important: Refer to Owner Manual in SI for checking and adding engine oil. Not Waiting Long Enough After Running Engine to Check Oil Level Some engines require more time than others for the oil to drain back into the crankcase. To assure a sufficient amount of oil has drained back to the crankcase, and an accurate reading can be obtained, the vehicle should be allowed to sit for at least 15 minutes, after the engine has been shut off, before taking an oil level reading. In order to ensure accurate results, the temperature of the oil should be close to the same temperature as the last time the oil level was checked. Important: This does not apply to 2006-2009 Corvette Z06 equipped with the 7.0L LS7 and the 2009 Corvette ZR-1 with the 6.2L LS9 engines (dry sump). Follow the instructions in the Owner Manual for checking the oil in this application. Improper Oil Fill After an Oil Change Following an oil change, verify that the proper amount and type of oil was put in the engine and that the oil level on the dipstick is not above the full mark or below the add marks. Refer to the Owner Manual or Service Manual for information on recommended oil quantity, viscosity, and quality. Aggressive Driving, High Speed or High RPM Driving Aggressive driving and/or continuous driving at high speeds/high RPMs will increase oil consumption. Because this may not always be an everyday occurrence, it is hard to determine exactly how much the oil economy will be affected. A higher rate of oil consumption is normal for vehicles equipped with manual transmissions that are driven aggressively. By "aggressive," we mean operation at high RPM (3,000 RPM to redline), with frequent use of engine braking (using the engine to slow the vehicle). Vehicles that are driven aggressively may consume engine oil at a rate of up to 0.946 L (1 quart) every 805 km (500 mi). This is normal for a vehicle that is driven aggressively. No repair is necessary. This characteristic does, however, require the owner to check the engine oil level at sufficiently frequent intervals, especially when driving aggressively, to assure the oil level remains within the recommended operating range. As the Owner’s Manual recommends, you should check the oil level every time you get fuel. Towing or Heavy Usage Towing a trailer will increase oil consumption and may cause oil consumption to fall below the normal accepted rate referenced in this bulletin for an unloaded vehicle in a personal use application. Large frontal area trailers will further increase the work required from the engine, especially at highway speeds, and thus increases the rate of oil consumption. Crankcase Ventilation System Verify that the positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) system is operating properly. Blockages, restrictions, or damage to the PCV system can result in increased oil use. Oil Dilution (Fuel and Water) On vehicles that are usually driven short distances, less than 8 km (5 mi), especially in colder weather, unburned fuel and condensation generated from cold engine operation may not get hot enough to evaporate out of the oil. When this occurs, the dipstick may indicate that the oil level is over-full. Subsequent driving on a trip of sufficient length to enable normal engine operating temperature for 30 minutes or more, in order to vaporize excess moisture and fuel, may give the customer the impression of excessive oil consumption. Engine Temperature If an engine is run at overheated temperatures (see Owner's Manual or Service Manual) for more than brief periods, oil will oxidize at a faster than normal rate. In addition, gaskets may distort, piston rings may stick, and excessive wear may result. Verify that all cooling system components are in proper working order. Engine Wear Piston scuffing, excessive piston-to-wall clearance, tapered or out of round cylinders, worn, damaged or improperly installed valve guides, seals and piston rings will all cause an increase in oil consumption.
  4. From GM info Nonetheles, its lower viscosity.
  5. Better cold shifting because Dexron VI spec calls for lower viscosity fluid. I don't know what could be causing the noise, never heard of that before. Make sure the fluid is at the proper level at normal operating temps and on a level surface. Normal operating temps are 180-200 degF. Many times anomalies can be traced to improper fluid levels, too much or not enough. Never add anything but ATF to the transmisson, never use gimmick additives. You say you pumped out the fluids, does that mean you did not change filters?
