Cadillac Jim

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Everything posted by Cadillac Jim

  1. My real name is Cadillac Jim.
  2. With the backup cameras on most cars now, and a hard disk in the dashboard, I'm wondering when somebody will get the idea of having dashcam, including the rear view camera, recorded with a week of history available for download on a memory stick. Waking up the PZM/BCM would turn on the cameras. YouTube dashcams would become a lot more entertaining. Right now the most hilarious ones are Russian insurance fraud compilations. I have a dashcam on my car. I have seen some great shots that I didn't bother to take off of it before they got overwritten. For example, an Esclade was tailgating me when I pulled up to a red light, and it pulled over to the left turn lane and ran the light, without turning. I'm not in a driver's ed state, so pulling up to a red light safely means that you watch out for cars turning left and cutting the corner clear over to your side of the road where you would be stopping for the light, even in the right lane. Etc.
  3. Big black multi-piston Brembos. I sold the ETC some time ago and drive a 2011 CTS-V now. I'm just now starting to do my own work on it. It's entered middle age, where dealers want to sell out-of-warranty work that I don't want done. I had that problem with the ETC once it hit 60,000 miles; that's the thing that first drove me to Caddyinfo, help in taking on maintenance of the ETC myself. After that I have tried to give back by helping others here. The 1997 ETC never did need much, once I got away from dealer oil changes. It did have the dreaded head gasket problem and I put in a Jasper. Sold it at about 165,000 miles. Still miss it sometimes. The 1997 ETC went 120,000 miles before needing its first brake job. A couple of years ago I dropped my CTS-V off at a dealer for an oil change and got a call to pick it up, where they told me that they did a 4-wheel full brake job, including calipers, disks hubs and rotors, because reasons. After that $2K++ oil change I insisted on approving all work before it starts - but now they want to replace the rear shocks, the differential, and the drive shaft, so I'm going local with oil changes from now on. I have no plans for doing the shocks, differential, or drive shaft in the foreseeable future. This car broke me of my lead foot and I don't beat on my baby, and so far this is the most reliable car I've ever owned. The brakes are relatively new, I've historically been easy on brakes - I love to drive, but I hate to STOP - so I don't expect to do the brakes for years. I have the SI DVD which includes the complete 2011 FSM for the CTS-V including overhaul manuals for the transmission and such and am ready. If you like I will post the FSM diagrams on the calipers. I just checked the 2011 FSM and the emergency brake is a drum-in-hat in the rear rotors on my car. Much less elegant than the DeVille emergency brake setup but I suppose they did that with the CTS-V to be compatible with the Brembos design as-is. The rear calipers are four-piston, two pistons to a side, with a brake fluid pressure balance tube, both sides and the tube as a don't-take-it-apart assembly. Brake option isn't on the sheet under the spare tire cover (probably part of the V package, but I do see the wheel and tire size options separately); I believe the Brembos RPO is J56, guessing from the RPO list in the FSM and the options listed for the CTS. Other than the size of the calipers and the number of pistons, it's similar to the DeVille. A one-piston caliper will have more provision for side-to-side float as the pads wear but the pistons on both sides, and having two pistons per side, are the big differences. According to the FSM, changing the pads is a snap. You remove a guide pin, then a pad positioning spring, then another guide pin, then pull the pads. You use "a spreader tool" (no GM special tool called out) to put new pads in, then put the pins and spring back, and "burnish the pads and disk." You operate the brakes to re-adjust the brake fluid levels, top off the master cylinder, and your'e done. The burnishing operation is 20 gentle stops with reasonable cool-off intervals. This sounds very much like the process of changing the pads on the disk brakes on my 1966 Corvette, which I had in 1966-1967.
  4. Wait for OldCadTech for more brake service information. He's the "more experienced [than I]" Caddyinfo member that you need for your brake work. Others will pitch in when they can, and there are lots of other good hands out and about on Caddyinfo. OldCadTech is one of the best.
