KHE

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About KHE

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    CaddyInfo Oldtimer

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  • Car Model and Year
    '93 FWB, '05 Deville, '04 Deville
  • Engine

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    West Michigan

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  1. I feel your pain. My wife's 2004 Deville got hit in the church parking lot a week and a half ago. No note was left. Right rear quarter panel, rear bumper, and right tail light damaged - $1600 in damage. Michigan is a no-fault state so it goes on my insurance policy. Whoever hit it knew they hit it and just left. Two weeks earlier, my boat trailer got hit in the parking lot of the launch ramp - no note left there either... At least I was able to fix that myself. It just makes one feel violated. Makes me want to buy a video camera and put it in place so I can catch these SOBs in action...
  2. Oil consumption can be an issue on the older Northstars. The oil consumption dropped when they redesigned the pistons and rings for the 2000 model year. My '04 and '05 Devilles use minimal oil between changes (the message never comes on) but the '96 and '97 Sevilles I used to own used a quart every 1500 miles and 1000 miles respectively. It was not a big deal to add a quart now and then when the message popped up on the information center. If you are serious on the car, have a combustion gas test done on the coolant to make sure you're not buying one with a bad headgasket.
  3. Wouldn't the connector plug into the sensor under your thumb in the photo above?
  4. The creaking noise in the actuators is due to the gears being stripped and/or cracked. If you have an actuator making noise, it needs to be replaced.
  5. If the "check coolant level" message comes on and the coolant level is correct, it is most likely the sensor in the surge tank. Unfortunately, GM makes you buy the whole surge tank... The OE part number is 31-2-23415 and there used to be a guy selling them on eBay but not lately. A Standard brand FLS-16 sensor is a little longer than the OE sensor but it will work if you lube it with some silicone grease. The silicone grease allows it to be pushed in enough so the harness will plug in. I went through this on a 2004 Deville I bought a few months ago. I checked the operation of the Standard Products sensor by siphoning out the surge tank. I received the low coolant message. Filling the surge tank to the correct level and the message went away. I only paid four bucks for the Standard Products sensor on eBay so it was worth it to me do some investigating to see if it would work. Remove the surge tank mounting bolts, unplug the sensor and use needle nose pliers to remove the old one - I'll bet it's split from the heat.
  6. Most likely a bad coil cassette given the fact that it is missing at idle and at speed. If it idled OK and only missed under load, that would point to spark plugs that were missing the platinum pad on the ground electrode. The platinum pad comes loose and is blown out the exhaust, then the ground electrode wears like a normal plug until the gap is excessive.
  7. It doesn't make sense that the coolant is puking on that side of the engine unless there is a leak at the water crossover gaskets or one of the silicone heater hose couplers. You might want to borrow the cooling system pressure tester from Autozone and pressurize the system when it is cold to see where it is leaking. Autozone has a block tester in their loan a tool program - you just need to buy the test fluid for $12 or so. You shouldn't do the test if you've added coolant recently as it may result in a false negative result.
  8. Disconnect the purge line from the surge tank and put it into the neck of the surge tank. Start the engine and verify that coolant is peeing out of the line. If it is not, then there is an obstruction in the purge line - most likely at the water pump cover where the hollow bolt connects the hose to the cover. Trace the line from the surge tank across the top of the engine, through the throttle body and to the water pump cover. If the line is flowing coolant, then I would test the coolant for combustion gasses.
  9. If the P1860 and P0741 codes are set, the issue is the TCC solenoid. If only the P0741 code is set, the torque converter has slip greater than 200 RPM and till set the code. The transmission needs to be pulled to repair those seals. Spruce, I had the P0741 code on my '97 STS and lived with it for years before the clutches in the torque converter started coming apart. At that point, I swapped in a low mileage used transmission since the debris was everywhere in the old transmission.
  10. Locate a starter and alternator rebuilder in your area and take the starter to them. They will repair the starter for a fraction of the cost of the chain store junk.
  11. It might make sense to take the car to an auto upholstery/trim shop and have them evaluate it. A trim shop would be experienced in repairing headliners and surely have faced these types of issues before. A few years ago, I came close to buying a 1990 Brougham with the towing package and the only issue was a sagging headliner - I called the trim shop near me and they were very helpful. They said if the existing backer was not ruined with the push pins, it could be recovered, otherwise a junkyard headliner would need to be used just to obtain an undamaged backer. Seems like the price was about $200 to have them do the work. I didn't buy the car so I didn't obtain any more information.
  12. Yes - I had an extensive phone conversation with the guru when I repaired my Seville STS engine several years ago. The head bolts are not torque to yield. They provide constant clamping force due to the low static torque and the angular specification which removes friction from the equation as compared to just a standard torque value. Torque to yield bolts do get into the plastic region - that is the design of the rod cap bolts.
  13. Probably wrong terminology - the head bolts do not get into the plastic/elastic region. If there was a practical method to clean and re-apply the micro-encapsulated threadlocker, the head bolts could be re-used over and over. The rod bolts are torque to yield bolts - there is no threadlocker on them and the shop manual states they are not to be re-used.
  14. The Northstar head bolts are not torque to yield bolts. They have a microencapsulated threadlocker that acts as an anti-seize and locks them into place. There is no practical way of applying it in the field and there is not a substitute, so the procedure is to replace the head bolts. Glad to help. If you go to Timesert's website and look up the manufacturer's specific kits, in the Bigsert kit description, it actually says "for use when a Heilicoil pulls out" or something to that effect.
  15. DO NOT use Heilicoils in the Northstar engine - you will rip them out of the block the minute you torque the head bolts. Then you will need to use a Bigsert (large Timesert threaded bushing to repair the block). I tend to think that using Bigserts may weaken the block. I had a block crack on my '97 Seville after several years of service (that I repaired with Bigserts). I realize it is only one data point but I have no idea why other than it weakened the block enough that the internal stresses eventually caused the block to crack.