  6. Found this info recently; May 11, 2015 Dealerships may have difficulty locating the correct paint code for the following special edition vehicle models: 2003-2005 Deville – Mary Kay Edition 2003–2004 Seville – Mary Kay Edition 2004 XLR – Neiman Marcus Edition 2006–2011 DTS – Mary Kay Edition 2007–2011 STS – Mary Kay Edition 2009–2015 CTS, SRX – Mary Kay Edition 2013–2015 ATS, XTS – Mary Kay Edition When performing exterior body refinish/paint repairs on any of these vehicles, use the following paint codes: • 2003 Mary Kay Cadillac models – paint code WA-160E: Mary Kay Pink Pearl • 2004–2007 Mary Kay Cadillac models – paint code WA-983L: Mary Kay Pink Pearl III • 2004 Neiman Marcus Cadillac XLR – paint code WA-111B: Majestic Amethyst Metallic • 2008-2015 Mary Kay Cadillac models – paint code WA-590Q: Mary Kay Pink Pearl V
  7. oil consumption

    Subject: Information on Engine Oil Consumption Guidelines Models: 2009 and Prior GM Passenger Cars and Gasoline-Powered Light Duty Trucks Under 8500 LB GVW (Including Saturn) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This bulletin is being revised to update the warranty information on vehicles and add model years. Please discard Corporate Bulletin Number 01-06-01-011E (Section 06 -- Engine/Propulsion System). -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- All engines require oil to lubricate and protect the load bearing and internal moving parts from wear including cylinder walls, pistons and piston rings. When a piston moves down its cylinder, a thin film of oil is left on the cylinder wall. During the power stroke, part of this oil layer is consumed in the combustion process. As a result, varying rates of oil consumption are accepted as normal in all engines. Oil Consumption The accepted rate of oil consumption for engines used in the vehicles referenced is 0.946 liter (1 qt) in 3200 km (2000 mi). Important: This rate only applies to personal use vehicles, under warranty, that are driven in a non-aggressive manner and maintained in accordance with the appropriate maintenance schedule, with less than 58,000 km (36,000 mi), or driven at legal speeds in an unloaded (for trucks) condition. Important: This rate does not apply to vehicles that are driven in an aggressive manner, at high RPM, high speeds, or in a loaded condition (for trucks). Oil consumption for vehicles driven under these conditions will be more. Many factors can affect a customer's concern with oil consumption. Driving habits and vehicle maintenance vary from owner to owner. Thoroughly evaluate each case before deciding whether the vehicle in question has abnormal engine oil consumption. Gasket and External Leaks Inspect the oil pan and engine covers for leakage due to over-tightened, damaged, or out of place gaskets. Inspect oil lines and fittings for signs of leakage. Improper Reading of the Oil Level Indicator (Dipstick) Verify that the dipstick tube is fully seated in the block. When checking the oil level, make sure the dipstick is wiped clean before taking an oil level reading and fully depress the dipstick until the shoulder bottoms out on the dipstick tube. The dipstick should be the proper part number for the engine/vehicle that is being checked. Notice: Operating your vehicle with an oil level that is below the minimum level indicated on the engine oil dipstick can result in severe engine damage. Repairs resulting from operating an engine with insufficient oil are not covered under the terms of the New Vehicle Warranty. Important: Refer to Owner Manual in SI for checking and adding engine oil. Not Waiting Long Enough After Running Engine to Check Oil Level Some engines require more time than others for the oil to drain back into the crankcase. To assure a sufficient amount of oil has drained back to the crankcase, and an accurate reading can be obtained, the vehicle should be allowed to sit for at least 15 minutes, after the engine has been shut off, before taking an oil level reading. In order to ensure accurate results, the temperature of the oil should be close to the same temperature as the last time the oil level was checked. Important: This does not apply to 2006-2009 Corvette Z06 equipped with the 7.0L LS7 and the 2009 Corvette ZR-1 with the 6.2L LS9 engines (dry sump). Follow the instructions in the Owner Manual for checking the oil in this application. Improper Oil Fill after an Oil Change Following an oil change, verify that the proper amount and type of oil was put in the engine and that the oil level on the dipstick is not above the full mark or below the add marks. Refer to the Owner Manual or Service Manual for information on recommended oil quantity, viscosity, and quality. Aggressive Driving, High Speed or High RPM Driving Aggressive driving and/or continuous driving at high speeds/high RPMs will increase oil consumption. Because this may not always be an everyday occurrence, it is hard to determine exactly how much the oil economy will be affected. A higher rate of oil consumption is normal for vehicles equipped with manual transmissions that are driven aggressively. By "aggressive," we mean operation at high RPM (3,000 RPM to redline), with frequent use of engine braking (using the engine to slow the vehicle). Vehicles that are driven aggressively may consume engine oil at a rate of up to 0.946 L (1 quart) every 805 km (500 mi). This is normal for a vehicle that is driven aggressively. No repair is necessary. This characteristic does, however, require the owner to check the engine oil level at sufficiently frequent intervals, especially when driving aggressively, to assure the oil level remains within the recommended operating range. As the Owner’s Manual recommends, you should check the oil level every time you get fuel. Towing or Heavy Usage Towing a trailer will increase oil consumption and may cause oil consumption to fall below the normal accepted rate referenced in this bulletin for an unloaded vehicle in a personal use application. Large frontal area trailers will further increase the work required from the engine, especially at highway speeds, and thus increases the rate of oil consumption. Crankcase Ventilation System Verify that the positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) system is operating properly. Blockages, restrictions, or damage to the PCV system can result in increased oil use. Oil Dilution (Fuel and Water) On vehicles that are usually driven short distances, less than 8 km (5 mi), especially in colder weather, unburned fuel and condensation generated from cold engine operation may not get hot enough to evaporate out of the oil. When this occurs, the dipstick may indicate that the oil level is over-full. Subsequent driving on a trip of sufficient length to enable normal engine operating temperature for 30 minutes or more, in order to vaporize excess moisture and fuel, may give the customer the impression of excessive oil consumption. Engine Temperature If an engine is run at overheated temperatures (see Owner's Manual or Service Manual) for more than brief periods, oil will oxidize at a faster than normal rate. In addition, gaskets may distort, piston rings may stick, and excessive wear may result. Verify that all cooling system components are in proper working order. Engine Wear Piston scuffing, excessive piston-to-wall clearance, tapered or out of round cylinders, worn, damaged or improperly installed valve guides, seals and piston rings will all cause an increase in oil consumption. Measurement of Oil Consumption
  8. You got a drive it for a while for it to be able to calculate average mpg. Going a block or two is not going to give you accurate reading, go 1000 miles or more.