  5. I looked at the 2002 model year information on my SI DVD (that's as far back as the 2011 SI DVD goes) and it's much the same as the 1997 FSM for regular brakes. There is a heavy duty brake option that may have been part of a trailer hauling package or other option, RPO J55, but that isn't available in the 1997 model year. So, I didn't need the VIN, but since you posted it, here is what I find. You should copy the information to a text file and keep it handy with your other car records. The VIN, build date, paint number, and RPO list will be on a sticker on the inside of the spare tire cover in the trunk, but this list includes a line or two that explains each RPO. Most of them are known but a few of them may be difficult to interpret without this list. Car build date May 5, 1997. There were about 101,000 cars like yours built. RPO list: RPO Description Matches UW6 SPEAKER SYSTEM,6,DUAL FRONT DOOR TWEETER & WOOFER,DUAL EXTENDED RANGE 6 SPKR SYS(UW6) 72,078 U02 CLUSTER,INSTRUMENT,KILOMETER AND MILES,DIGITAL DISPLAY DIGITAL DISPLAY CSTR(U02) 92,059 U09 HORN,FOUR NOTE 4 NOTE HORN(U09) 100,970 U1L RADIO - AM STEREO/FM STEREO, SEEK/SCAN, AUTO/REV MUSIC SEARCH CASS, CLOCK, ETR RADIO,AFS,SS,CAS(U1L) 72,078 U75 ANTENNA,POWER(CHROME) PWR ANT(U75) 101,921 VM3 LABEL INFORMATION CONSUMER, CONTAINS BPR IMP STANDARD FOR FRT 5 MPH & RR 5 MPH 5 MPH BUMPER INFO LABEL(VM3) 82,609 V73 VEHICLE STATEMENT - US/CANADA US/CANADA VEHICLE STATEMENT(V73) 100,155 WJ7 TRIM,INTERIOR(LEATHER) LEATHER TR(WJ7) 99,797 15I INTERIOR TRIM,SHALE/NEUTRAL (15I) 65,193 152 TRIM COMBINATION,SHALE,LEATHER (152) 47,121 38U EXTERIOR COLOR,PRIMARY,BRIGHT TEAL METALLIC (38U) 6,981 46A ACCENT STRIPE COLOR,TWO TONE,LT CHESTNUT/GARNET RED (46A) 49,287 6LR COMPONENT FRT LH COMPUTER SEL SUSP SUSP(6LR) 100,915 7LR COMPONENT FRT RH - COMPUTER SEL SUSP SUSP(7LR) 100,915 8AP COMPONENT- COMPUTER SELECTED, SUSPENSION SUSP(8AP) 90,200 9AP COMPONENT- COMPUTER SELECTED, SUSPENSION SUSP(9AP) 90,200 AJ7 RESTRAINT SYSTEM FRT SEAT, INFLATABLE, DRIVER AND PASSENGER, FRT & SIDE INFL RST FRT & SI(AJ7) 101,931 AM6 SEAT,FRONT SPLIT,3 PASSENGER WITH CENTER ARMREST FRT SPLIT ST(AM6) 77,139 CJ2 HVAC SYSTEM AIR CONDITIONER FRT, AUTO TEMP CONT, AUX TEMP CONT A/C FRT AUTO/AUX CONT(CJ2) 101,921 DA1 ARM REST RR SEAT, STORAGE R/SEAT STOR A/RST(DA1) 99,237 DD0 MIRROR,O/S,R AND L REM CTL,ELEC,DEFOG,LT SENSITIVE O/S ELEC R/CON MIR(DD0) 100,227 DD8 MIRROR,INSIDE,REARVIEW,TILT,AUTOMATIC,LIGHT SENSITIVE I/S RR VIEW MIR,LIGHT SENSITIVE(DD8) 58,928 DEH PLANT CODE - DETROIT/HAMTRAMCK, MI, BOC HAMTRAMCK, MI PLANT(DEH) 101,919 D98 STRIPE,BODY SIDE ACCENT AND DECK LID ACNT STRPE(D98) 90,928 E2F RAPID DELIVERY SYS - FORECAST HOLES (E/K/V-TRK CKST) 60,135 E2M RAPID DELIVERY SYS - POPULAR CONFIGURATIONS THAT FALL BELOW THE MIN (E/K/V-TRK CKST) 30,563 E2P RAPID DELIVERY SYS - POPULAR CONFIGURATIONS (E/K/V-TRK CKST) 45,044 FE1 SUSPENSION SYSTEM,SOFT RIDE SOFT RIDE SUSP(FE1) 91,054 FE9 FEDERAL EMISSION CERTIFICATION FED EMIS(FE9) 86,973 FV3 RATIO TRANSAXLE FINAL DRIVE 3.11 3.11R(FV3) 92,059 IQ2 TRIM,INTERIOR DESIGN (IQ2) 75,292 JL9 BRAKE SYSTEM,POWER,FRONT AND REAR DISC,ANTILOCK FRT & RR DISC ANTILOCK BRK(JL9) 100,927 KG9 GENERATOR,140 AMPERE 140 AMP(KG9) 100,602 LD8 ENGINE GAS,8CYL,4.6L,V8,DOHC,SFI,(281C.I.D.)(NORTHSTAR) 4.6Y(LD8) 92,059 MH1 TRANSMISSION AUTO 4 SPD, 4T80E, ELECTRONIC CONV CLUTCH 4-SPD A/TRANS(MH1) 101,921 MX0 TRANSMISSION,AUTOMATIC,OVERDRIVE(MERCHANDISING OPTION) A/TRANS PROVISIONS(MX0) 101,932 NF2 EMISSION SYSTEM,FEDERAL,TIER 1 FED EMIS SYS(NF2) 86,974 NP5 STEERING WHEEL,LEATHER WRAPPED LEATHER WRAPPED STRG WHL(NP5) 101,932 NV8 STEERING POWER, MAGNETIC SPEED, VARIABLE ASSIST MAG SPD VAR ASSIST P/S(NV8) 101,921 QC9 WHEEL 16 X 7, ALUMINUM, SPORT ALUM WHL(QC9) 59,564 QPY TIRE ALL P225/60R16 WS2 R/PE ST TL ALS 97S TIRE(QPY) 91,042
