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jlstemmerding

Synthetic Oil

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Is it ok to use Synthetic Oil in the older NorthStar Engines? I have a 2000 and and 2002. I want to run Amsoil SAE 5W-30 Signature Series oil in them. Does any one have any issues running this oil or any other Synthetic Oils?

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Speaking from the 10w-30 N* from the 90's, if you have any kind of seepage leak, or sticky/carbon coated rings, synthetic will leak or will be consumed a little more. I used synthetic in my '96 from 1996 till 2013. I stopped because i didn't see the benefit anymore.

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I am confused by your reply. You used synthetic in your car its whole life and stopped because you do not see the benefit anymore??? What changed?

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I just haven't been driving the car much anymore. Less than 1000 miles a year, and synthetic or regular, i drain it out every year and put a fresh 8 quarts in. My opinion is the benefit of my synthetic was on cold starts in freezing temps. I have 111,000 miles and about 110,000 were synthetic and changed when the oil life monitor hit the 10% message.

Edited by winterset

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No benefit? Wrong, all the more reason to use a synthetic.

Synthetics are engineered, not refined from crude oil, they excel in wear protection, extreme high- and low-temperature performance, foam control, viscosity retention, rust and corrosion protection, volatility and fuel economy.

Edited by Z15

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That vintage of Northstar was designed, developed and validated on regular conventional oil.


Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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I've been using the synthetic blend of Dexos approved oil.It's half one half the other. Looks like I'm in the middle of the road ,gee I might get ran over!!!LOL

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I've been using the synthetic blend of Dexos approved oil.It's half one half the other. Looks like I'm in the middle of the road ,gee I might get ran over!!!LOL

That's what I use in my Silverado pickup - the owner's manual recommends it so that's what I use.


Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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My dads truck is a 2013 Silverado that's how I got to using it. Price is not to bad and you have to use it on that year or it will void the warranty. I don't think it'll blow my Caddy up!!!LOL

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My dads truck is a 2013 Silverado that's how I got to using it. Price is not to bad and you have to use it on that year or it will void the warranty. I don't think it'll blow my Caddy up!!!LOL

My Silverado is also a 2013. I had no idea what Dexos oil was until I read the owner's manual. I have had the Silverado for a little over a year and the dealer changed the oil the first time (and didn't grease the tie rod ends...). When I pointed that out to them, they gave me another free oil change when it's due so I might not need to change the oil for another year LOL.


Kevin
'93 Fleetwood Brougham
'05 Deville
'04 Deville
2013 Silverado Z71

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http://www.gmdexos.com/brands.aspx

dexos1 for gasoline engines, dexos2 for diesel.

Web page has some GM marketing but the useful part is the list of "licensed" suppliers. Ownership of a 2011 YM GM grocery getter got me interested in learning more about dexos (2011 was factory filled with ACDelco bottled dexos).


Jim

Drive your car.

Use your cell phone.

CHOOSE ONE !

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http://www.agcoauto.com/content/news/p2_articleid/178

Confusing as it may be, dexos™ is not a brand or type of oil at all. Instead, dexos™ is a specification concocted by General Motors along with a license the auto maker sells to oil manufacturers. Oil specifications are nothing new. GM has found a way to make money, selling companies a license to display a logo on their products stating they meet GM specifications. To display the logo, oil makers now have to pay GM, though their products exceed dexos™. Any brand of oil that displays the dexos™ logo is adequate to meet GM warranty requirements.

Products that pay for the right to display the logo are no better or worse than those meeting the same standard that do not buy a license.

Edited by Z15

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They did the same thing with the Dex-Cool name!!

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By the way i use Pennzoil or Quaker State approved dexos its not a bad price compared to buying at GM for the ridicoulis price of 9$ a quart!!!

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Did we ever answer the original posters question. I just wanted to let him know that if there is a small leak or seepage with conventional oil, synthetic will be worse. I would say if the car calls for 5w, and one used 5w synthetic, it'll be just fine. If anyone wants to add more to answer the post......

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5W30 synthetic or conventional should be the same viscosity at operating temperature however when cold the synthetic will be thinner ,which is a good thing at startup ,so if your car leaks any while setting it will probably leak more. So I would say winterset is right about leakage. I hope this helps!!!

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Conventional oils – the oils most people are familiar with – are refined from crude oil. Refining is a process of physically separating light oil components from heavy ones. Crude oil contains a full range of different kinds of molecules. Many are similar in weight but not in structure. The refining process cannot distinguish such molecules, so a wide assortment of molecules is present in a finished lubricant made from crude oil stocks.

Some crude oil molecules are not beneficial to the lubrication process. For example, paraffin causes refined lubricants to thicken and flow poorly in cold temperatures. Molecules containing sulfur, nitrogen and other elements invite the formation of sludge and other products of lubricant breakdown, especially in high-temperature applications. Sludge and breakdown products significantly increase wear rates. The assorted molecules of refined lubricants also have different shapes, making lubricant surfaces irregular at the molecular level. As lubricant layers flow across one another during the lubrication process, these irregularities create friction, which consumes power, reduces efficiency and increases heat and wear.

Synthetic lubricants are chemically engineered from pure chemicals rather than refined from crude oil. That gives them significant advantages over refined oils. The base stocks from which synthetic lubricants are made feature uniform and smooth molecular structures, which ensures low friction as lubricant layers slide across one another. Reduced friction increases energy through-put for greater fuel efficiency and power, and reduces heat and wear for longer equipment life. Molecular uniformity also helps synthetics resist thinning in heat and thickening in cold, which helps them protect better than refined oils over a system’s operating temperature range and helps ensure secure sealing.

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