  9. I got OEM MICHELIN PILOT MXM4 on my CTS4 and I went and looked, only 1 wheel on the car has any weigh on it. I could not tell how much, 3 small stick-ons on the inside of the wheel. Over 40,000 miles and the car rides perfectly.
  10. There may be truth to this. I once purchased a set of GY Wranglers for a older Chevy 4x4 PU from Tire Rack. No one could balance the tires. The GY dealer tried 3x and said the tires were worst he even seen and suggested they were seconds. A GM dealer played around match mounting them and could do no better. They shook the truck starting at 45mph up. Some had to have up to 8 oz of weight to come close. The money I saved buying them from tire rack I more then spent trying to get them to balance.
  11. Synthetic oil can be by its nature high detergent especially since back when Mobil 1 first came out in 1974 it was Gr. IV PAO synthetic, not any more. What it was doing was cleaning up the engine to such as extent that the oil was used up very fast and could not keep any more contaminates is suspension to be removed by the filter, since it was at capacity as well. In that case you should change the oil filters more often till the oil consumption goes down; when introducing high quality synthetic oil into engines run a looooooooooooooong time on mineral oil. At one time, synthetic oil was made exclusively from polyalphaolefin (PAO) and ester base oils. Then the landscape became a bit murky in 1999 when Mobil challenged Castrol when Castrol introduced an oil made from Group lll base oil and called it synthetic. The dispute played out before the National Advertising Division of the Better Business Bureau and Castrol prevailed. The problem is that there is no official regulation as to what constitutes synthetic. An oil with less than 50 percent synthetic base oil can be labeled synthetic. In fact, there is absolutely nothing to prevent motor oil marketers from labeling oils made from conventional Group l or Group ll base oils as synthetic. There is currently no testing to verify the base oil content. And even if it was proven that the product contained no synthetic oil, there are no legal ramifications since no official definitions exist for the category.
  12. Conventional oils – the oils most people are familiar with – are refined from crude oil. Refining is a process of physically separating light oil components from heavy ones. Crude oil contains a full range of different kinds of molecules. Many are similar in weight but not in structure. The refining process cannot distinguish such molecules, so a wide assortment of molecules is present in a finished lubricant made from crude oil stocks. Some crude oil molecules are not beneficial to the lubrication process. For example, paraffin causes refined lubricants to thicken and flow poorly in cold temperatures. Molecules containing sulfur, nitrogen and other elements invite the formation of sludge and other products of lubricant breakdown, especially in high-temperature applications. Sludge and breakdown products significantly increase wear rates. The assorted molecules of refined lubricants also have different shapes, making lubricant surfaces irregular at the molecular level. As lubricant layers flow across one another during the lubrication process, these irregularities create friction, which consumes power, reduces efficiency and increases heat and wear. Synthetic lubricants are chemically engineered from pure chemicals rather than refined from crude oil. That gives them significant advantages over refined oils. The base stocks from which synthetic lubricants are made feature uniform and smooth molecular structures, which ensures low friction as lubricant layers slide across one another. Reduced friction increases energy through-put for greater fuel efficiency and power, and reduces heat and wear for longer equipment life. Molecular uniformity also helps synthetics resist thinning in heat and thickening in cold, which helps them protect better than refined oils over a system’s operating temperature range and helps ensure secure sealing.
  13. http://www.agcoauto.com/content/news/p2_articleid/178
  14. No benefit? Wrong, all the more reason to use a synthetic. Synthetics are engineered, not refined from crude oil, they excel in wear protection, extreme high- and low-temperature performance, foam control, viscosity retention, rust and corrosion protection, volatility and fuel economy.