  6. I'm sorry, I don't see how I conveyed that impression. would first figure out whether the OP's brakes are or are not the same as the parts breakdown. Sometimes it's not immediately clear. We need to hear what he means by "That is not... what my caliper looks like." Something more specific would be helpful. Hauling out the 1997 E/K FSM, section 5B2, I see only one rear caliper without exclusions or separate paragraphs for RPO codes, which tells me that all rear calipers up until the manual went to press (3/6/97 press date on the first page; I ordered the manuals from Helm in October, 1997 when I bought the car) are the same. Since there is only one rear caliper in the 1997 FSM, I don't need the VIN; the only rear caliper diagram that I have is shown below. I see that the FSM full-page figure on page 5B2-3 is similar to OldCdTech's diagram except that my FSM figure has a different emergency brake emergency brake lever, bracket, and return spring, and there is a "PAD CLIP," number 4 in my diagram, that I don't see in your diagram. Your diagram is apparently from a later SI DVD or manual. Either later production has a change in the emergency brake cable bracket and return spring, the diagram in my FSM is incorrect (rare, but I've see it before) or your diagram is for a different model year. The operation of the brake, from my FSM page 5B2-1, is: "This caliper has a single bore and is mounted to the support bracket with two mouing bolt and sleeve assemblies. Hydraulic pressure, created by applying the brake pedal, is converted by the caliper to a stopping force. This force ats equally against the piston and the bottom of the piston bore to move the piston outward and to move (slide) the caliper inward resulting in a clamping action. This clamping action presses the linings against the rotor, creating friction to stop the vehicle." More to the point, the operation of the emergency brake follows in the next two paragraphs: When the parking brake is applied, the external caliper parking brake lever moves and rotates a spindle within the caliper housing. As the spindle rotates, a connecting rod is pushed against an internal adjusting screw which is theaded into a sleeve nut (cone) in the piston assembly. This causes the piston assembly to move outward bringing the inboard pad and lining assembly against the rotor. As the inboard and lining contacts the rotor, a reaction force causes the caliper housing to slide inward pressing the outboard pad and lining against the rotor." "The piston assembly contains a self-adjusting mechanism to keep the parking brake in proper adjustment. As the linings are worn, the piston moves through the seal to maintain proper lining to rotor clearance. The park brake adjusts to proper clearances through an internal sleeve nut that rotates and moves as one unit with the piston." I you want translation from "technical writer-ese" to plain English, let me know and I'll do an interpretation. I don't see a special tool called out for this section of the manual. I hope this helps.
  7. Others with more experience in brake work can likely get you the right diagram. If that's a problem and you need the diagram, let me know your VIN by PM and I'll get your option list off the WWW and check my 1997 FSM for the right diagram and upload it.
  8. "Totaled" is an insurance company term, you and your lawyer should ignore it. I once caw a beautiful yellow 1953 Buick convertible show car drive through an intersection, and some yahoo decided to run a red light and do a left turn, with a visible-a-half-block-away I'm-coming-through-gang-WAY attitude, and he careened into the left quarter panel. This was in 2015, I believe. I didn't drive up and volunteer as a witness because I was a half block away and all eyes were on this jerk at the time, in the center of a small suburban town (the main intersection in the center of the town!) and there were a lot of those eyes, many of them within feet of the incident. I have seen insurance adjusters representing people that are 100% at fault try to offer junk price or less for a car that their client has damaged. Just say no; don't get mad, ignore the word "total" and demand that the car be fixed or replaced to your satisfaction. Note that replacement of a cherry Diamond White 1996 Deville is impractical, if not impossible. Any experienced personal damage lawyer will know all this and much more as second nature. Yes, they can fix your car, to your satisfaction, and the repair will make the car like new. Finding the right shop is the key, and handling the insurance agent for the other driver is a nuisance but doable. I hope the young girl got out of a car and into rehab. Drunk, stoned, and careening into Diamond White Cadillacs in traffic is no way to go through life.
  9. Never underestimate the power of salt on a grease seal when the car sits for long periods of time. I once saw a new Porsche 911 being driven by a teen assistant mechanic blow out of a light change and, at 100++ mph, rear-end an old couple in an Olds sedan a quarter mile ahead and total both cars. On my current car, I've found curb abrasions on three wheels that had been "buffed out" before I got the car. The only perfect wheel is one I replaced myself about a year after I got the car. Not to say that the rear hub is suspect; your vast experience is more than enough to forget the rear hub for now, but I'm saying that anything is possible in an old car unless it's never been out of your sight. A previous owner could have bruised the right rear hub by sliding against a curb in the snow or whatever.
  10. You could use a Factory Shop Manual (FSM). They are pricey new but cheap on eBay and such. They will pay for themselves the first time you use them by telling you about things like the rear brakes and how to deal with the emergency brake. Special tools, if you really do need one, are often available for loan or rent from Caddyinfo people, and can sometimes be found on eBay at good prices.
  11. There is a controller under the dashboard but to the left of the glove compartment. Without going to the factory shop manual I couldn't tell you whether it is best reached from the passenger side or the driver's side, but I believe that it is on the passenger side. Look for the box with a wiring connector on it with several wires; that is the A/C controller. It has a module inside that talks to the A/C controls and tells the fan and air control doors what to do.
  12. It's good that you solved the coolant issue and you did well by using DexCool or equivalent. After driving the car, walk around the car and see if any of the wheels are warm (or hot), indicating a dragging brake. That will pinpoint the wheel to look at. The vacuum comes through the firewall behind the glove compartment. If you have good vacuum all the way to the emergency brake release and have a B1341, then the temperature control door is sticking. You need to find that door and check to see if something is catching in the external mechanism. If not, either the electrically controlled vacuum actuator is sticking (most likely) or the door itself is sticking. If it's the door, you might be able to free it up by hand. The actuator might be limbered up but if it's sticking you will likely need to replace it eventually for the problem to go away for good.
  13. It sounds like the calipers are not opening on the passenger side, and the brakes are dragging slightly. This can be caused by a sticking caliper, or a flexible brake line that is breaking down inside and blocks fluid flow in one or both directions. Also, some Cadillacs have wear sensors in the brake pads and some don't; make sure that you got the right pads for your car. History is good. It means that the problem isn't doing anything right this minute. Codes are P0171 Fuel Trim System Lean Bank 1 P0174 Fuel Trim System Lean Bank 2 P1527 Transmission Range to Pressure Switch Correlation B1552 Keep Alive Memory (KAM) Error B1910 Generator L-Terminal Open Circuit c1210 [don't have that one] U1255 Class 2 Communication Malfunction (Serial Data Line Malfunction) B1341 Air Mix Door Two Movement Fault b2560 [don't have that one] The B1341 says that the problem with your A/C is an air mix door. That's good news because it isn't Freon or the compressor or whatever. You can check to see if vacuum is getting all the way across by starting the engine and letting it idle for a few seconds to build up vacuum, then, in Park, setting the emergency brake. When you shift out of Park, the emergency brake should release automatically. If it does not, you have a vacuum problem under the dashboard. The P0171 and P0174 probably means that you have a vacuum leak, or that your air filter element is clogged. The rest may not mean anything; ignore them for now. If you have been having minor overheating problems, check the radiator for leaves clogging the air flow. The thing in front of the A/C condenser is the power steering cooler; clean the leaves out of it too. If the coolant hasn't been changed in the last four years (red antifreeze) or two years if green antifreeze has been in the car since it was last flushed, change the coolant.
  14. Sounds like you should have started coming here awhile back. First, if you have new pads and caliper and they are squeaking loudly or squealing, you should take the car back to the place that did the work. Ask them to verify that they put the right parts on your car, verified by VIN number or the options list. Also, ask them to check the flexible brake lines and make sure that they flushed the brake fluid after work was completed. Your car has On-Board Diagnostics (OBD) and you can access it from the A/C buttons on the radio. There's a link in my signature block to a Caddyinfo page on how to do this. Here's my instructions for the 1997 model year: Here's how to put your car's computer in the diagnostic mode and list the OBD codes. Get a pencil and paper handy, then turn the key on and wait a few seconds for the dash lights to settle to normal. Then, on the A/C console, press <Off> and <Pass Warmer> together for a few seconds, until all the dash lights light up like you just turned on the key. The codes will scroll across the driver information center below the speedometer. Write them down. They will be of the form ACM B1347 CURRENT The most important parts are the single letter with four numbers and the notation CURRENT or HISTORY. Write them down to post here. The list will end with the prompt "PCM?" You can press <Off> to repeat the list to catch any you missed or to check the list. When you are done, you can take your car's computer out of the diagnostic mode by pressing the Auto button on the A/C, pressing "Info reset," or turning the key off. The three-letter acronym is for the module that threw the code. The modules are polled by the car's computer (the Instrument Panel Module, or IPM) in the order PCM, IPM, ACM, SDM (air bag module), TCS, RSS, PZM (body module), IRC (radio), RFA (key fob), CCP (Climate Control Panel), MSM, MMM, PHN. Modules may be skipped if the car is not so equipped (RSS, PHN) and the list may vary with different options. When you are done, post your OBD codes here. We should be able to tell you what is happening with your A/C and rear suspension self-leveling.
  15. You came to the right place. I drove a 1997 Eldorado for 15 years and its current owner is a moderator here, and we have several excellent career auto techs with extensive experience maintaining and repairing 1990's Cadillacs.
  16. I just got the main page from both links. Here's how to find the instruction sheets from the links on the main page. Start with the main page, http://www.timesert.com At the top of the page just below the flash animation, there are four navigation links, including "KITS & INSERTS". Clicking those gets you drop-down menus, etc. Select "Kits & INSERTS" -> "Manufacturer Kits" -> "General Motors" Scroll down or search on the part numbers, 42385-500 for 1995-1999 (your engine), 42385-2000 for 2000-2003 (not needed today), or 42385-2030 (2004 and later, your kit). Clock on the big blue link "INSTRUCTIONS" under the part number in the third column and you will be able to download a one-page PDF file for each kit. I don't see much difference between the instructions sheets; they just tell you how to use the kit on each head bolt hole, and in general that doesn't change much between kits. The big thing is that there is a caution at the beginning of the kit for 2004 and later that says to use a stop collar on the drill for the shallow holes, but there are no shallow holes in the kit for 1995-1999. I would gather that there is no guarantee that the drills are exactly the same length, so I wouldn't use the kit for 2004+ for a 1995-1999 engine without talking to TimeSert and asking them. There is a page you get to with the "INFORMATION" link at the top of every page that will get you a page with an information form link. To save time and get to the point, the threads are different so the drills and taps will be different, so I would just get the right kit.
  17. There are three Northstar TimeSert kits, one for 1995-1999, one for 2000-2003, and one for 2004-up which you have. The difference between the first two is the depths of the head bolt holes, which affects the guides for drilling and tapping, and I would not expect the head bolt hole depths for 2004-up to be the same as 1995-1999. There are people here who can lend, rent or sell the kit for 1995-1999 minus the TimeSerts themselves, which are available separately.
  18. Engine oil leaks? That bothers me because sitting unused should not cause things to open up. Where is the oil coming from? Wheel height sensors can always be added later because it's all totally separate and the mounting is easily accessible. It's the kind of thing you would use in road tuning and trial laps, and you don't need it in the way when you're doing design and construction. I got the idea when you mentioned wheel travel limits and measuring wheel height with the strut bellows/boot off, then having to put the bellows/boot back on for the road.
  19. My thinking is that if you do geek out the car just a bit, like you do when you use auto tuning software, having a record of ride height for each wheel could be very valuable in selecting shock damping, evaluating tires, etc. Very little software can tell when all the tires aren't in the same plane and thus flag wheel hop, for example, and whenever any wheel hits its limit of travel you need to know that the suspension dynamics have gone back to the stone age for that wheel. I can think of ways that a real-time display from that data could be more valuable in an autocross race than any other dashboard readout.
  20. The ride height sensors don't have anything to do with the shocks, electrically. They are little boxes that bolt to the chassis and have arms that stick out, then links from the ends of the arms to a suspension arm. All Cadillacs that have rear-end leveling have them on the rear. The ones that connect to the PZM have three-wire connectors (hot on start and run, ground, signal). But, I see your point, and also that you have moved on. Adding a bolt with a cam on it for quick adjustment of camber for road vs. track is a really great idea.
  21. You don't need the OBD II system if you read the sensors directly. The ride height sensors are, within the sensor, just a source of voltage proportional to sensor arm angle. It's possible that there are more electronics in the sensors, and they vary from year to year, but if you interface with the sensor directly, you can have data recording or even cockpit monitoring of wheel height on each wheel with signal directly from the wheel height sensors. You can install the ride height sensors of your choice or even make your own. If the sensors are a problem for racing, you can remove them after testing. This is a concept of a wheel height sensor. Complexity added in later models will include a gear reduction between the sensor lever and the voltage divider shaft, and, for a later model that uses full modules at the wheel height sensors, digital electronics to digitize the voltage output and put it on a Class 2 bus. You will like the early model, perhaps with the gear reduction (a little plastic planetary producing about 4:1 is about right). You will need to calibrate your guages from 0-5 volts to inches or cm of wheel height.
  22. Could you get the ride height data for each front wheel from the OBE II interface and use that to track wheel position?
  23. My dad's shop of the 1950's used a 2.5 meter tall press/cutter to cut springs. Everybody called it the Big Dog. It was designed for leaf springs but had bits for coil springs. We used it a lot for making truck springs (big truck springs are never catalog items and are made to spec in the shop that installs them). We also used it for repairing automotive and small truck springs by making new leaves to replace broken spring leaves, etc. A separate operation, usually involving a big hammer and a special anvil, was used to adjust the spring curvature. I never saw the Big Dog used for coil springs but I'm sure that it did happen once in a long while. I like the metal saw better. It's important that the spring temperature be kept low enough so that the steel temper is not affected more than a few mm from the cut, which is a skill set thing that you demonstrated in your video here.
  24. You would need more radiator for that much output, and a separate transmission cooler plus a special build of the transmission, be it the 4T80E or the transmission from the LS4 donor car. Tire size and clearance will again rear their ugly heads when you balance the chassis for the added power.